Horseshoe Bend Parking Lot Reopens, Entrance Fees Implemented

Effective Saturday, April 13th, the newly expanded visitor parking area at the Horseshoe Bend Overlook South of Page, AZ, will be open to the public. The parking lot had been closed during the daytime hours since January 30th to facilitate completion of the project before peak tourist season in Northern Arizona. 

Visitors to the Horseshoe Bend Overlook will also be required to pay entrance fees determined by City of Page Resolution #1224-19, effective immediately, as follows:

  • Motorcycle: $5
  • Passenger vehicles (car, truck, SUV, RV, motorhome): $10
  • Commercial vans with passenger capacity of 14 or less: $35*
  • Mid-sized commercial and tour buses with passenger capacity of 15-35: $70*
  • Full-size buses with passenger capacity of 35 or more: $140*

*commercial and touring vehicle fees are determined by vehicle size, not number of passengers it is carrying

The above fees may be subject to change without notice.

“Those planning trips to Page, AZ, and Horseshoe Bend are reminded that if they find all official parking areas to be full at the time of their visit, they will be required to return at another time when they can find available space. Parking on the side of US89 is strictly prohibited.

Those planning trips to Page, AZ, and Horseshoe Bend are reminded that if they find all official parking areas to be full at the time of their visit, they will be required to return at another time when they can find available space. Parking on the side of US89 is strictly prohibited. Those who do so risk having their vehicle towed and incurring fines. The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is busiest between the hours of 9:00 AM and 6:00 PM when day visitors from Las Vegas, Phoenix, Flagstaff, and other gateway communities are arriving and departing.

Should you prefer not to deal with the potential inconvenience and expense of the new arrangements at Horseshoe Bend, other means of seeing this unique curve of the Colorado River include:

Advance reservations are strongly recommended for all guided tours to Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon, and Lake Powell.

345 Responses

  1. Alley! I’ve spent the last 2 hours reading all the wonderful tips you’ve given and am so grateful I did. My husband and I will be visiting page and gc for the first time Oct 23rd. We will be driving from Dallas, TX and we’re originally planning on staying in page. We will arrive that Friday, explore that night, wake up bright and early to see sunrise at horseshoe bend, drive to the GC Stay a few hours and drive back. My worry is leaving the gc by 3pm and that 5hr or so drive back up to page. Will it be too dark and dangerous back to page that evening.. say the last 1.5hrs of our journey back will be after sunset. Our hotel is off US89.

    1. Hi Serena,
      Thank you for your compliments. That makes it all the more difficult to have to tell you that your plan is not feasible or safe.
      Normally, the drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim takes ~3 hours. Due to a critical component of the shortest trip route being closed (AZ64 from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View Point) by order of the Navajo Tribe, this necessitates a very long detour down to Flagstaff, AZ, then back North via US180/AZ64 or I40/AZ64 to Grand Canyon South Rim (see map). This means that a 3-hour drive is now more along the lines of 4.5-5 hours. BTW Google maps lists the drive as taking 3 hours and 40 minutes, but this is not realistic; that figure is wheels turning, no stops, which rarely happens in this neck of the woods. Trust me, I lived and drived these roads for 20+ years!
      In light of that fact alone, you should strongly consider spending the night at Grand Canyon South Rim instead of attempting to do this as a day trip from Page, AZ. Another mitigating factor: you’re dealing with days that area rapidly shortening. In late October, sunrise takes place at ~6:30 AM, sunset occurs just after 6:00 PM. That means you have about 12 hours of daylight to work with. With 9-10 hours of that eaten up by the drive to and from, that only leaves you a small window of opportunity for sightseeing, lunch, and other logistics.
      In answer to your specific question about US89 being too “dark and dangerous” in the hours after sunset, that’s affirmative! That particular area is very dimly lit, and can be populated by large wildlife such as deer and elk, as well as free range livestock such as cattle, goats, sheep, and even wild horses. You don’t want to risk a collision with one in an area that’s pitch black, possibly cold (nighttime temps can dip down around freezing this time of year), where cell service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
      Again, for your safety and enjoyment, plan on spending a night at the Grand Canyon.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi,

        My friend and I will be hiking in Sedona and the Grand Canyon in November. I read that Antelope Canyon is closed due to the pandemic. Is Horseshoe Bend closed as well?

        Any information would be appreciated.

        Thanks!

        1. Hi Jane!
          You are correct that the Antelope Canyons are closed. However, Horseshoe Bend remains open! It is one of the few attractions in the Page, AZ, area that never closed through the pandemic.
          You mention that you will also be spending time in Sedona and Grand Canyon South Rim. Please note that it takes ~3 hours to drive from Sedona, AZ, to Page, AZ. It then takes ~5 hours to drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim. Normally, the latter drive would only be ~3 hours, but the closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Lands to outsiders due to COVID-19, has resulted in the closure of an essential component of the shortest travel route. Therefore, it is necessary to detour through Flagstaff, AZ, to get from Page, AZ to Grand Canyon South Rim (or vice versa). Map Long story short, if you do wish to visit Horseshoe Bend, we would strongly recommend staying overnight in Page, AZ, so you’re not spending 6-8 hours behind the wheel of your car just to visit an attraction that takes at most 2 hours of your time.
          Hope that makes sense, and helps in your planning.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  2. Hi! Wow you are so informative.

    My siblings and I are planning on coming to the Grand Canyon on Nov1st. We are traveling to Phoenix and driving down to Page, AZ for the weekend and returning back on Monday. We have two full days there and were planning on visiting the horseshoe bend and the Navajo Nation but now that we know the Navajo Nation is closed there is so much that we can see but we just don’t know where to go in just the two days we are there.

    What would you recommend for a 2-day itinerary that would give us the best overall experience of the Grand Canyon? And which tickets should we purchase in advance?

    Thank you so much in advance

    1. Hi Minerva, and thank you for your compliments!
      Here’s the deal: Page, AZ, and the Grand Canyon are two separate areas. With the closure of the Navajo Nation, they are even more “separate” than they were before. If you only have two days to work with, seeing both areas is going to require a lot of time on the road. Time and desire permitting, you could do something like this:
      Day 1 – Drive from Phoenix, Page, AZ, ~a 5-hour drive. Overnight in Page, AZ.
      Day 2 – Visit Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning (sunrise in early November occurs ~7:00 AM), then drive to Grand Canyon South Rim. **Normally, the trip to Grand Canyon South Rim would be ~3 hours, but due to the closure of the Navajo Nation, it is now necessary to take a detour through Flagstaff to get there. This has turned a 3-hour drive into more like a 5-hour drive.** Overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim
      Day 3 – Drive back to Phoenix, ~5 hours
      If the prospect of packing up and driving for 5 hours a day doesn’t appeal, you’ll have to either carve out more time for your trip, or eliminate one of the destinations on your wish list. If you haven’t been to the Grand Canyon, that should take priority over Page, AZ.
      Whatever you decide, all hotels and guided tours must be booked in advance. Just because COVID-19 has reduced traffic in the area somewhat, that doesn’t mean you’re free to “wing it.”
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Thank you so much.

        We are traveling on Friday and returning on Monday, therefore we have Saturday and Sunday to fully get to explore the area. Horseshoe bend on Saturday and Grand Canyon South Rim.

        Any suggestions for helicopter tours of the south rim? Or do you suggest a better type of helicopter tour?

        What suggestions do you have for the Sunday? I hear the Wire Pass Canyon may be open but we are not familiar with the area.

        Sorry for all the questions, we are just not familiar at all.

        1. Hey again, Minerva,
          For helicopter tours, Grand Canyon South Rim is the best place to do that. If possible, opt for the longer flight (40-45 minutes) on the Eco-Star EC-130 helicopter, and do it first thing in the morning for best light and lack of wind.
          Regarding Wire Pass Canyon, it is open, but a few things to consider before you go: it is a moderately strenuous hike, with an 8-10′ drop a short ways into the slot canyon. This may be a deterrent to inexperienced hikers, or individuals afraid of heights. Another consideration is that the trailhead to Wire Pass Canyon is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road, an unpaved road. While it is regularly graded and accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. We strongly recommend looking into a guided tour that can get you to there and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Reputable companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
          – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
          – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
          – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
          Hope that helps and that you have a wonderful trip!
          Alley 🙂

      2. Thank you so much for your information. We are going to Page in early November also from Santa Fe and then to the Grand Canyon. It was good to learn that the 3 hour drive will now be a 5 hour drive.

        1. Hi Margarita,
          We know that vacations can be full of surprises, we’d rather they not be unpleasant ones!
          Have a good trip, and a happy holiday season.
          Alley:)

  3. Hi, I am planning a trip to Page, AZ in April 2021. We want to paddle the lake and horseshoe bend. Is there a launching site where we wont have to hike down with our paddle boards?

    1. Hi Trish,
      This is a great question!
      Stand-Up Paddleboarding (SUP) has grown in popularity at Lake Powell, and for good reason. Lots of room to get away from the crowds, and no shortage of amazing scenery! The best places to launch out of, in no particular order, are Lake Powell Resort & Marina, Antelope Point Marina, Wahweap Swim Beach, and Lone Rock Beach. Some of these might involve a short walk, but nothing that would qualify as a “hike.” For more information about SUPing on Lake Powell, visit Lake Powell Paddleboards
      Horseshoe Bend is a bit more complicated. To SUP through Horseshoe Bend, you must drive down to Lees Ferry, hire a backhaul service, get dropped off at the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle the 15-mile stretch through Glen Canyon back to Lees Ferry. For more information on this option, visit http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  4. Hi. Planning on visiting oct 16-17
    Is the entrance ticket/parking fee first in first serve or can it be purchased in advance?

    Any other activities (relatively) Nearby you can recommend?

    1. Hi Maya,
      Parking at Horseshoe Bend is strictly first-come/first-serve. Advance reservations are not taken.
      As for other activities you can enjoy in the Page, AZ, area, there’s no shortage of them! Which one(s) you choose depend on your traveling party, how much time you have, and your trip budget, among other factors. These include but aren’t limited to:
      – Grandview Overlook Park
      – Wahweap Marina
      – Antelope Point Marina
      – The Chains & Hanging Garden Trail
      – Lone Rock Beach
      – Page Rim View Trail
      – The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
      – Wahweap Overlook
      – Glen Canyon Dam Overlook
      – Alstrom Point
      – Skylight Arch
      – White Pocket
      – Wire Pass/Buckskin Gulch
      – Lees Ferry & Lonely Dell Ranch
      – Navajo Bridge & Interpretive Center
      – Glen Canyon Conservancy Flagship Store
      – Kayak Tours on Lake Powell & the Colorado River
      – Private Boat Charters
      – Airplane & Helicopter Tours
      – Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge
      – Jeep/ATV Tours
      – Electric Mountain Bike Tours
      – Big Water, Utah, Visitors Center
      – “The Moon”, Big Water, Utah
      Whatever you decide, be sure to make advance reservations any and all hotels and guided tours.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hello! I am very sorry to bother you. We are planning on renting a car and driving from Vegas to Horseshoe Bend at the end of October. Do we need some kind of sticker ( National Parks Sticker etc.)?
        Thank you very much!

        1. Hi Velina,
          Goodness gracious, it’s no bother at all 😉
          If you plan to just visit Horseshoe Bend while in Page, AZ, you do not need a National Parks Pass. The parking lot is administered by the City of Page, AZ, and a one-time fee of $10 is collected for standard passenger vehicles to park, walk to the rim, take photos, then walk back. Allot approximately 2 hours for this activity. Be aware that a construction project is taking place near Horseshoe Bend that may delay travel slightly.
          Now if you want to go down to the waterline of Lake Powell, that is located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and in that instance, you would be required to pay a $30/vehicle entrance fee (one exception: more on that in a minute), which is good for one week’s time. Simply hold on to your original receipt if you plan to stay in the area for more than 1 day.
          Regarding the exception to the entrance fee rule, that would be the Chains/Hanging Garden area, which is on the Eastern flank of the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge. There, you can park your vehicle and walk down to the water. It is a ways down, which means it’s a ways back up! At the end of October, the water may be too cold for swimming, but you can at least dip your feet in if you want.
          One last thing: it does take approximately 5 hours to drive from Las Vegas, NV, to Page, AZ. That’s one way. For this reason alone, you should strongly consider staying overnight in Page, AZ, for optimal safety and enjoyment.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

        1. Patty,
          You are welcome! Hope you have a wonderful time. If you get a minute when you return, write back in and let us know how things went!
          Take care,
          Alley 🙂

  5. Hey Alley! We are planning a camping tour of northern Arizona, starting October 16th. Do you have some campsites you would recommend and advice on closures? We are renting an RV and driving up from Phoenix. Thanks!

    1. Hey Manny,
      If you’re renting an RV, I’d advise staying at campgrounds/RV parks with full hook-ups. In mid-October, daytime temperatures are mostly comfortable, but nighttime temperatures can dip down around/below freezing. You’ll want to have access to reliable heat to ensure a good night’s sleep!
      Assuming you’re going to the Grand Canyon South Rim, developed RV parks in the immediate vicinity are Trailer Village inside the park, and Grand Canyon Camper Village in Tusayan, AZ, 7 miles outside the park.
      Near Horseshoe Bend, there is the Page/Lake Powell Campground in the town of Page, AZ, and the Wahweap Campground inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. There are other places to camp nearby, but they’re mostly dry camping. AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Camping & RV Options Near Antelope Canyon
      Closures to be aware of include, but are not limited to:
      – AZ64 from Desert View Point to Cameron, AZ, on the East Rim of the Grand Canyon; this means that if you go to the South Rim, you’ll then need to detour back through Flagstaff, AZ, before going to Page, AZ. This essentially turns a ~3 hour drive into a 4.5-5 hour drive.
      – The Antelope Canyons – slot canyons still open at this time are Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch and Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT. For more information about touring these slot canyons, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Help! My Tour Got Cancelled
      – Monument Valley Tribal Park – with the exception of Goulding’s Lodge and Forrest Gump Point
      – Four Corners National Monument – completely closed until further notice
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi TL,
          We are very sorry to have to tell you that the Antelope Canyons are closed, and are expected to remain so for the remainder of 2020. If you wish, you can be placed on a priority e-mail list to be notified the minute Antelope Canyon reopens. Visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Closure Alert E-mail
          If your visit is occurring in the near future, and you still wish to visit a slot canyon while you’re here, you’ll be happy to know that there are alternatives not affected by the closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Lands. The most “family-friendly” of these is Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT. Kanab, UT, is ~1 hour drive from Page, AZ, and Red Canyon is a beautiful slot canyon, and an easy walk. The hard part about getting there is the access road in, which a lot of people get stuck on, therefore, a guided tour is strongly recommended. Reputable tour companies who can get you to Peek-A-Boo are:
          – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
          – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
          – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
          – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
          – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
          If you’re up for something more rugged, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. Located off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road, the walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which may be composed of rather deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Since the House Rock Valley Road is also unpaved, and any moisture whatsoever can render it a muddy, impassable mess, a guided tour is recommended for getting your party there and back without incident. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
          – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
          – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
          – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
          Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels!
          Alley 🙂

  6. We are planning to visit horseshoe bend on 17th October 2020. We are not sure if it is open or not? Can anyone who recently. visited can help?

    1. Hey Sam,
      Horseshoe Bend is open, and barring anything completely bizarre, will be on the day of your visit! It was one of the few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed because of COVID-19. One thing you should be aware of, however, is that there is a construction project taking place nearby, that could tack on an extra 15-30 minutes to your drive time. They are building a much-needed dedicated turn lane into the Horseshoe Bend parking lot. Traffic will be managed by flagmen/women in both directions.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  7. Can you see horseshoe bend from a pull off or do you have to hike to see it? We will be going in October and will be passing by it in our travels.

    1. Hi Steven,
      Horseshoe Bend is unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your point of view 😉 not the sort of view you can get a quick glance at on a “drive-by” basis. You have to pull into the parking lot, hike the .7 mile trail to the overlook, then hike the same trail back to the parking lot. We recomend alloting 2 hours time to park, walk out to the rim, take photos, then walk back. Another potential complication: there is a construction project taking place near Horseshoe Bend (building a dedicated turn lane) that could result in delays. If for some reason you or any members of your party are unable to handle the walk to Horseshoe Bend, you might consider flying over it in a fixed wing airplane or helicopter. In just 30 minutes’ time, you can get a bird’s eye view of Horseshoe Bend, Glen Canyon Dam, Lake Powell, and much more! Horseshoe Bend flights depart from the Page Municipal Airport by prior arrangement.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  8. Hi Alley!

    I’ve read through so many of these questions and your response’s, you are incredibly informative! I have been wanting to plan a trip around mid to late October, it will need to be pet friendly as my dog will be joining me. There are a handful of stops I’d like to make, more specifically, Dixie National Forest, Bryce, Zion, Horseshoe Bend, Monument Valley (or at least as much as I can see of it from, I saw you have said that US163 is open) and Grand Canyon South rim. I was just interested in your suggestion of what the order of stops should be, and approximately how many days this trip could be done in. I am coming from California, and thought my first stop would be in St. George and then make the loop down with the Grand Canyon being the last stop. I don’t have many restrictions as far as time/days, I just need to make sure my stops are pet friendly.

    Thank you so much!
    Kristyn

    1. Hi Kristyn!
      The order in which you visit the various attractions you list will depend largely on room availability. Using St. George, UT, as your staging city, you could easily do something like this:
      Day 1 – Day trip from St. George, UT, to Zion National Park (~1 hour drive one way), overnight in St. George
      Day 2 – 2nd trip from St. George, UT, to Zion if you feel as though you missed anything that first day, drive to Brian Head, UT, for overnight
      Day 3 – Spend day in Dixie National Forest area, visit Brian Head, Cedar Breaks National Monument, Duck Creek Village, overnight in Brian Head
      Day 4 – Drive to Bryce Canyon (~90 minutes from Brian Head), overnight in Bryce Canyon area
      Day 5 – Drive from Bryce Canyon to Page, AZ (~3 hours), hike Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos trail on the way, overnight in Page, AZ
      Day 6 – Visit Horseshoe Bend at sunrise, drive to Monument Valley, overnight at Goulding’s Lodge
      Day 7 – Drive from Monument Valley to Grand Canyon South Rim (~5 hour drive IF AZ64 from Cameron to Desert View remains closed; 3.5 hour drive if it is reopened), overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim
      Day 8 – Drive back to CA
      Trip map
      Regarding bringing your dog, hotels within most National Parks do not allow pets, so you will most likely end up staying in gateway communities. You’ll also be limited, in most cases, to staying on paved trails. In Zion, you’ll be limited to seeing what you can by vehicle; the Zion Canyon Shuttle (which is required to utilize to access the scenic drive through that area) does not allow pets, only certified service dogs.
      As you can see, this itinerary can be managed in 7-8 days, but the longer you can spend in each place, the better. Again, it will depend largely on hotel availability in each place. If need be, you could reverse this itinerary, using St. George, UT, as the last stop on your tour. Your trip is just around the corner, and hotel inventory in many towns has been reduced due to COVID-19, so you’d best get some reservations made ASAP!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  9. Hi, we have plans on visiting the horseshoe bend this Sept. 12 (Saturday). Is it open on that day? I have visited the place already before the pandemic so i am familiar with the place. My concern is what are the changes implemented during this pandemic time?

    1. Hi Ernesto,
      Horseshoe Bend is actually one of the few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed or made any major modifications in operations throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. I am not sure when you last visited, but per the article you commented on, a more formal parking lot has been installed, which operates from sunrise to sunset. An entrance fee of $10 per vehicle (standard passenger cars and RV’s) is collected upon entry.
      As for what you might do to protect yourself from exposure to COVID-19, abide by personal hygiene and social distancing protocols as outlined by the WHO and CDC. Although Page, AZ, does not have a mask mandate in place, you are welcome and encouraged to wear a face covering if it helps you feel safer.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hello, I will be there this weekend! I’m hoping to get some good astro shots at the bend. Does the parking lot close at night?

        1. Hi David!
          The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is open from sunrise to sunset. The parking lot typically closes at night, making astrophotography somewhat problematic. Another issue is light pollution; for such a small town, Page, AZ, has a rather sizeable light dome, which spills over to Horseshoe Bend.
          Fortunately, one doesn’t have far to go to get away from all that artificial lighting and see the stars in all their glory. Just 15 miles West on US89 from Page, AZ, is the town of Big Water, Utah. There’s a slightly “off the beaten path” area affectionately known to locals as “The Moon.” That would be a good place to go for star photography, but ONLY if Wahweap Creek, which crosses the unpaved road to that area, has not flooded in recent days. If it has, you could find yourself stuck in the mud in an area that’s pitch black, where cell service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive!
          Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  10. We are coming to visit in late September. Are you able to come to horseshoe bend late at night to take astrophotography pictures?

    1. Hi Doug,
      Horseshoe Bend is open from sunrise to sunset, therefore, astrophotography would be problematic from that particular location.
      Fortunately, you only need to go a short distance away from Page, AZ, to get good nighttime shots, and escape the rather sizeable light dome over the town. 13 miles West of Page, AZ, on US89 is the small town of Big Water, Utah. High cliff faces and moon-like landscapes are sure to compliment your star shots there. You’ll find a lot of dirt roads out there, just be sure that any path you venture onto is not on private property.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  11. Hello! Is Horseshoe Bend open during this time? What are the operating hours? We were hoping to watch the sunset there when we visit later this month and get some good pictures.

  12. Hi Alley,

    My fiancee and I are planning on getting married on Oct 20 at Horseshoe Bend. We were going to do a private tour, but with the Navajo Nation shutdown (and we’re guessing it probably still will be by then) – we will need to go to the public area.

    We were wondering what the crowds have been like there during the past month or so. Our plan was to be there around sunset time (5-6:30pm).
    Do you think that we would have a problem finding an quiet area for ourselves (6 of us total including officiant and photographer). Or has it been pretty busy, and would you suggest postponing until we can do a private tour?

    Also, we saw the note about parking possibly being full… but I guess if that were the case, we could have a driver just drop us off and pick us up later.

    Thanks,
    Jonathan

    1. Dear Jonathan,
      So sorry to hear that your wedding plans are being affected by COVID-19. We have yet to hear whether the Navajo Nation will reopen their attractions by the time you visit. In which case, you should probably prepare for the “worst case scenario” that the closure is extended.
      Crowds at Horseshoe Bend have been lighter than in years past, but still steady. It’s one of the few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed throughout the pandemic. The problem with using the “public” area is that it is technically a part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which means you’d have to get a special use permit from the National Park Service (probably). If all that sounds like a pain, frankly it is, which is why we recommend working with a professional wedding planner who can take care of those arrangements for you. We recommend Monumental Arizona Weddings. They are based in Arizona, have long-standing ties to both the Navajo Nation and Park Service, and we know the owners personally. For more information, call 480-980-8121 or visit http://www.HorseshoeBendWedding.com
      Good luck and happy nuptials,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Thanks Alley.

        We actually already are working with Monument Arizona Weddings – and put together a plan with them to have a private tour of Horseshoe Bend in Navajo Nation. But changing to the public side now since it’s closed. I don’t think they mentioned anything about a special use permit for the public area though. Is this something that would allow us to reserve a specific area?

        1. Hi again, Jonathan,
          To my knowledge, Monumental Arizona Weddings can help you arrange things on the public side of Horseshoe Bend as well. If not, they can at least steer you in the right direction as far as a contact goes.
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hey Scott,
      Pets are welcome at Horseshoe Bend as long as they are leashed at all times. Also, since it’s a desert environment, be sure to bring adequate water for yourself, your pet, and all members of your traveling party.
      If you are visiting during the summer months, remember that sugar sand can get VERY hot. Therefore, we recommend investing in a set of protective booties to keep your dog’s paws nice and cool.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  13. Hello, my wife and I are from Mississippi. We are driving cross country to try to relax after a spring and summer of COVID. Anyway, all I want to do is walk out to Horseshoe Bend and take a pic. Is, or, will Horseshoe Bend be open for me to do that on September 9???? I am getting conflicting info from the internet. And tour companies can’t answer my question because they are CLOSED. I just want to walk out and take a pic. Your info will be appreciated.

    1. Hi Christopher,
      Horseshoe Bend is one of the few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed because of COVID-19.
      The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset. We recommend trying to visit in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  14. Hello,
    I see that there is RV parking for horsebend. Is that correct? If so, how quickly do these spots tend to fill up? We’ll be staying at one of the RV campgrounds near by and are debating towing a car. It seems silly to tow a car just to simply park at horsebend and would like to just drive the RV over to horsebend and park.
    Thank you,
    Nicole

    1. Hey Nicole,
      There are designated parking spots at Horseshoe Bend for RV’s and larger vehicles. During the hours between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM, these tend to fill up more quickly since you’re competing with day trippers and tour buses. Your best chance for visiting Horseshoe Bend with minimal difficulties parking is to get there in the hours just after sunrise. That way, you can take advantage of cooler temperatures, smaller crowds, and less competition for parking.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  15. Hello,

    We are driving from Zion to Page and staying the night. In the morning we will head to the Grand Canyon. I am wondering if gas stations are open in Page? And will they be open along the route to the Grand Canyon?

    Thank you

    1. Hi Sue,
      Gas stations in Page, AZ, are operating as normal, or as close to it as possible under the circumstances. Assuming you are going to Grand Canyon South Rim, gas stations along that route are few and far between until you get to Flagstaff, which you have to make a detour through due to the closure of AZ64 between Cameron, AZ, and Desert View Point (East entrance of Grand Canyon National Park). This means that a drive that would normally take you ~3 hours will take you more along the lines of 4-5 hours.
      Long story short: gas up your vehicle in Page, AZ. Avoid stopping anywhere in the Navajo Reservation (between Page, AZ, and Flagstaff, AZ) as they are discouraging outsiders from interracting with tribal residents to slow the spread of COVID-19.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. Yes they are. Masking is strictly enforced. Traveling the route now. Please be advised that the east rim entrance road is closed and it is recommended that visitors use the south rim entrance accessable through Flagstaff. Happy and safe travels to you all.

  16. I see the parking lot hours are sunrise to sunset. I would like to arrive an hour or so before sunrise. Is there a place to park then?

    1. Hey Fred,
      If you arrive an hour before sunrise, you may find the gate to the parking lot still closed and parking on the side of the road is strictly prohibited. The nearest place you would probably be able to park and wait for awhile is the local Super-Walmart, which is just a few miles up the road.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  17. Hello Alley —
    I’ve visited your area before — which is so beautiful — but never walked out to Horseshoe Bend. My wife and I will be driving through from Flagstaff to Moab in October, towing our shiny Airstream trailer. Any problem parking at Horseshoe Bend parking lot with the trailer? I see photos where people park RVs on the side of the lot, but I imagine that would be subject to vehicle traffic. It’s somewhat maneuverable but if the lot is jam-packed it could be an issue for us for sure. Thanks. (Also, any sense now when the E. entrance to the S. Rim might be re-opened? Or just in a holding pattern now?)

    1. Hi Owen,
      October is a great time to visit the American Southwest! While we are crossing fingers and toes that the East entrance to the Grand Canyon will be open by then, we’re not holding our breath on it. The Navajo Tribe has so far extended the closure of their lands to outsiders 3x now. To keep up to date on the status of this crucial travel route, I recommend bookmarking the National Park Service website for Grand Canyon and checking it frequently in the days leading up to your trip.
      As for parking your shiny Airstream at Horseshoe Bend, there are parking spaces designated for RV’s, so that isn’t a problem, per se. During the busier hours between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM, however, you might find yourself in competition with a lot of like-minded folks, which makes it even harder for those towing a trailer. That’s why we recommend trying to get there in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures (in October, it’s borderline jacket weather, so be ready for that), and smaller crowds. In October, sunrise occurs at around 6:30 AM.
      Hope that helps — good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Thanks so much, Alley. No worries on the East entrance; that’s for when we’re heading from Moab back towards Arizona and have a stay at Grand Canyon Village. We can always use the S. entrance, just a little extra driving. The truly important thing is tribal health and safety.

        As for the RV parking, sounds like I’m going to be making my wife some very early morning coffee in Flagstaff to make Horseshoe Bend by sunrise!

        Cheers,

        Owen

  18. Hi Alley,

    I’ve been reading through your insights for people looking to visit the area and wanted to see if I could trouble you for some information. We’re glad to see that we can visit the Horseshoe Bend – it was one of our preferred stops in the area. Would you happen to know of a resource/website that might tell us what attractions in the area are considered part of the Navajo Nation? Or is there a good resource for major attraction status in the area?

    Any info you might be able to provide would be appreciated.

    1. Hi Will,
      The best resource for information on the status of Navajo Nation Tribal Parks is their official website, NavajoNationParks.org All Navajo Reservation lands are currently closed to outsiders until August 31st, with the notable exception of Goulding’s Lodge in Monument Valley. Don’t ask me how, but they’ve managed to stay open.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  19. Hi Alley,
    We are planing to visit Horseshoe bend in beginning of September and we want to take our one years old baby with us 🙂 Do you think is it good idea? And also, should we make reservation/tour ahead? Or we can visit Horseshoe bend without guide?

    1. Hi Madina!
      You are welcome to bring your little ones to Horseshoe Bend, as long as you are aware of a few important things:
      There is a fenced viewing platform available, but it only encompasses a small portion of Horseshoe Bend Overlook’s total “real estate.” The rest of the viewing area is unfenced, and it’s a 700′ drop to the Colorado River! If your child has begun walking, please be sure they are under your control at all times. By the way, if you prefer to transport your baby in a stroller, you’ll be glad to know that the trail to Horseshoe Bend is now accessible to wheelchairs and other mobility aids. Video
      Be aware that you are in a desert environment, and daytime high temperatures can and do get up around 110 degrees (Fahrenheit), even in September. That’s why we recommend, if at all possible, that you visit in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
      Again, you’re in a desert environment, so be sure that you bring enough water for yourself, your baby, and all members of your traveling party.
      Horseshoe Bend does not require a guide to visit. The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, so you can simply go at your convenience, at any point during that timeframe.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  20. Hi Alley! Hope all is well! I loved reading all of your responses.
    I will be driving from Las Vegas to the Grand Canyon on August 14th with my boyfriend. We plan on driving to Grand Canyon (south rim since I see East rim is closed) and then want to see horse shoe bend (or first horse shoe bend then Grand Canyon) we are staying in Sedona at the enchantment resort so do you think it’s possible to do the Grand Canyon and horse shoe bend in one day? We want to do things in Sedona as well like cathedral rock devils bridge Boynton canyon vortex so I am trying to coordinate our itinerary if you can help me out! Thank you!
    Carolina

    1. Hi Carolina,
      This is a good question, unfortunately, the answer is “no,” it’s not feasible to visit the Grand Canyon and Horseshoe Bend in a single day. You need to allot 2 separate days for each attraction.
      It takes approximately 3 hours to drive from Sedona, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim. You should allow for a full day to explore the park, even though some facilities are closed. You then have to deal with the 3 hour drive back to Sedona, and you want to be sure that you’re ‘back to base’ by nightfall. That drive takes place on some very dimly lit stretches of road, and the drive down Oak Creek Canyon between Flagstaff and Sedona is very windy/twisty. Another potential hazard is the presence of deer, elk, and other large animals such as free range cattle and wild horses. You don’t want to risk a close encounter with one in an area that’s pitch black, with spotty cell phone reception, and where help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. On August 14th, sunrise occurs at 5:46 AM and sunset takes place around 7:15 PM. You should be on the road heading back to Sedona by 4:30 PM at the absolute latest.
      On a separate day, the drive from Sedona to Page, AZ, will also take approximately 3 hours. Since a large chunk of the drive will take you through Navajo Indian Tribal Lands, you should know that they discourage outsiders interracting with tribal residents, so be sure your vehicle is gassed up, and that you have basic supplies such as water and snacks purchased ahead of time. Allow approximately 2 hours to park at Horsehoe Bend, walk to the overlook, take photos and walk back to the parking lot. Under normal circumstances, I’d say book an Antelope Canyon tour, but unfortunately, these attractions are also on Navajo Indian Land, hence, they are closed. Other ways you might occupy your time while in Page, AZ, include, but certainly aren’t limited to:
      – A walk along the Page Rim View Trail
      – A scenic fixed wing airplane flight over Lake Powell
      Hike the “New Wave” trail to Radio Tower Rock
      – Enjoy a dip in Lake Powell at The Chains, maybe hike to the Hanging Gardens area as well
      – Shoot a few rounds at Gunfighter Canyon Indoor Shooting Range
      Again, be sure you’re on the road headed back to Sedona, AZ, no later than 4:30 PM. If you fancy getting an earlier start back, you might consider swinging over to the Lees Ferry/Marble Canyon area and enjoying a late lunch/early dinner at the Cliff Dweller’s Restaurant. It’s one of Northern Arizona’s “hidden gem” restaurants! It’s ~1 hour from Page, then Sedona, AZ, would be a further 3 hour drive.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  21. Hey Alley,

    Do you know if Antelope Canyon is still closed? If it is closed, are there any comparable canyons to see for two active adults. Also, we want to do the walk across the Glen Canyon Dam Bridge do you know where we should park? If there is anything else to see/do or places to eat that you recommend please share

    1. Hi Jay,
      Sorry to tell you that yes, the Antelope Canyons are still closed and will remain so through the end of August at the earliest.
      However, there are comparable slot canyons in the semi-immediate vicinity that are not subject to the closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Lands! The main ones we recommend are Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, or Wire Pass Canyon, both near Kanab, UT. For more information on these, check out this piece on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: “Help! My Antelope Canyon Tour Got Cancelled
      As for where you should park to walk across the Glen Canyon Dam Bridge, there are two options: one at the Carl Hayden Visitors Center on the dam’s Western flank, one near the local swimming area known as “The Chains” on the Eastern flank. You might choose the latter option if you’re hot after the walk and wish to take a refreshing dip in Lake Powell. You could also piggy-back that with a short hike to the Hanging Gardens Area.
      Other activities you might consider while in the area include, but aren’t limited to:
      – A walk along the Page Rim View Trail
      – A kayak tour of Lone Rock Canyon
      – A scenic fixed wing airplane flight over Lake Powell or Monument Valley
      – Hike the “New Wave” trail to Radio Tower Rock
      – Drive down to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam and paddle 15 miles through Glen Canyon back to Lees Ferry! KayakHorseshoeBend.com
      – Shoot a few rounds at Gunfighter Canyon Indoor Shooting Range
      Regarding good places to eat, you can take your pick of everything from fast-food to higher-end offerings. Services may be limited to outdoor or take-out due to COVID-19, so be sure to verify what’s available before you get your family all psyched for it. For suggestions based on recent experiences, check out “The Wandering Road” blog for specific recommendations for breakfast, lunch, and dinner in Page, AZ!
      Now, if you’re open to taking a little trip to visit a wonderful restaurant that’s a bit off the beaten path, near the Lees Ferry/Marble Canyon area, you’ll find the Cliff Dweller’s Lodge. At first glance, it looks to be just a little “hole in the wall,” but in addition to an amazing view, you’ll find surprisingly sophisticated cuisine for such a remote location. It’s ~1 hour’s drive (one way) from Page, AZ, but well worth the trip.
      Hope that helps.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  22. is this open now due to COVID and are there any other restrictions in place? also-do you know if the horse trail ride tours are still available? I cannot get a hold of anyone however from the the website it looks like they are still open and booking? thanks for your help, Veronica

    1. Hi Veronica,
      To coin a phrase, there’s good news and bad news:
      The good news: Horseshoe Bend is open! It’s one of the few local attractions that never closed during COVID-19. We simply ask that you observe social distancing and personal hygiene guidelines as you would anywhere else.
      The bad news: Horseshoe Bend Trail rides are closed. All attractions and activities on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands, including the Antelope Canyons, are off-limits to outsiders until further notice by executive order of the Navajo Indian Tribe.
      If you’re interested in doing some horseback riding, you might head over to Zion National Park (~90 minutes from Page, AZ) and hook up with Canyon Trail Rides. They offer 1-hour and 3-hour rides through some breathtaking country, and while previous riding experience is not required, advance reservations are strongly recommended.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Garrison,
          Yes, you can bring your dog to Horseshoe Bend! Just make sure they are leashed at all times, and that you bring enough water for yourself and your dog. Also, if you’re visiting in the summertime, you might want to invest in a set of protective booties for your dog’s paws. The trail and surrounding terrain can get VERY hot and burn your pet’s feet. We wouldn’t want to see that happen!
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Gibby!
      The walk from the Horseshoe Bend parking lot to the overlook is .7 miles, or 1.4 miles round-trip. The average visitor takes anywhere from 90 minutes to 2 hours to walk to the rim, take photos, then walk back to their vehicle.
      As for whether it’s safe to park there, we have not heard any reports of theft or other malicious acts, but encourage you to take the precautions you normally would at home: lock your vehicle, roll up your windows, don’t leave valuables such as money or jewelry in the vehicle, and store anything you don’t take with you to the overlook in the trunk of your vehicle, or leave it at your hotel.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Sandy,
      Unfortunately, the America The Beautiful Federal Lands Access Pass does not work at Horseshoe Bend. The parking lot is managed by the City of Page, so you would need to pay an entrance fee of $10/car or RV or $35/light commercial vehicle.
      The pass is also not valid at the Antelope Canyons since it is a Native American Tribal Park. The Antelope Canyons are closed at the moment due to COVID-19.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  23. Hi Alley. I drive a semi truck aka 18 wheeler.. Can I park there at the parking lot for about 30 minutes to take pictures and if so, how much would it cost? If not, wheres the closest I can park? Thank you!!

    1. Hi Xavier,
      This is a really good question, and unfortunately, the answer — I’m ~95% certain anyway — is “no.” There are some turns in the parking lot that may be difficult for a semi to navigate. Another complication is that there are no places to park that can accommodate an 18-wheeler within reasonable walking distance of Horseshoe Bend. Normally, I’d suggest you contact Horseshoe Bend Tours to book a shuttle to the overlook, but this service has been temporarily discontinued due to COVID-19.
      The best I can tell you is to postpone your visit for another time when you are driving a standard passenger vehicle or RV to the area. Horseshoe Bend Parking Fees are as follows:
      – Motorcycle: $5
      – Car or RV: $10
      – Commercial Van/Bus: (Passenger Capacity up to 14) $35
      – Commercial Bus: (Passenger Capacity 15-35) $70
      – Commercial Bus: (Passenger Capacity over 35) $140
      Entrance fees are based on the passenger capacity of the vehicle, not the number of passengers. There is absolutely no parking anywhere along US Highway 89, as this is a 65 mph highway, and vehicles will be ticketed and towed. Passenger drop-offs and pickups at the Horseshoe Bend entrance or along the Highway 89 corridor are also prohibited.
      If you’d like to discuss this with the authorities responsible for the parking lot and fee collection, please contact the City of Page at (928) 645-8861.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  24. I read that you are open every day from sunrise to sunset. So your parking lot hours actually change from day to day? We are planning to drive in from Kanab in a week to watch the sunrise, and just don’t want to be sitting there waiting for the lot to open for a half hour. Is there somewhere I can find a more precise time? Or just, if the sun rises at 5:17, that’s when you open….. THank you. I have enjoyed all our responses and found out more information about traveling right now through northern AZ than on ANy other site!

    1. Hi Mary,
      They probably don’t change from day to day, they allow for a small “window” of time prior to sunrise and just after sunset. If you want to be 100% certain of what time to be at the parking lot, however, the best source for that information is the City of Page, AZ. They are the current entity in charge of running the parking lot and collecting entrance fees. Visit http://www.CityofPage.org/Horseshoe Bend or phone 928-645-8861.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  25. Hi alley,
    My fiancé and I want to do a small wedding ceremony (less than 20 people, less than an hour) in northern arizona later this year in October. Do we need to go through a tour guide/company to do so, or can we just purchase a special events permit like the grand canyon does?
    Thanks

    1. Hi Andrea, and congratulations on your upcoming nuptials!
      While it is not necessary to go through a tour guide or professional wedding planner to get married at Horseshoe Bend, it can certainly save a lot of hassle for you. Bare minimum, you’d have to arrange for a special use permit through the National Park Service, similar to the requirement at the Grand Canyon, plus get a local marriage license, officiant, etc. If you do decide to employ a professional wedding planner, we recommend Monumental Arizona Weddings. We know the owners personally, and they know the in’s and out’s of doing special events in locations such as Horseshoe Bend, Grand Canyon, Tower Butte, Lake Powell, and much more. For more information, visit http://www.HorseshoeBendWedding.com
      Good luck, safe travels, and have a beautiful wedding! If you have some time afterward, let us know how it went.
      Alley 🙂

  26. Hello Alley,
    I was wondering how accessible the trail from the parking lot to horse shoe bend is? Before I came on your site I wasn’t aware there was a trail to the view of horse shoe bend :), one of our friends has a fractured foot so I was wondering if maybe if she took a walker she would be fine? My question might be a little silly but we’re exploring all options to try to make it work hehe I would truly appreciate your outlook, thank you so much!

    1. Hi Estela!
      No such thing as a silly question around here 😉
      The trail to the Horseshoe Bend Overlook from the parking lot is ~.7 miles one way, which means almost a 1.5 mile round-trip walk. While it is partially paved and graded to be flatter than in years past, the distance alone may be somewhat prohibitive for your friend with the fractured foot. She may wish to consider alternative means of seeing Horseshoe Bend, such as flying over it in an airplane or helicopter. Air tours depart from the Page, AZ, Municipal Airport daily, weather permitting and contingent on a certain number of passengers booking. Heck, that could be fun for the whole family! Horseshoe Bend Air Tours
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  27. Hi Alley,

    We are planning a trip for the end of September, and are wanting to stay the night and camp at Horseshoe Bend. Are we able to park there and camp by the bend as dispersed camping/free? I can’t find anything that directly says yes or no, just other actual campgrounds. I don’t think we want to do the camping at Lake Powell where you have to take a boat over. Any other recommendations would be helpful!

    We are doing a trip of Hoover Dam, Grand Canyon, Horseshoe Bend, and Zion!

    Thanks!

    1. Hi Britt,
      Camping is forbidden at Horseshoe Bend. Dispersed camping/boondocking is plentiful on BLM land near Page, AZ, but these opportunities are located on the far outskirts of Lake Powell, anywhere from 30 minutes to 1 hour’s drive away. The Stateline Campground off US89 on the House Rock Valley Road is a particularly nice one, but you may have competition for first-come/first-serve spaces from hikers to the Wave, Wire Pass, Buckskin Gulch and other popular areas. Another word of caution is that the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved, so if you’re in a rental car, we discourage you from attempting it.
      If you prefer to be closer to Horseshoe Bend, overnight parking is allowed at Page, AZ’s Wal-Mart Super Center, just a few minutes away from Horseshoe Bend, but you are limited to staying only 1 night and are not allowed to pitch a tent, use BBQ grills, or make any other indication that you’re intending to set up camp for longer than 24 hours.
      Just to clarify, improved campgrounds at Lake Powell do not require that you take a boat to them. Campgrounds with vehicular access are available at the Beehives, Wahweap Campground, and Lone Rock Beach. These are not free campgrounds, but at least the latter two give you access to some amenities (restrooms, etc.). Beehive is dry camping, has picnic tables, but no restrooms, so you have to pack in and pack out all waste.
      For more information on campgrounds and RV parks in the Page, AZ, area, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Camping & RV Options
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  28. Are you still able to drive through the reservation to get to Horseshoe bend correct? Will be coming up through Flagstaff.

    1. Hey Ronald,
      Yes, you can drive US89 from Flagstaff, AZ, to Page, AZ, to visit Horseshoe Bend, even though it does go through the reservation. That highway is still a very important shipping corridor, so closure is not an option in that case. If you do pass through the Navajo Reservation, they ask that you avoid stopping there. If you must patronize any businesses within their borders, please wear a mask in order to protect the citizens of this area, who have been hit disproportionately hard by COVID-19.
      The section of AZ64 from Desert View Point (Eastern boundary of Grand Canyon National Park) to Cameron, AZ, remains closed.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Dear Linh,
          It sure is! Horseshoe Bend is one of a few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed. Parking lot hours are sunrise to sunset, 7 days a week. At this time of year, we recommend visiting just after sunrise to enjoy cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

          1. Hey Alley,
            How are you? Do you know if US 163 is open? where we can see monument valley from the road ?

          2. Hi Jessica,
            I’m great, thanks for asking!
            Although the Navajo Nation has closed their tribal lands and popular attractions to outsiders, US163 through Monument Valley remains open. You can actually see quite a bit of Monument Valley once you get a few miles North of Kayenta, AZ, including world-famous Forrest Gump Point. The Navajo Tribe asks that if you must exit your vehicle at any time during the drive, that you wear a mask, and try to avoid interracting with tribe members if at all possible, with the exception of Goulding’s Lodge, which remains open for business. That means gas up your vehicle, pack snacks or a lunch, and bring enough water for yourself and all other members of your traveling party.
            If the prospect of driving through Monument Valley does not appeal for whatever reason, you might consider flying over it in a fixed-wing airplane or helicopter from Page, AZ, Municipal Airport. For more information on Monument Valley Air Tours, visit http://www.WestwindAirService.com
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

      1. Hey Alley,

        Are we able to do the scenic drive on highway 163 through Monuments? I’ve heard conflicting information

        1. Hi Emily,
          US163 from Kayenta, AZ, to Bluff, UT, remains open. However, the 17-mile unpaved scenic loop drive through Monument Valley remains closed per executive order of the Navajo Tribe. Fortunately, a great view of Monument Valley can be enjoyed simply driving past it on US163. In general, the tribe asks that all non-reservation residents driving through avoid stopping and interracting with tribe members. If you must exit your vehicle and patronize a business, they ask that you wear a mask while conducting your business. One exception to the rule: Goulding’s Lodge has opted to remain open, and are operating tours using alternate routes.
          Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

        2. Hi Alley!

          We are going to be coming from Vegas and stopping at the Grand Canyon south rim and then wanted to go to Horseshoe bend the next day and then drive out past Monument Valley. Is this possible and what would be the best route currently?

          1. Hi Jenna,
            Traveling from Grand Canyon South Rim to Horseshoe Bend, then onto Monument Valley is possible, but not terribly practical right now.
            Due to the disproportionately high occurrence of COVID-19 on the Navajo Indian Reservation, a crucial component of the driving route from the South Rim to Page, AZ — AZ64 from Desert View Point to Cameron, AZ — is closed off right now. This means that to travel from Grand Canyon South Rim to Horseshoe Bend, you have to drive all the way back to Flagstaff, AZ, then proceed North up US89 to Page, AZ. This turns what is normally a ~3-hour drive into a ~5-hour drive. Therefore, you’ll probably want to plan on staying overnight in Page, AZ, before heading off to Monument Valley, which is another 2+ hour drive.
            In Monument Valley itself, you’ll find the majority of businesses closed due to COVID-19, with the notable exception of Goulding’s Lodge. Otherwise, you should plan to have a full tank of gas, and take enough water and food with you so that you don’t have to stop on the reservation and risk interracting with tribe members. If you do, please be sure to mask up and clean your hands before entering any businesses or public facilities.
            Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

      2. Hello!

        We will be visiting/staying in Flagstaff 7/27 through 8/2. We are very interested and excited to see Horseshoe Bend. However there is a lot of conflicting info about Navajo/roads being closed. Can we still visit Horseshoe from Flagstaff? Thank you very much.

        1. Hi Carol!
          Sorry that you’re getting so many conflicting reports of road closures on the Navajo Reservation. The truth is, AZ64 from Cameron, AZ, to the Eastern entrance of Grand Canyon National Park (Desert View Point) is closed. However, US89 from Flagstaff, AZ, to Page, AZ, is open. It still passes through Navajo Indian Tribal Lands, but is a very important shipping corridor, so closure is not an option in that case. The Navajo Tribe still asks that you avoid stopping on their land, especially if it involves patronizing any businesses and/or interracting with tribe members. If for some reason you do have to stop, they ask that you wear a mask. It really shouldn’t be necessary to stop there since there are plenty of gas stations in Flagstaff, AZ, and Page, AZ.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

      3. Do I have to make reservation to drive from Sedona to Horseshoe bend? If yes, where do I make the reservation at? Thank you,

        1. Hi Angie,
          A reservation is not necessary to visit Horseshoe Bend. You simply go at your leisure, anytime between sunrise and sunset. Be sure to allow 90 minutes to 2 hours to park, walk to the overlook, take photos, and walk back.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  29. Hello Alley,

    I am visiting Phoenix next week and was planning to visit Horseshoe Bend (probably July 2nd or 3rd) since it has been a life long dream of mine. I’ve read several of your comments thoroughly and wanted to ask additional questions;

    First off, do you think July 3rd will be super busy since 4th is observed on that day? or do you think July 2nd and 3rd will be pretty similar as to how busy it might get? July 3rd is our ideal day to visit but if 2nd is less busy, we wanted to come that day to avoid huge crowds.

    When visiting, I’ve seen that you recommend spending the night at Page since driving back to Phoenix in the dark is highly not recommended but we only have one day to do this trip so here is our itinerary. Getting a rental car in Phoenix early morning (probably around 5/6am), get to Horseshoe Bend around noon (will limit stops and pack food to eat during the drive), spend 2-3 hours at Horseshoe Bend, leave around 4/5pm, hopefully at least reach Flagstaff before it gets dark (since the sun sets around 7:50pm) and then get dinner in Flagstaff and drive back in the dark to Phoenix. Does this kind of schedule sound possible? Is it okay to drive in the dark from Flagstaff to Phoenix? If not, do you have a timeline for someone driving from Phoenix that has to do it in one day but as safely as possible? I was super excited to visit Horseshoe Bend but reading about how it gets really dark after sunset and the fact that theres barely any cell service (I have T-mobile which doesn’t have the best coverage area to begin with lol) got me a little spooked. I would greatly appreciate your input.

    Also, I saw that in a comment left back in May how the parking fee at Horseshoe Bend is waived during that time, is it still waived? or is the parking fee back now?

    Thank you so much and looking forward to your reply.

    1. Hi Steven,
      Parking fees are being collected once again at Horseshoe Bend, last I heard, through an automated payment system, but that could have changed.
      As for which day will be busiest, it tends to be six-of-one/half-a-dozen-of another on any summer day, but the 4th of July itself tends to be busier due to Page, AZ’s world-famous fireworks show. If you’re wanting to avoid crowds, you might indeed consider visiting on the 2nd, 3rd, or 5th, but realistically, don’t expect it to be a ghost town. It’s still summer, after all.
      Due to the relatively long daylengths in July, a day trip from Phoenix is more feasible at this time of year than any other. Still, the plan to drive as far as Flagstaff, AZ, and spend the night is probably prudent. Once you get done at Horseshoe Bend, you’ll probably find other sights in the area that pique your curiosity, even though the Antelope Canyons are closed. You might head down to the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge and talk a walk across it, or enjoy a quick swim at The Chains, which can easily be dovetailed with a walk to the Hanging Gardens area (although the springs are probably dry).
      If you really prefer to get back to Phoenix that same day, the stretch between Flagstaff and Phoenix tends to be a bit more brightly lit than the highway between Page and Flagstaff. From Flag to Phoenix is interstate, whereas from Page to Flag (that’s what we call it around here) is a two-lane, regional thoroughfare that also passes through the Navajo Reservation, which is closed to outsiders. Since the drive from Page, AZ, to Flag takes ~2.5-3 hours, I’d strongly recommend leaving Page, AZ, no later than 5:00 PM.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  30. Hi Alley,
    We are coming to Page, AZ on July 14th and had planned on doing Horseshoe Bend, Lower Antelope Canyon and Lake Powell. Unfortunately, I will anticipate that the Antelope Canyons will be closed at that time. Can you recommend a tour for our family of two adults and 4 children that is similar to Antelope Canyon but can be done in 2-4 hours? Thanks!

    1. Hi Divora,
      So sorry that the Antelope Canyons will most likely be closed at the time of your visit to Page, AZ. However, the Navajo Tribe has been hit particularly hard by COVID-19, so we are behind them 100% on this.
      The good news is that there are other slot canyons near Page, AZ, that offer beautiful scenery and family-friendly adventure, but are not bound by the closures of Navajo Indian Land. Since I’m assuming that your kids are relatively young, Red Canyon aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon (not to be confused with Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Escalante, UT!) would be the one I’d recommend. This beautiful slot canyon, with twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, is located near Kanab, UT, ~1 hour from Page, AZ. It’s a short but memorable walk featuring classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you utiize one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. There are several reputable companies to choose from in Kanab, UT, including:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermillioncliffs.net
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  31. Hi Alley, my girlfriend and I will be visiting Page this weekend. And I was just wondering if there were hours that the parking lot is open or is it always open? Thanks!

    1. Hi Mike,
      The Horseshoe Bend parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset 7 days a week. During the hot days of summer, we recommend visiting just after sunrise to enjoy cooler temperatures and smaller crowds!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Lisa,
          The smoke from the Mangum Fire is pretty thick in the Page, AZ, area, and I’ve even heard reports of falling ash from local residents. There are other wildfires in and around Northern Arizona that could make matters worse. As for whether or not you visit, that’s up to you, but if you have respiratory issues or smoke sensitivity, you might want to reschedule your trip.
          For the latest reports about the fire, visit LakePowellLife.com or the Page, AZ, Community Bulletin Board on Facebook. WildlandFiresSmoke.net is also a handy site to bookmark.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

      1. Horseshoe Bend is open, correct?
        Any Antelope tours taking place yet? Our Vegas trip is still on for July and we had a float trip planned for Horseshoe Bend. But, it was canceled in late March. We always rent and travel 100s of miles to sightsee while in Vegas. Any ideas what to do around the area of Page is the tours don’t open? Thanks much!!

        1. Hi Heather!
          The good news: Horseshoe Bend is open. It is one of the few attractions in the area that never closed. You can visit between the hours of sunrise and sunset, although we recommend hitting the overlook in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
          As for the Antelope Canyons, unfortunately, they are closed, and probably will remain so beyond their planned reopening date of July 6th, but that has yet to be confirmed. Fortunately, you’ll find plenty to see and do in and around Page, AZ, so that your visit will by no means be for naught.
          If a slot canyon was on your wish list, you’ll be happy to know that there are several slot canyons near the “town next door,” Kanab, UT, that are not on Navajo Reservation land and therefore not bound by their closure. Not knowing the makeup of your party (kids? seniors? everyone in pretty good shape or not so much?), I’ll begin by recommending Red Canyon aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon (not to be confused with another Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Escalante, UT!). This family-friendly slot canyon is located between Kanab and Mt. Carmel Junction, Utah, approximately 90 minutes from Page, AZ. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you consider taking one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. There are several reputable tour companies to choose from in Kanab, UT, including:
          – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
          – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
          – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
          – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
          – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermillioncliffs.net
          If you think you can handle something a little more adventurous, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch (the Grand-Daddy of all slot canyons!). The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which may present the challenge of deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
          – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
          – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
          – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
          Of course, no visit to Page, AZ, would be complete without a swim in Lake Powell. Fortunately, there are several areas where you can enjoy a refreshing dip. The closest area to Page, AZ, is The Chains, which is on the East flank of the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge. It’s a bit of a hike to get down to the water, and back up again, but the nice thing about this area is that you don’t have to pay an entrance fee. If desired, you can also “piggy-back” this with a hike to the Hanging Gardens area. Remember that in July, it will be very hot, so any labor-intensive activities should be undertaken during the early morning hours. Sun protection (hats, sunglasses, sunscreen) must be carried and/or worn, and water is a definite must for your day pack!
          If you’re OK with paying the entrance fee to the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, the Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach are both good places to swim. The Wahweap Swim Beach has shaded picnic tables with grills nearby. Lone Rock Beach does not have these amenities, and is very sandy, so be sure to keep to the graded/improved areas so you don’t get your vehicle stuck. Another thing to keep in mind about all 3 areas is that Lake Powell is a popular boating destination. The water may be quite choppy if a lot of boats, jet skis, etc., are out and about.
          Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi O A,
      The GPS coordinates of Horseshoe Bend are 36.8792° N, 111.5104° W, but honestly, you don’t need these or a physical address to find this world-famous landmark!
      The parking area is located near mile marker 545 on highway US89, approximately 5 miles South of the town of Page, AZ. It is very well-signed and easy to find. You literally can’t miss it. Just look for all the cars.
      Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  32. Hi Alley! I just wanted to thank you for being so helpful. We are leaving tomorrow to head out that way and will be spending a lot of time in the surrounding area, including one night in Page. For us planners, this year has created a serious challenge, as information for a lot of places has been hard to come by. I’ve even taken to calling local businesses to see what they’re hearing and even befriended an employee at one of the parks I came across on Facebook to try to get good intel. Thankfully our trip has come together pretty well and other than the Navajo attractions, most everything will be open enough for us to visit as planned. But you are totally on top of it and the job you do and information you provide is so very helpful and appreciated by myself and countless others who come across this site. Can’t wait to see your beautiful area – keep up the great work!!

    1. Dear James,
      Wow, your compliments totally made my day, and it’s still early! LOL
      You are spot-on in your observation that between COVID-19 and everything else going on in the world, vacation planning has been… shall we say, an interesting exercise.
      While it’s a huge bummer that the Navajo lands-based attractions, particularly the Antelope Canyons, are closed, there are several slot canyons in the local area that are not situated on reservation lands. The closest ones are Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch, located off US89 down the House Rock Valley Road between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT; and Peek-a-Boo Canyon aka Red Canyon, near Kanab, UT, down BLM Road #102 off US89. While neither of these technically require a guided tour to visit, we strongly recommend taking one since both access routes are unpaved and visitors in rental cars would void their insurance by driving off-road.
      For Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch Tours, contact one of the following licensed guide services:
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      For Red/Peek-A-Boo Canyon, contact:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      Good luck, safe travels, and if you have some time when you get home, we’d love to hear how your trip went!
      Take care,
      Alley 🙂

  33. Hi Alley,

    My family (me, husband and our 6 year old twin boys) are camping at the Wahweap campground this weekend and are wanting to visit horseshoe bend on Monday, 6/15/20. What is the best time to get there? How much time should we save to spend at horseshoe bend since we are hoping to visit other places that same day as well. Where do we park? Do you have any other recommendations for things to do and see (kids/family friendly) around the area that we do that day as well? Thank you so much for your help =).

    1. Hi Tiffany!
      The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is open from sunrise (~5:00 AM) to sunset (~7:45 PM). Because daytime high temperatures in Page, AZ, are getting up around 100 degrees Fahrenheit these days, we recommend that you try and visit in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. 90 minutes to 2 hours is the average time people take to park, hike out to the rim, take a few photos and hike back. The parking area is very well-marked and easy to spot, located near mile marker 545 on US89, about 5 miles South of Page, AZ.
      As for other things you might do in the area, unfortunately, the Antelope Canyons and the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip remain closed due to COVID-19, but popular swimming areas such as The Chains, Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach are open and would make for a fun way to round out your day. The Chains is located outside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so no entrance fee is required; Wahweap Swim Beach and Lone Rock Beach are both located inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so an entrance fee is required to visit those areas. Again, sun exposure is an important consideration at these areas, so be prepared to protect yourself and your family with plenty of sunscreen, water, hats, protective clothing, etc.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  34. Hello-
    My family and I were thinking of coming for sunrise on June 11. So about what time should we arrive? Thanks so much!

    1. Hi Kim,
      Sunrise in June takes place around 5:00 AM. We definitely recommend getting there at sunrise or shortly after to take advantage of cooler temperatures and fewer people!
      Alley 🙂

  35. Hi Alley, my family and I (consist of 3 RV’s) are driving through Horseshoe bend and Antelope Canyon(after Bryce Canyon)this coming July 4th. I called Navaho Tours and the lady said their not open for tours yet and she heard not until August of 2020. This leave’s us just Horseshoe bend. Do we need to purchase ticket ahead for us to even park there? I have 2 seniors that cannot walk that far but wanted to see the edge of horseshoe bend. How can I fulfill these life long bucket list of theirs?

    1. Hi Dennis,
      Wow, all the way until August, huh? I’d recommend waiting on official word from the Navajo Tribe before jumping to conclusions, but there’s no denying the fact that the Navajo Tribe has been hit extremely hard by COVID-19. If that’s what they need to do, we’re totally behind them.
      The good news? There are other slot canyons in the area that are family-friendly and are not dependent on the Navajo Reservation reopening. For your group, I’d recommend Peek-A-Boo Canyon, aka Red Canyon, near Kanab, UT, about 1 hour from Page, AZ. While you technically don’t require a guided tour to go there, I strongly recommend that you use one. The drive there is very difficult, and definitely not meant for RV’s! Dreamland Safari Tours is a licensed, and very reputable outfitter that we have no problem recommending. TC Tours is another located in that same area; I am not personally familiar with them, but they seem to be well-rated.
      As for Horseshoe Bend, you do not need to purchase tickets ahead of time. In fact, I don’t even think that’s possible — not yet, anyway. As for whether the seniors in the group can handle it, we see seniors successfully make this walk every day, and leave much younger people in the dust! The trail to the Horseshoe Bend overlook is ~1.4 miles round-trip. It has recently been graded so it is flatter than the ‘social’ trail from years past. However, the time of year that you’re visiting is hot, and the trail offers very little in the way of shade, so try to time your visit for the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Realize that it’s not a race; you can take the trail as slowly as you wish, and you might have a better time and learn a lot more by doing so! Horseshoe Bend: The Intimate Grand Canyon Experience Whenever you decide to go, be sure to carry enough water for all members of your party.
      If for some reason you decide that these folks cannot make the hike to Horseshoe Bend, there might still be another way for them to see it, without so much exertion: fly over it. Airplanes and helicopters depart daily from the Page, AZ, Municipal Airport. They won’t land at the overlook, but they’ll get to see a lot of amazing scenery in addition to Horseshoe Bend! Horseshoe Bend Air Tour
      Hope that helps. Good luck, safe travels, and if you have time afterward, we’d love to know how things went!
      Take care,
      Alley 🙂

  36. Hi Alley!
    We are planning to visit Page (coming from LA to Vegas and then to Page and Bryce Canyon) with our children – twins aged 6 and toddler aged 3 – this weekend.
    Is the horseshoe band trail will be difficult for them?
    What other attractions are available this weekend for kids around Page and lake Powell by car in your opinion?
    Is Page restaurants etc. are open?
    Thank you in advance!
    Hezzy

    1. Hi Hezzy!
      Only you can judge whether the hike to Horseshoe Bend will be too much for your kids. I’ve seen some kids need to be carried most of the way, I’ve seen others outpace their parents! I can tell you the following:
      1. The trail to the Horseshoe Bend overlook is ~1.4 miles round-trip. It has recently been graded so it is flatter than the ‘social’ trail from years past.
      2. This time of year is hot, and the trail offers very little in the way of shade, so try to time your visit for the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
      3. Realize that it’s not a race; you can take the trail as slowly as you wish, and you might learn a lot more by doing so! Horseshoe Bend: The Intimate Grand Canyon Experience
      3. Whenever you decide to go, be sure to carry enough water for all members of your party
      As for attractions that can be visited around Lake Powell, there are several! You might try to visit The Chains, and maybe piggy-back that onto a hike to the Hanging Gardens. Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach would also be fun; these are both located inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so an entrance fee is required. You can visit The Chains for free. Whatever you decide, be sure to keep a close eye on the kids and bring some floaties for their safety! You can purchase these at the local Super Wal-Mart if needed.
      Many Page, AZ, restaurants are open, but may be serving at limited capacity due to COVID-19.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

      1. Thank you very much!
        Is the Glen Canyon dam open for visitors? and if so is it possible to get there by car rather than a hike?
        Thanks again!

  37. Is it currently possible to buy the “America the Beautiful” pass when entering the horseshoe bend park? If not, where can it be bought other than online?

    1. Hey Simon!
      This is an excellent question — since Horseshoe Bend is administered by the City of Page, AZ, it is not possible to buy the America the Beautiful Pass there. However, if you’re planning on going to the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (Lake Powell), you can pick it up there, as well as at the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and other popular National Parks in the Grand Circle.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  38. Hello Alley,
    For my sons 34th birthday he invited us (mom, dad, siblings) to a road trip that includes a day to enjoy Horseshoe bend and play in the water. The general itinerary was to be in Paige NLT Friday June 26 early morning and planned to split the day between Horseshoe bend, Antelope Canyon, and Lake Powell. This assumes that Antelope is open by then and I’m able to get a reservation. Is there access from the scenic view to get to the water via e-bikes? If not, what are the options available to swim Horseshoe bend? We are leaving Saturday morning and heading to Sedona to spend the weekend at Devil’s Bridge Trail and Oak creek and heading back to San Diego and Ventura, CA Monday.
    I appreciate your time and all the useful responses you’ve provided everyone.
    Thank you.
    Grace

    1. Hi Grace,
      This is a good question; unfortunately, the answer is “no,” there is no access from the Horseshoe Bend Overlook to the Colorado River. You can access the Colorado River for swimming at Lees Ferry, which is ~1 hour drive from Page, AZ. Time/desire permitting, you might also rent a kayak and get backhauled from Lees Ferry to the Glen Canyon Dam, where you could float back down to Lees Ferry through Horseshoe Bend. Kayak Horseshoe Bend
      If that is not feasible, your best option for swimming would be to go to Lake Powell. There are a few good swimming spots about 15 minutes drive from Horseshoe Bend:
      The Chains, a favorite among locals, which can also be dovetailed with a hike to the Hanging Gardens, located outside the National Recreation Area, so you don’t have to pay an entrance fee
      Wahweap Swim Beach, inside the National Recreation Area (entrance fee required), between the Lake Powell Resort and Stateline launch ramp, has picnic tables and grills
      Lone Rock Beach, also inside the NRA (entrance fee required), popular spot for camping, but day use is permitted; has restrooms and outdoor showers
      Unfortunately, the Antelope Canyons will be closed at the time of your visit. Another good slot canyon you might go to is Wire Pass, which is between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT. Access to the trailhead is off US89 on the House Rock Valley Road. It doesn’t require a guided tour, you simply pay a nominal entrance fee at the self-registration kiosk. The catch: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved. Those in rental cars are discouraged from traveling on it as doing so would void your insurance, leaving you on the hook for any damage you might sustain. If recent weather has been wet, it can be rendered impassable, so be sure to check current conditions before attempting it, or call a local guide service who can escort you there in safety. Wire Pass Canyon also connects with the Buckskin Gulch, the longest slot canyon in the area (20+ miles). You might also explore part of it after finishing up in Wire Pass, should you go there.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  39. Do you know if after sunset they tell people to leave? So if sunset is at 7:45, at 9p does everyone have to leave? How strict are they? Thanks!

    1. Hi J,
      They usually let people hang around for awhile after sunset for photos, but will encourage people to wrap things up once it gets dark.
      Alley 🙂

  40. Hi,
    What time does Horseshoe Bend parking lot open and close? I want to go either really early in the morning or later in the evening so it’s not too hot and to see if we can catch some beautiful colors in the sky! I’m planning to get there tomorrow morning.

    Thanks!

    Maria

    1. Hi Maria,
      Apologies for not attending to your inquiry sooner. Hopefully you found that the Horseshoe Bend Overlook is open from sunrise to sunset and that you were able to get some great photos!
      Take care and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  41. Hi Alley,

    My friends and I will be visiting the Page area this upcoming weekend. We have boat reservations for Saturday, and were wondering what boating access was available into the water-filled parts of Antelope Canyon, as well as the access to Rainbow Bridge via boat were given the Navajo closures. In addition, it seems like there isn’t any issue with access to Horseshoe Bend, Lee’s Ferry, and the North Rim of the GC. Is that accurate?

    Thanks,
    Zach

    1. Hi Zach,
      You’ve timed your visit to Page, AZ, fairly well, with a few exceptions. The land-side segments of the Antelope Canyons remain closed, but you can still visit via the waterside. Antelope Point Marina, however, remains closed. As for Rainbow Bridge, the official website doesn’t indicate that it’s closed, per se. Since boat tours have yet to resume, however, the boat dock may be closed (although I can find no documentation on this), and unfortunately, the current level of Lake Powell doesn’t allow you to see the bridge from your boat, even if you can park it at the dock. It takes a 2+ mile round-trip walk (some of that uphill) from the dock to actually see the Bridge.
      All that said, I honestly don’t recommend that you attempt to go all the way to Rainbow Bridge and back if you only have a one-day boat rental. Since Rainbow Bridge is 50+ miles one way uplake from Wahweap, where I assume you’re getting your boat, it will essentially take you all day to do this. Plus, you’ll have to make a fuel stop at Dangling Rope since smaller boats can’t carry enough gas to get you there and back on a single tank. And there’s the potential of getting lost, and having to make part of the return trip in the dark, which is disconcerting to say the least if you’re not an experienced boater. Therefore, a better plan would be to explore Lake Powell in a smaller radius from the marina. Don’t worry, you’ll find plenty of beautiful scenery to discover and enjoy! Just ask the staff at the boat rental desk for recommendations.
      You are correct in that there is no issue with access to Horseshoe Bend or Lees Ferry. The North Rim of the Grand Canyon, however, is not scheduled to reopen until June 5th. You can still visit the South Rim if you want, albeit with a few stipulations. For more information, visit Grand Canyon National Park’s official website.
      For current information on what’s accessible at Lake Powell, visit Glen Canyon National Recreation Area’s official website.
      Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  42. Hi Alley,

    My husband and I were planning a trip to visit Horseshoe Bend on June 8 & 9th. We see that Antelope Canyon is now open (or scheduled to be). Is Horseshoe Bend now open as well??

    1. Hi Olivia,
      The Antelope Canyons are indeed shooting for an opening date of around the time of your visit. Whether that happens or not, we can’t guarantee as the Navajo Reservation has been hit disproportionately hard by COVID-19. You should be prepared to make other plans if they decide to extend the closure period. Wire Pass and/or Buckskin Gulch would make for a good “plan B” in case that happens.
      The good news is that Horseshoe Bend never closed during the shutdown, so it will be open when you arrive! The parking lot is accessible between sunrise and sunset. Since mid-day temperatures are climbing above 100 these days, we recommend hitting it just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  43. Hi,
    We are currently in Utah visiting Bryce National Park. We had planned to hike Kanarra Falls, however, when we got there, passes were sold out. We came from California and this trip was impromptu, should have planned ahead but too late for that now. So, question is, are you also sold out for the Memorial Weekend? Is it possible to walk-in and buy passes there or advisable to purchase tickets/ passes online. If so, kindly send me the link. Thank you.

    1. Hi Ethel,
      Sorry to hear you were unpleasantly surprised by conditions at Kanarra Falls. This beautiful hike becomes more popular with every passing year, so advance preparations must be made by those interested in visiting!
      While Horseshoe Bend is also very populat, advance reservations are neither taken nor required for visiting. Simply show up to the overlook anytime between sunrise and sunset, pay the parking fee ($10/standard passenger vehicle, or $35/light commercial vehicle), then hike out at your leisure. In theory, anyway. In reality, the hours just after sunrise are the best time to visit Horseshoe Bend to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
      Unfortunately, other nearby attractions such as the Antelope Canyons and Monument Valley remain closed.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  44. Hi, my family and I are planning to visit Horseshoe Bend Park tomorrow. We live in Las Vegas and will be driving in the morning. I just want to ask and make sure that the walking trail and the Overlook site are open? Also, do you have any other recommendations to go to that is open to visiting at this time? We will be staying at a hotel in Page City. Thank you.

    1. Hi Ray,
      Hopefully you found that Horseshoe Bend is indeed open and that many great viewpoints along Lake Powell are open as well.
      For those planning on visiting Page, AZ, in the immediate future, Horseshoe Bend is open from sunrise to sunset, and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area/Lake Powell is, for the most part, open, although some activities and facilities are either closed or operating at limited capacity.
      Unfortunately, the Antelope Canyons, Monument Valley, and other attractions situated on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands remain closed.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Stacey!
      The Horseshoe Bend Parking Lot is open from sunrise to sunset.
      As for how long it takes to walk out to the overlook, that varies from person to person. On average, it takes a little under an hour to make the 1.3 mile walk to the rim and back for someone in relatively good health with no major mobility limitations. However, we recommend allowing at least 2 hours to park, fully enjoy Horseshoe Bend, take plenty of photos, and make the walk back to the parking lot at a comfortable pace.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi again, David!
          The town of Page, Arizona has a wide selection of hotels and vacation rentals in price points and amenity classes ranging from Motel 6 to Marriott and everything in between. For more information and to make a booking, visit GrandCanyon.com: East Canyon Hotels
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  45. Hi,
    I and my family, 8 adults and 2 young kids (2 & 3 yrs old) plan to drive a RV from Orange COunty (OC) to visit HorseShoe Bend on 5/28/20. We’ve never been to Antelope Canyon, Lake Powell or Horseshoe Bend.
    Day 1-5/28/20: drive at 1pm from OC to Vegas- rest
    Day2- 5/29/20: in AM drive to Horseshoe bend to visit the overlook- camp at one of RV camp side (do you know any camp site will open and allow us to have RV hookup, RV dump and near by)
    Day 3- 5/30/20 : visit lake Powell, maybe upper Antelope and/or overlook the lower Antelope (need to find the different camp site ? or we can stay at the same one ?)
    Day 4-5/31/20 : do not know what we will do in the morning, afternoon we can start drive to Vegas, rest
    Day 5 – 6/1/20 : in AM start driving back and return RV in the afternoon

    Please help me with your expert opinion that if my plan above will be possible and what we should do for my day 4. what would be the recommendations to cover other natural scenic places near by? Are there aNy available tours we should book ? I am also willing to change my plan above based on your recommendation (like we should visit Lake Powell first then Horseshoe bend…)

    Thank you so much

    1. Hi Nina,
      First off, are you aware that the Antelope Canyons are closed due to COVID-19? Antelope Canyon and the surrounding slot canyons in Page, AZ, are located on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Their residents have been hit particularly hard by COVID-19 and they naturally want to be certain that the danger has for the most part passed before re-opening their tribal parks, which is not expected to occur until later this summer.
      Also, I get the feeling you’re underestimating the drive times between locations on your itinerary. It takes approximately 5 hours to drive from Orange County to Las Vegas, then another 5 hours to drive from Las Vegas to Page, AZ. At the time of year you’re visiting, the Horseshoe Bend parking lot could be quite busy and you may have trouble finding a place to park. For this reason, we recommend visiting Horseshoe Bend in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and thinner crowds.
      Another issue is the ages of your children. Lower Antelope Canyon is quite rugged, with several stairs and ladders that you must navigate to pass through it. Not so fun when you’re carrying one, possibly two kids who can’t manage it themselves. But again, that’s all moot in light of the fact that the Antelope Canyons will most likely remain closed by the time you arrive.
      Still, you should be able to have an enjoyable visit to Page, AZ. As for where you camp, Wahweap Campground inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area has all the amenities you’re looking for in a great location, just minutes from the shores of Lake Powell!
      On what else you might do or where else you might go, you might consider going to Zion National Park upon leaving Page, AZ. It’s a beautiful area, about a 2-hour drive from Page, AZ, and right on your way to Las Vegas. There are some special procedures for RV’s driving through the Mt. Carmel Tunnel which you should be aware of. For RV camping with hook-ups, look to the town of Springdale, UT, on the Western border of the park.
      Whatever you decide, please be sure to make advance reservations for RV campgrounds at all points on your itinerary.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. Nina,

      Day 4 head north out of Page on US89 and take it thru southwest UT. Beautiful drive. You will drive thru Zion NP on the way to I-15 to head back towards Vegas. Several spots in eastern part of Zion to pull off and climb up sone of the rock formations. Many like a steep no marked trail on flat/smooth rock and can get a 100 feet + above the roadway. Anyway – just an option.

      2021 – Plan your Zion, Bryce Canyon, Capital Reef and Canyonlands NP trip now. 😉

    1. Dear Russ,
      If your visit to Horseshoe Bend is scheduled to take place in the next few days or weeks, the parking fee has been temporarily waived.
      If you plan on visiting sometime in the more distant future, both cash and credit cards are accepted at the entrance station.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Dear Flavia,
          As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. Collection of the usual $10/vehicle parking fee has also been temporarily suspended. The overlook is open from sunrise to sunset. People are coming to visit, but in fewer numbers than they had in the past.
          Assuming that you are planning to visit in the near future, there are a few things you should keep in mind: the Antelope Canyons, another popular attraction in Page, AZ, are closed until further notice. There are also over 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona. In addition, many other popular attractions in the area such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and personal hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley

      1. I just read on NPS.gov that horseshoe bend is now closed. Comments below indicate it is open. Can you please clarify?

        1. Hi Jacki,
          Not sure which site you read that on, because I have just checked NPS.gov for Glen Canyon, the NPS unit that Horseshoe Bend technically falls within, and it states:
          “The trail to Horseshoe Bend Overlook remains open. The park urges visitors to follow CDC guidance to prevent the spread of infectious diseases by practicing social distancing and avoiding congregations of 10 or more people.”
          Hope that helps.
          Alley

          1. Thanks, Alley. My stupid error — apparently I was looking at Horseshoe Bend Military Park in Alabama. (face palm)
            Question about Horseshoe Bend — are leased dogs allowed on the trail and overlook point? I’ve read yes but want to confirm before driving 4 hours! Thanks.

          2. Hi Jacki,
            Yes, the fact that there are several “Horseshoe Bends” throughout the U.S. does make it confusing!
            Dogs are welcome at the Horseshoe Bend Overlook in Arizona as long as they are leashed and their owners pick up after them. Also, be sure to bring enough water for yourself and your pet. If your visit is planned for the summer, you might also invest in a set of protective booties as the sand and rocks get very hot.
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

    1. Dear Jonathan,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. However, the Antelope Canyons are closed until further notice. In light of that fact, plus considering that there are over 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

  46. Hi there, thinking about coming to horseshoe bend and antelope canyon next weekend. Wondering if both sights are open?

    1. Dear Morgan,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. However, the Antelope Canyons are closed until further notice. In light of that fact, and considering that there are over 500 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

      1. Hello I was thinking of taking the 4.5 hour drive. I just called and the voice mail says horseshoe is closed because of covid. Although these messages say open.

        1. Dear Jennifer,
          EDIT 04/24 11:11 AM — The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is open!
          ————————————————————————
          I wish I knew what number you had called, because it certainly wasn’t connected to this page.
          According to the official website of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, the trail to the overlook remains open. If you can forward me the number you called, I can try to verify whether or not it’s valid.
          Alley

        1. Dear Joanna,
          The Antelope Canyons unfortunately remain closed until further notice, but Horseshoe Bend remains open. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area/Lake Powell will also begin a phased reopening of facilities such as lodging, restaurants, and activities as outlined on the official National Park Service website.
          Nevertheless, there are a few things you should keep in mind before committing to your trip: there are over 3,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and the Navajo Reservation has been hit particularly hard. They are asking that travelers avoid that area altogether if possible. In addition, many other popular attractions in the area such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley may be partially or completely closed. With all that in mind, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and personal hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    2. Is there any spots for dispersed camping for one night there? Or on BLM land/state land that allows camping off the grid? Facilities are not needed.

      1. Hi Uft,
        This is an excellent question! Unfortunately, the answer, pertaining to Horseshoe Bend anyway, is “no.” The good news is there is thousands of acres of BLM land in the immediate vicinity of Page, AZ, particularly in the Vermillion Cliffs/Paria Canyon Wilderness Area where you might find a nice spot to pitch a tent for the night. Some sites, such as the Coyote Buttes area (home of The Wave) forbid overnight camping, and require a permit to enter, but you can still find some reasonably priced “dry” or developed camping in and around Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon, and Lake Powell.
        For more information, check out “Camping & RV Options Near Antelope Canyon” on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
        One more thing: I’m assuming that you’re considering a trip for the future, namely a post-COVID 19 future? If your visit is immediately upcoming, please practice social distancing and cleanliness protocols as advised by the WHO and CDC, and endorsed by the BLM.
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

    1. Good morning, Julissa:
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants.
      In light of the fact that there are over 400 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including some fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

      1. Hi Natalie,
        As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants.
        In light of the fact that there are over 500 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, Monument Valley, and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
        If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
        – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
        – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
        – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
        – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
        – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
        – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
        – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
        – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley

    1. Hi Kendal,
      As of Monday, March 30th, Horseshoe Bend remains open for visitation. However, in light of the fact that there are several confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Page, AZ, in a town with limited medical resources that are already stretched thin, we strongly recommend considering whether your visit is 100% necessary. If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of
      infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hello Shannon,
          As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open. However, in light of the fact that there are several confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including 2 fatalities) in Page, AZ, and many more in the Navajo Indian Reservation, which abuts the town of Page, AZ, we strongly recommend considering whether your visit is 100% necessary. Bear in mind that both areas have very limited medical capabilities that have already been stretched beyond their respective capacities.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of
          infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

        1. Dear Alice,
          As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants.
          In light of the fact that there are over 400 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including some fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley

    1. Hi Brenda,
      Apologies for not replying to your inquiry sooner. Hopefully you discovered that Horseshoe Bend Overlook was indeed open and you were able to visit without a problem. We also hope that you followed social distancing and hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of
      infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Kanako,
      Yes, Horseshoe Bend is open as of today. For obvious reasons, we urge you to please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face, especially after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that get touched frequently, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Aaliah,
          At the present time, Horseshoe Bend is open. That could change with very little notice under the circumstances.
          For obvious reasons, we urge you to please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face, especially after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that get touched frequently, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
          You should also know that at the moment, there are 6 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Page, Arizona. For your family’s health and safety, and that of the local community (which has only limited health care services), you should consider staying home. Horseshoe Bend will be there when this is all over!
          Take care and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  47. Hello!

    I heard some touristic spots are closed due to COVID-19. Is Horseshoe bend open? What is the difficulty level of the trail? I mean, a 7-years old child can do it?

    Thanks!

    1. Hi Humberto,
      At this time, Horseshoe Bend remains open to the public, although that is subject to change without notice. We simply ask that you practice basic common-sense measures: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that are frequently handled, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
      As to whether a 7-year-old can handle the trail, kids that age do it every day. As to whether your kid can, only you can be the judge of that. It’s ~a 1.2 mile round-trip walk, and the trail has has recently been graded to make it more even and easier to manage, but there are still a few “hilly” parts. To get a sense of what it’s like, watch this video.
      Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

      1. 1. Where is the best place (website, phone number, which social media, etc.) to check if Horseshoe Bend will be closed due to COVID-19?
        2. Are dogs allowed in Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon?
        3. If starting from Las Vegas, best time of day to arrive?
        4. Do you recommend checking out Antelope Canyon first, spend the night at Page, then venturing out to Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning?

        Thanks for all you do!
        Cristina

        1. Hi Cristina,
          At this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open. or your health and safety, and that of your families, please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face, especially after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that get touched frequently, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
          For current information regarding potential closure(s), I would recommend monitoring these websites:
          The National Park Service at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
          LakePowellLife.com, website of the local radio station in Page, AZ, and
          The Lake Powell Chronicle, Page, AZ’s local newspaper
          Dogs are welcome at Horseshoe Bend, but they must be on a leash and you must pick up after them. Be sure to bring enough water for yourself, the rest of your traveling party, and your pet. If you are planning to visit during the summer months, you may wish to bring a set of booties for your dog. That sand can get really hot in the mid-day sun. Dogs are prohibited in Antelope Canyon due to the rugged nature of the terrain.
          It takes approximately 5 hours to drive over from Las Vegas, possibly longer due to some construction going on in the area. The best time of day to arrive is whenever you can find a parking space, but just after sunrise tends to be best for cooler temperatures and fewer people to contend with.
          If you can possibly spend the night in Page, AZ, that would make for a better experience for you than a day trip. That way you can tour Antelope Canyon on the morning of your arrival (provided the Antelope Canyons are still open by the time you visit! All Antelope Canyon tours are cancelled until further notice due to COVID-19), then hit Horseshoe Bend in the morning.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

          1. Thank you for your updates. Sorry to ask, but are you guys still open today? – FER 🙂

          2. Hi Jennifer!
            As of now, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status may be subject to change on very short notice. For now, we urge you to please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face, especially after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that get touched frequently, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
            For current information regarding potential closure(s), I would recommend monitoring these websites:
            LakePowellLife.com, website of the local radio station in Page, AZ, and
            The Lake Powell Chronicle, Page, AZ’s local newspaper
            The City of Page, who oversee the parking lot at Horseshoe Bend
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

  48. It is unfortunate the City of Page has put up a road block to the National Park and does not accept the National Parks Pass. What is next? A City if Page fee station before entering Lake Powell from other points?

    1. Dear Jon,
      We are very sorry that you are unpleasantly surprised by the new parking situation at Horseshoe Bend. You are by no means alone in expressing dismay that the America the Beautiful Pass is not valid here. Since our site is privately owned, we don’t have any pull with the City of Page in this regard, but we would certainly encourage you to make your feelings known by phoning the Economic Development/Tourism Board at 928-645-4310. As for there being another fee station elsewhere on Lake Powell, that’s highly unlikely.
      Best regards,
      Alley

  49. Hi there,
    We are planning a trip to Horseshoe Bend on 30th of march but we are not sure the parking lost is closed or not.
    Could you please let us know if the parking lot is available on that day?

    1. Hi Jerry,
      The parking lot is open 7 days a week, 365 days a year!
      The only conditions that would result in its closure are extreme weather events or overcrowding, both instances which are extremely rare.
      Hope that helps.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Jennifer,
      They take cash and credit/debit cards. It helps to have cash on hand in the event their credit card processing machines go down.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  50. Does coming during the week affect crowd since at all, we plan to be there Monday May the 4th and wandering about how crowds may look?

    1. Dear Maddie,
      Weekday visitors may be slightly lower in number than weekend crowds, but Horseshoe Bend is still busy on a daily basis, especially at the time of year you’re visiting. Just after sunrise remains the least crowded time for visiting Horseshoe Bend.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi, I read some comments about how there’s a nearby (a mile or 2) overflow parking lot when the main parking lot is full, and they shuttle people back and forth to the main parking lot. Is this true and how much is it? Does it run smoothly or is it just a big pain in the neck? We are supposed to be coming April 29th.

        1. Hi Cyndi,
          Since that situation last occurred (which was over a major holiday weekend), the main parking lot of Horseshoe Bend was expanded to accommodate more vehicles. If that parking lot fills, you’ll simply be asked to return to Horseshoe Bend at a later time. In the unlikely event that system is implemented at the time you visit, the best way to avoid the hassles is to visit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise. That way, you can take advantage of cooler temperatures and fewer people coompeting for parking.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  51. Hi, we are planning a trip there in March during our spring break, coming from Oregon. What time is typically sunrise there? So my understanding, we pay then park and hike? How long is the trail?
    Thank you

    1. Hi Rachel,
      During the month of March, days are lengthening quite rapidly. In the beginning of the month, sunrise occurs shortly before 7:00 AM, but towards the end of the month, it will rise at around 6:10 AM. For the exact sunrise time on your trip date, consult http://www.Sunrise-Sunset.org and do a search for Page, AZ.
      Your understanding is correct in that you pay your parking fee, then hike to the overlook. The trail is .6-7 miles long, one way.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  52. Hi there!

    I’m driving up from Phoenix and will arrive to the vicinity in the predawn hours. Is there a parking lot or location nearby where I can safely park while Horseshoe Bend parking lot opens?

    1. Hi Julian,
      We really don’t advise driving in the dark in this part of the U.S. Once you get past Flagstaff, AZ, you’ll find the road to be very dimly lit (a deliberate move to preserve the natural darkness of the night sky), plus deer, elk, and other wildlife tend to be nocturnal and like to graze on the highway shoulder. Should you have a collision with an animal, help will be a long time in coming (if you can get a cell phone signal), and very expensive to boot. A safer plan would be to drive to Page, AZ, the day prior and spend the night.
      If you proceed with your present plans, the local Super-Walmart is just a short distance North of Horseshoe Bend on US89 and has a good-sized parking lot you can wait in. Or if you haven’t had breakfast yet, we have a Denny’s just a short distance away, open 24/7.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  53. Good afternoon,
    We are planning to be in the area June 16th and 17th. What hour of the day would you recommend has the best availability in the parking lot?

    Best,
    Tom

    1. Hey Tom!
      During the summer months, we recommend trying to visit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise for two key reasons:
      1. cooler temperatures – June is one of the hotter months of the year, and there is virtually no shade available on the walk to Horseshoe Bend and at the overlook itself. In the early morning hours, you can at enjoy temperatures in the mid 60’s to low ’70’s (Fahrenheit) instead of sweltering in the 90’s or 100’s!
      2. thinner crowds – between the hours of 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM, day trippers from Las Vegas, Phoenix, Sedona, Flagstaff, and elsewhere are converging on the overlook. A visit at sunrise or shortly thereafter will spare you from dealing with all that chaos!
      In mid-June, sunrise occurs at 5:00 AM.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  54. I’m going to be visiting at the end of April and would love to be there at sunrise and/or sunset. What is the parking situation – if I get there at 5:30 AM, will I be able to get in even though that’s before sunset? And if I go for sunset and stay for a while to stargaze, will be car be locked in? Thanks for any help 🙂

    1. Dear Susan,
      At present, “dawn to dusk” are the official operating hours of the Horseshoe Bend parking lot, according to the City of Page. This means you wouldn’t be able to access the overlook prior to sunrise, or be permitted to stay past sunset. Since you are not alone in wanting to visit Horseshoe Bend before “actual” sunrise and after “actual” sunset, I would recommend contacting the City office Economic Development and Tourism to voice your concerns. They can be reached at (928) 645-4310.
      Sorry I couldn’t be more helpful at this time,
      Alley

      1. Another question if you don’t mind. Would I at least be able to get in and park before sunrise? I don’t mind getting there and sitting for a few minutes, waiting for them to open, I just don’t know the layout of the parking and if the gate is before you get in to park or after.

        1. Hey again, Susan!
          Unfortunately, there is no way at the present time to access Horseshoe Bend Overlook prior to sunrise. The entrance to the parking lot is off US89 Southbound, about 5 miles South of Page, AZ. You have to go through one of several directed traffic lanes before you get to the actual kiosk where you pay the parking fee, then enter the parking lot.
          Since you are not alone in wanting to get to Horseshoe Bend before sunrise, I would encourage you to call the City of Page’s Economic Development & Tourism Office to voice your concerns. Maybe if enough people call, they’ll get the hint that there is a demand for pre-sunrise entry. They can be reached at (928) 645-4310.
          Sorry I couldn’t be more helpful in that regard,
          Alley

  55. If we arrive around 2pm in mid march weekday, would we be at risk for no parking? I’ve heard this lovely place gets quite over crowded and parking fills up. We would hope to have our own car vs a shuttle.

    1. Hi Jess,
      Since mid-March falls within the Spring Break holiday for many U.S. schools, you might find parking at Horseshoe Bend to be a problem during your visit. Should that be the case, you will simply be asked to return to Horseshoe Bend later. If you are staying overnight in Page, AZ, I would strongly recommend revising your plans to visit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise the following morning. At present, the early morning hours are the least crowded. In mid-March, sunrise occurs at about 6:30 AM.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Collette,
      Barring an extreme weather event, such as heavy snow or a flash flood (which are highly unlikely), yes it will!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  56. Hi !
    I’m planning to visit horsehoe bend in march for the sunrise. From what I understand, the parking lot opens at sunrise. Considering the walk to reach the viewpoint, I won’t be able to be there for the sunrise, but juste after, am I correct ? If so, is there a way to be at the viewpoint for sunrise ? Thank you !

    1. Dear Carl,
      At present, “dawn to dusk” are the official operating hours of the Horseshoe Bend parking lot, according to the City of Page. This means you wouldn’t be able to be at the overlook prior to sunrise. Since you are not alone in wanting to visit Horseshoe Bend before “actual” sunrise, I would recommend contacting the City office Economic Development and Tourism to voice your concerns. They can be reached at (928) 645-4310.
      Sorry I couldn’t be more helpful at this time,
      Alley

  57. Hi, i heard there is a photo tour group that can get me there before sunrise to get setup etc, do you know of one that does that?

    Thanks

    1. Hi Tom,
      The only one I’m aware of that might be willing to do that sort of thing would be Horseshoe Bend Tours. They go to the overlook via a private entrance on Navajo Indian Tribal Land. You might want to contact them by phone at (435) 275-4594.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  58. Hello
    We are planning a sunrise visit on july 14th this year. At what time do we have to be at the parking to be in time at the overlook? Thanks for your answer!
    Greetings from Belgium

  59. Hi,
    we are coming in early April. what’s the time for sunset and sunrise? if you can choose one, would you do sunset or sunrise? 🙂 Coming with 2 kids (9 and 11). Thank you!!

    1. Hi Sylvia,
      This is a very good question! April falls within peak tourist season in Page, AZ, including Horseshoe Bend. Sunset is a very popular time to be at the overlook, and we’ve seen the crowds to prove it. As a result, you may have trouble finding parking, which would make for a disappointing end to one’s day.
      A better plan, if you can get the kids up for it, is to hit Horseshoe Bend Overlook just after sunrise, which takes place just before 6:00 AM in April (sunset occurs at around 7:00 PM). A sunrise visit to Horseshoe Bend will make for an easier time finding parking, cooler temperatures, and fewer people to contend with. Plus that will leave you with plenty of time in the day for more activities, such as the Glen Canyon Float Trip, Antelope Canyon tours, visiting the Glen Canyon Dam, and much more!
      Hope that helps – good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  60. Hello. I am driving a 4 runner with a trailer attached. I am not that skilled of a driver and can not back up. Is there parking available that is pull through?

    1. Hi Bea,
      I’ll put it this way: to enjoy the best chance of getting a pull-through site, or a reasonable facsimile thereof, you should plan on arriving at the Horseshoe Bend Overlook first thing in the morning. The parking lot opens at dawn. Between 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM, the parking lot is extremely busy, and I can pretty much guarantee that you’ll have problems finding a pull-through spot.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  61. Are you open during the winter? We’re planning on making a stop Monday 12/23 in the morning and wondered if you were still open to the public?

    1. Hi Alex,
      Yes, Horseshoe Bend will be open, as it is 365 days a year, barring extreme weather events.
      The entrance gate staff are on-site between sunrise and sunset.
      Have a wonderful time, good luck, safe travels and Happy Holidays!
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hello Severine,
      The Horseshoe Bend Overlook parking lot is open 365 days a year, weather permitting, between sunrise and sunset!
      Good luck, safe travels, and Merry Christmas to you, too,
      Alley 🙂

  62. I will be coming the Middle of May from Illinois. I am planning on spending a full day doing the Antelope Canyon Tours and the next day I am wanting to spend visiting Horseshoe bend and the Vermilion Cliffs. I’m not wanting to do any tours this day, I am wanting to just go by myself and sightsee. Is this possible with parking and walking to where I need to go? It will be my first time in Arizona.

    Thank you.

    1. Hi Shea,
      Yes, it is possible to visit Horseshoe Bend and the Vermillion Cliffs area without going on a guided tour.
      For Horseshoe Bend, you simply drive to the parking area (which you can’t miss) about 5 miles South of town, pay the one-time $10/vehicle parking fee, and walk to the overlook. Give this ~60-90 minutes to walk out, take pictures, and walk back.
      To get to the Vermillion Cliffs area from there, continue driving South on US89, then when you arrive at Bitter Springs, AZ, turn right onto US89A. This road will take you to the Marble Canyon/Lees Ferry/Cliff Dwellers area, which sit on the border of the Vermillion Cliffs. If possible, take time to walk around the Lonely Dell Ranch Historic Site near Lees Ferry, and save your appetite so you can enjoy lunc at the Cliff Dweller’s Lodge Restaurant! Time/inclination permitting, you might even swing all the way out to the Jacob Lake Inn to get some of their delicious home-made cookies for dessert!

      Whatever you decide to do, just be sure to do any and all driving during daylight hours. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to the fact that roads are very dimly lit (a deliberate move to preserve the natural darkness of the night sky), and deer, elk, and other wildlife tend to move about after sunset. You don’t want to risk a collision with a large animal in an unfamiliar area that is pitch black, where cell phone service is spotty to nonexistent, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention very expensive. In mid-May, sunrise occurs at about 5:30 AM, sunset takes place at around 7:20 PM.
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
      Alley 🙂

  63. Hi,
    is the 10$ parking fee valid for one day?
    Let’s say I come for sunrise and pay 10$, leave and come back for sunset. Will I have to pay 10$ again?
    Thanks for any info,
    Sandra

    1. Hi Sandra,
      The Horseshoe Bend parking fee is a one-time fee, so if you were to visit at sunrise, then return to photograph sunset, you would unfortunately have to pay another $10 to park.
      Sorry to be the bearer of bad news on that front.
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
      Alley 🙂

  64. Hi. Can i purchase a parking ticket ahead of time, online? Im planning to visist horseshoe bend this Saturday November 9th.

    1. Hi Edna,
      This is a really good question that unfortunately does not have so good an answer: no. Parkig permits must be purchased on-site at Horseshoe Bend. The parking lot is open between the hours of sunrise and sunset.
      Take care, safe travels, and Happy Holidays,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Is there any update on the completion of the ADA trail? Planning to be there mid-December with someone with mobility challenges.

        1. Hi Chris,
          Unfortunately, the project has fallen a bit behind schedule and they are still working on it! If your party member is unable to make the walk, consider going to the overlook with Horseshoe Bend Tours. They offer a shuttle to Horseshoe Bend via a private alternate entrance on Native American land where the walk to the rim is only 200 yards.
          Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
          Alley 🙂

    1. Leo,
      If you are referring to rafting, kayaking, or stand-up paddleboarding (SUPing) on the Colorado River through Horseshoe Bend, there are several ways to go about this. If you have your own kayak, you can engage a backhaul service to take your watercraft to the base of Glen Canyon Dam, where you can then paddle the 15-mile stretch of the river to Lees Ferry. Companies that offer this service are Wilderness River Adventures out of Page, AZ, and Kayak Horseshoe Bend out of Marble Canyon/Lees Ferry, AZ. Kayak Horseshoe Bend also rents both inflatable and hardbody kayaks for those who need them. These companies should provide maps if/when you engage their services.
      Should you prefer a guided tour, the Glen Canyon Half Day Float Trip out of Page, AZ, travels from the base of Glen Canyon Dam to Lees Ferry from Page, AZ. This tour is also offered by Wilderness River Adventures.
      Hope that helps.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Krishna!
      The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is open from sunrise to sunset 365 days a year. Around the Christmas holiday, sunrise occurs at approximately 7:30 AM and sunset takes place just before 5:30 PM.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  65. We will be in Page Az. on Ot. 2 &3 and was wondering if you know if they are working on the accessible walkway for Horseshoe Bend.

    1. Hi Gene,
      The ADA accessible trail is being worked on as we speak and is slated for completion in October. However, the exact date the trail will be available to use is unknown. We recommend monitoring local websites such as the Lake Powell Chronicle or Lake Powell Life.
      Sorry we couldn’t be any clearer than that,
      Alley

  66. Hello Alley, we are planning on visiting Horsehoe Bend on sept 12th. Can tickets be purchased in advance or only onsite on the day? Many thanks 🙂

    1. Hi Nacira,
      Horseshoe Bend Overlook parking fees are paid on-site at the time you visit. If you prefer to take a shuttle to Horseshoe Bend from Page, AZ, you can reserve a seat in advance through Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon Tours.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  67. Hi Alley,

    I’m visiting Horseshoe in October 24th. On that date, the sunrise is about 6:56am – Is the place always open? Or what time does it open in October?
    Thank you.

    1. Hi Raquel!
      The Horseshoe Bend parking lot is not open 24/7, but is open between sunrise and sunset. The staff modifies their schedule according to sunrise and sunset times for visitor convenience.
      Hope that helps – good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  68. I would like to know if the Horshoe Bend requieres CUA permit. If it so, can send me information related to the CUA Requirements and Fees for Road-based Commercial Tour Operators. How we can apply? How much does it cost? The prices per person? The rules and prices for buses? etc.

    1. Hi Lizbeth,
      To our knowledge, a CUA permit is not required to visit the Horseshoe Bend Overlook. You simply pay a one-time fee based on the capacity of the vehicle you are driving. These were outlined in the article you commented on, but they are as follows:
      Motorcycle: $5
      Passenger vehicles (car, truck, SUV, RV, motorhome): $10
      Commercial vans with passenger capacity of 14 or less: $35*
      Mid-sized commercial and tour buses with passenger capacity of 15-35: $70*
      Full-size buses with passenger capacity of 35 or more: $140*
      For more information about the guidelines for visiting Horseshoe Bend in commercial vehicles, we recommend contacting the Page, AZ, Police Department. For the time being, they have assumed all responsibility for fee collection and parking enforcement. Their phone # is 928-645-2463.
      Hope that helps,
      Alley 🙂

  69. Hi Alley, I’m visiting horseshoe in August. As I have been reading, work roads are over, aren’t they? I mean that we won’t need to take any bus to get there and we’ll be able to park our car without any problem. Am I right? Thanks a lot!

    1. Hi Cristina,
      You are correct in that the construction on the parking lot is complete. However, that hasn’t done much to reduce the crowds that can and do overwhelm Horseshoe Bend. If traffic levels necessitate it, the bus system that was used during the construction phase is standing by, ready to be brought back online to alleviate the congestion. If you’d prefer not to deal with this (which we don’t blame you for!), a few options are:
      1. Visiting Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise (between 5:30 AM – 5:45 AM) to take advantage of cooler temperatures and fewer people.
      2. Flying over it in an airplane or helicopter.
      3. Taking a horseback ride.
      4. Taking a shuttle to a private area of the overlook on Navajo Indian Land.
      For further details on these alternate methods for visiting Horseshoe Bend, check out “Help — There’s No Place To Park At Horseshoe Bend!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Jim,
      At the present time, the hike from the main parking lot to the Horseshoe Bend Overlook is .6 miles one way. The paved walkway is still under construction and is slated for completion in October-November of this year.
      If you feel you might have difficulty making the walk, read the tips in this article for alternate ways to get to Horseshoe Bend that involve less exertion: “Help! I Can’t Make The Hike To Horseshoe Bend
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  70. Today we visited Horseshoebend. We travelled a lot in whole of the USA with our 12-passenger bus with our family and we’ve never been so dissapointed about the price of parking. 35$ for 1 or 2 hours.

    1. Dear Renate,
      For one, I am sorry for the delay in response to your comment, but mostly, I’m sorry that you were unpleasantly surprised by the parking fees at Horseshoe Bend. According to the posted guidelines, a commercial van is described as any vehicle having 7-14 seats. The vehicle you’re driving sounds like something akin to a Class B motorhome, and should be categorized as such when you visit Horseshoe Bend.
      Not trying to “pass the buck” here, but this site is privately owned and not affiliated with the National Park Service, the City of Page, or any entities or agencies charged with fee collection at Horseshoe Bend. If you have/had any problems with the on-site staff or believe they are being inconsistent with the enforcement of entrance fees, we encourage you to contact the Page Police Department at 928-645-2463. You might also relay any problems to the City of Page Economic Development/Tourism Board at (928) 645-4310.
      We hope this experience didn’t sour you on the area completely and that you get a chance to return.
      Best regards,
      Alley

  71. Hi Alley,

    We will be making our first trip to Page and Horseshoe Bend. Three of us traveling in one car, spending two nights in Page. Only two in our party want to do the Horseshoe Bend Overlook hike. My Question: If I were to drop the hikers off for a sunrise hike, and go do something else with my morning, would I be able to pick them up after a couple of hours? I see that I am not allowed to park along 89. What about stopping along 89 long enough to pick my family up after the hike? Is this illegal or too dangerous? I am guessing the parking lot would be full by 10 AM and the attendant would not allow me to enter, even if I were to pay the $10 just to pick them up?

    1. Dear Vero,
      You are correct in that dropping passengers off to hike to Horseshoe Bend, then coming back later to pick them up, can be dicey at best, dangerous at worst. During peak travel season, the parking lot typically fills by 10:00 AM. My suggestion would be for your party to drop you off in downtown Page, AZ, which is small enough to be walkable, then they could drive the vehicle to Horseshoe Bend and return to town upon completing the walk.
      Hope that helps.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  72. Hi Alley,

    Just wanted to let you know that we visited Horseshoe Bend today (Saturday June 22nd) and we had no issue finding parking. We arrived at 10 am and there must have been at least a couple dozen spaces for cars and plenty as well for RVs and tour buses. When we left around 11:30 am there were probably just as many open spots if not more. We really lucked out with the weather this weekend too, the high was only about 81 F. Thanks for all of the info – you’re providing a wonderful service!

    1. Hi again, Marc,
      Wow, thank you for taking the time to provide us with a “boots on the ground” update! I’m happy to hear that you didn’t have trouble finding parking, believe me, you were very fortunate in that regard, as well as encountering relatively mild weather for the time of year you’re visiting.
      Hope you get a chance to come back again, and if/when you do, feel free to hit us up for further guidance!
      Have a wonderful summer,
      Alley 🙂

  73. Hi Alley, I’m a Wall Street Journal reporter in Page writing a story about Horseshoe Bend. Could I call you to ask a few questions? My story is on the impact of social media in attracting biug crowds to previously little known destinations like this. Thx, Jim

    If anyone else has an issue with the new parking situation feel free to email me at [email protected]

    1. Hi Jim,
      Thanks for thinking of us. We prefer to keep communications online, but feel free to e-mail us at [email protected] If for some reason I cannot (or should not) answer your question, I will happily refer you to the appropriate authority.
      Good luck with your article,
      Alley 🙂

  74. Alley, Have they completed the wheelchair accessible trail? I am coming to Arizona with my grandson in July and he is wheelchair bound. I would love to take him to Horseshoe Bend if it is an option.

    1. Hi Debra,
      The ADA-compliant trail is not quite complete as of right now. If it is still not accessible at the time of your visit, I’d recommend going to Horseshoe Bend with Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon Tours. They access the overlook via private property on the Navajo Reservation, and the walk to the overlook from there is just 200 yards.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon tours advised me, as of this date, they do not and cannot accommodate wheelchairs. Their transport is an open air truck with 4 across bench seating and handrails. Appears there is no way for them to transport even a folding wheelchair. The other problem is the trail and Slot canyon itself is sandy so they do not recommend thin wheeled/tired wheelchairs as they bog down in sandy terrain. The private road/trail they use from highway to their private Horseshoe Bend overlook area is also naturally sandy.

  75. Hi Alley!
    My wife passed away about 18 months ago, and she always said that she wanted her ashes to be scattered somewhere along Lake Powell, as we often vacationed there years ago. Although we never visited Horseshoe Bend, I think it may be perfect as her “final resting place” Is the scattering of cremated ashes allowed there, and what would you suggest?

    1. Dear Tom,
      I am so sorry about the loss of your wife. The Lake Powell area does indeed sound like a fitting place for her ashes to be scattered. To my knowledge, it is allowed in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (which encompasses Horseshoe Bend), but I’d recommend getting clearance from the National Park Service before proceeding. They can be contacted at (928) 608-6200.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

  76. Welcome to Page…unless you’re a disabled veteran. No military discount? No Disabled Veterans National Park Pass? Not even a “thanks for your service” while paying the fee. Unwelcome. Page needs to take a page from the rest of America and treat disabled veterans with honor. I’m certain the BLM didn’t intend for Page to charge disabled vets for access to national park lands.

    1. Dear George,
      We are sorry to hear that you had less than a warm greeting upon your arrival at Horseshoe Bend. Just to clarify, Horseshoe Bend is not a BLM managed site. It is technically within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, but collection of the parking fees is managed by the City Of Page. We would encourage you to relay what took place to the Economic Development/Tourism Board. They can be contacted at (928) 645-4310. The Page Police Department may also be worthwhile to talk to as the staff at the entrance gates fall under their oversight. Their phone number is 928-645-2463.
      Thank you for your service and God bless,
      Alley

      1. I was very disappointed to find that the city of Page is so greedy that they feel it necessary to charge veterans and senior citizens with National Park Senior Passes $10 to park to get a photo of Horseshoe Bend. I’d advise everyone to print a photo of Horseshoe Bend from Google and skip the parking fee rip off.

        1. Hi Ronnie,
          We are extremely sorry that you were unpleasantly surprised by the parking situation at Horseshoe Bend. You are by no means alone in expressing dismay that veterans, seniors, and those with the America the Beautiful Pass are still being made to pay the $10 fee. Since our site is privately owned, we don’t have any pull with the City of Page in this regard, but we would certainly encourage you to make your feelings known by phoning the Economic Development/Tourism Board at 928-645-4310.
          Best regards,
          Alley

  77. Hi Alley!

    We’re going to visiting on Saturday the 22nd of June. Have the parking lots been filling up on Saturdays and if so, what do estimate the average wait time to be for a spot to open up?

    1. Hi Marc,
      Yes, the parking lot has been filling up, 7 days a week, typically between the hours of 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM. As for how long it takes for a spot to open up, that’s anybody’s guess! In late June, it will also be very hot, so if you can, plan your visit for just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and fewer people.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  78. Hello Alley,
    I have visited Horseshoe Bend in the past and loved it so much. I have a dog now and would love to bring to dog with me for another visit. Is pet allowed to be on the trail to the bend? Thanks!

    1. Hi Jingwen,
      Dogs are welcome at Horseshoe Bend as long as they are leashed. In the summer months, however, you might want to bring some sort of protective covering for your dog’s feet as the sand in that area can get very hot. Also, be sure to bring enough water for yourself and your dog.
      Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Doug,
      The entrance fee depends on your vehicle’s passenger capacity. Vehicles with a capacity of 6 or less are charged $10 to park at Horseshoe Bend, those with capacity of 6-14 fall into the $35 range. The capacity of Ford Transits and similar vans often fall in the middle, causing staff at the entrance fee booth thinking they’re commercial vehicles and/or mini-buses and wanting to charge $35. Sorry to be the bearer of potentially bad news.
      Alley

  79. We stopped by today to try to see Horseshoe Bend at the new accommodations and because we have a Chevrolet Express van she wanted to charge us $35 for the commercial van price. We have six passengers in our car, 4 adults and 2 babies under the age of 2. This is a private vehicle not a commercial vehicle and she would not budge on the price so we left without seeing it!!! This is the biggest rip off ever when motorhomes and RVs are $10 but my van is $35!! You need to train your employees better to distinguish between a commercial van and a private van !!!

    1. Hi, Karen.
      I’m sorry you had to skip Horseshoe Bend due to a misunderstanding about the entrance fees.
      I hate to sound as though I’m passing the buck, but our site is privately owned and not affiliated with the entities responsible for fee collection at Horseshoe Bend. The Page, AZ, Police Department is overseeing that task, therefore I would recommend contacting them to relay what took place yesterday. Their phone # is 928-645-2463. You might also contact the local Office of Economic Development Tourism liaison at 928-645-4310.
      Sorry again and hope you get a chance to come back to the area.
      Alley

    2. Ms. Hunt,
      According to the Chevrolet Express website: https://www.chevrolet.com/commercial/express-passenger-van , your Chevrolet Express van IS designed as and sold as a COMMERCIAL vehicle as prominently posted on its webpage. The standard configuration of the passenger van is seating for 12 and optional for 15. It is marketed to businesses as a commercial passenger van, and the vehicle platform is the basis for a similar business cargo van. If a business purchases a vehicle like this (with specific weight thresholds), the purchase price may be 100% deductible if used for business use. This has fueled sales of this and some large SUV/trucks by business owners (and their families) to take advantage of the tax writeoff.

      As I read the above article by Alley, and the regulations in place by the Page government resolution, the vehicles are classified by the KIND of vehicle they are, and yours IS a commercial vehicle. Whether its USE is private or commercial does not matter, and the number of passengers its carrying at the time does not matter.

      In California where I live, the California DMV lists for commercial drivers licenses:
      “Who Needs a CDL
      You Must Have a CDL to Operate:
      Any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 26,001 pounds or more.
      Any single vehicle with a GVWR less than 26,000 pounds which is designed, used, or maintained to transport more than 10 passengers including the driver. ” Chevrolet Express fits in this category.

      Also on the page: “A 15-passenger van is a van manufactured to accommodate 15 passengers, including the driver, or a van “designed” to carry 15 passengers, including the driver, even if seats have been removed to accommodate fewer than 15 passengers (California Vehicle Code (CVC) §§233 and 15278).” The Chevrolet Express IS designed to carry 15 passengers in total.

      Your specific state of residence may have different specifications and requirements for commercial vehicles and/or commercial drivers licenses. However, Chevrolet themselves classify the Express Van as a commercial vehicle.

      IMO, the parking attendant classified your vehicle correctly and offered to charge you the correct $35 commercial rate. That you would not pay the $35 (less than $9 per adult passenger at the time) was on you. BTW, RV’s and motorhomes may, depending on state, length, and weight, require special licensing, including commercial, to operate. https://www.campanda.com/magazine/rv-special-drivers-license-requirements/ However, in general, most RV’s are not operated with or transporting more than 10 passengers at a time as they don’t have specific seating (with seat belts) for that.

      1. Dear Bart,
        Thank you for your detailed and respectful response to this person’s inquiry. As we get used to the “new normal” at Horseshoe Bend, we are finding that vehicles such as Chevy Express and Ford Transit vans are falling into a “gray area” between commercial and private use, which is negatively impacting some visitors’ experiences. We are hoping that the City of Page will be responsive and proactive in regard to these situations in the future.
        Best regards to you,
        Alley

  80. Perhaps someone really needs to properly define vehicles subject to parking fees. For instance, I am part of a group of 6 visitors who have rented a 15 seat van for 3 weeks touring and golfing in this lovely part of the world. I was charged $35 for entry yesterday despite the fact that the vehicle is not a commercial vehicle. Yes it has 15 seats but I’m not sure it would fit into a commercial vehicle category. It’s usage was not used for hire or reward. It is perhaps seating capacity & usage in combination that ought to be the defined elements.. Not overly concerned about the matter($35 to ultimately view such breathtaking scenery is well worth it) but clarity and transparency are invaluable in maximising customer experience. Did not really appreciate being shouted at by one of your servers either and calm rational explanation would have sufficed.

    1. Hi Colin,
      I am so sorry that you were on the receiving end of not only a pricing policy inconsistency, but rude behavior on the part of an entrance station attendant at Horseshoe Bend. Suffice it to say, there are still some kinks that are being worked out among the City of Page, AZ, local law enforcement, and the traveling public.
      I would strongly recommend relaying what took place during your visit to the agencies in charge of, and benefiting from, the collection of entrance fees, which is primarily the City of Page. The contact number for the Department of Economic Development/Tourism is 928-645-4310.
      Sorry again, and I hope this incident didn’t leave you with a negative impression of our town.
      Best regards,
      Alley

      1. Hi Alley, so what size is considered a commercial van? Is it the seats? I have a windowless GMC Savana which is not registered as commercial, nor does it have ANY seats besides driver. It has a bed in the back and I live inside it– would it be classified as an RV? Just want to know what would cost before I go. Thank you!

        1. Hey Joel,
          Thanks for this excellent question. A commercial van is described as any vehicle having 7-14 seats. The vehicle you’re driving sounds like something akin to a Class B motorhome, and should be categorized as such when you visit Horseshoe Bend. Disclaimer time: this site is privately owned and not affiliated with the National Park Service, the City of Page, or any entities or agencies charged with fee collection at Horseshoe Bend. If you have any problems with the on-site staff or believe they are being inconsistent with the enforcement of entrance fees, we encourage you to contact the Page Police Department at 928-645-2463. You might also relay any problems to the City of Page Economic Development/Tourism Board at (928) 645-4310.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  81. Alley, if the parking lot is only open from sunrise to sunset, what do the folks do who want to take photos of the sunset and golden/blue hour and possible some stars prior to leaving? Will their cars be locked in the parking lot or worse yet, ticketed or towed? Do they force everyone to leave prior to sunset so they can close the parking lot?

    1. Hey Mike,
      Great question, and let me preface my answer by saying the situation at Horseshoe Bend is very much a work in progress, and is somewhat “fluid.”
      As of right now, visitors are being allowed to park in the parking lot and remain after sunset without being ticketed or towed. Ditto for sunrise (people getting in before the entrance gate is staffed). I hope that will be the case when you visit, but won’t make you a promise I can’t keep in that regard.
      Please let us know how you get on.
      Alley 🙂

  82. We went there March 2018 (when it was still free) and there is nothing within comfortable walking distance to park at and walk to. I recall Lower Antelope Canyon being the nearest thing to it, with free parking, but that was a good 5+ miles away. I’d rather pay $10/car than to walk 5+ miles to get there.

    1. Nancy,
      The new parking lot has both solved some problems, and given rise to others. It’s only been 2 weeks that it’s been open, so some kinks are still getting worked out. Right now, on-site officials are finding that between the hours of 10:00 AM and 2:00 PM, they’re still having to revert back to using the alternate lot and shuttle system to get people to the overlook. If that arrangement doesn’t appeal, there are other ways of seeing Horseshoe Bend that don’t involve the hassle of finding parking, but might come with more of a “sticker shock.”
      Alley 🙂

  83. Is the parking fee mandatory? We got the national park pass already, do we still need to pay? How I can skip the fee? (i.e. walking from other free parking lot)

    1. Hi Kelly,
      The Horseshoe Bend parking lot fee is mandatory. Unfortunately, the National Park Pass does not exempt you from having to pay it.
      There are ways to get around the hassle of finding a parking space and the crowds on the ground at Horseshoe Bend, including, but not limited to, flying over it in a fixed wing airplane or helicopter, taking a horseback ride, or taking a shuttle from Page, AZ, that goes to the overlook via a private access road on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands. Naturally, as guided tours, none of those options are free.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  84. To be clear, the fees are collected by the City of Page and 100% of the fees belong to the City. The National Park Service and Glen Canyon NRA gets 0% of the fees despite most of the trail, the viewpoint and the formation itself is on Glen Canyon land. So none of the new fees will go to funding the new ADA trail. This is essentially a city of Page park.

    1. Hi Pablo,
      You are right on all counts, but the ADA trail is still on the table to our knowledge.
      Alley 🙂

      1. I am in the area and thinking of visiting. So even though Horseshoe bend is on national park land and I have a national park year pass there is no way to park to get in without paying again or going on a tour I’m not interested in? I have never heard of such a popular national park site having no parking owned by the national parks. Is there plans for the national parks to make their own lot elsewhere someday?

        1. Hey Andy,
          Visitation to Horseshoe Bend got overwhelming rather quickly, thanks to Instagram, and the City of Page was able to step up to the plate to help get the situation somewhat under control. Yes, it is an unusual solution, and less than ideal in some respects, but leaving things as they were simply wasn’t an option. As for whether NPS will take over administration of the parking in the future, that remains to be seen.
          As for a parking area located “elsewhere,” the Southern flank of the overlook is actually on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands, and a local company called Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon Tours operates an exclusive shuttle service to that area, but it is significantly more expensive than the $10/vehicle parking fee.
          Sorry I couldn’t be more helpful. Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Leticia,
          Unfortunately, you are correct. That situation could change in the foreseeable future, since the area technically falls within Federal Land boundaries, but for now, the City of Page had the resources and the personnel to manage the ever-increasing traffic in the area best.
          Fortunately, you can use your annual National Park pass in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which encompasses Lake Powell Resort and Antelope Point Marina!
          Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Ascen,
      As of right now, the parking lot is open, meaning fee collectors are on-site, from sunrise to sunset. If you visit after sunset, you may not have to pay an entrance fee, but more crucially, you might find the parking lot gated and locked. I would recommend contacting the City of Page to run your ideas by them, as they are charged with staffing the fee station for now. The main number for them is (928) 645-8861.
      Sorry to not have clearer information, the inevitable start-up “kinks” are still being worked out!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. I remember reading that part of the improvement plan was to make a hard path with less elevation from the parking lot to the bend, making the trek easier than walking on the soft, deep, steep sand that some people had difficultly with. Has this been completed?

        1. Hi Jerry,
          Unfortunately, the paved trail has yet to be completed. If you think you would have trouble with the 1.2 mile round trip walk, you might consider taking a shuttle with Horseshoe Bend Tours. They go to the overlook via private land holdings on the Navajo Reservation where the walk is only 200 yards and the view is just as good.
          Check them out at http://www.HorseshoeBendTours.com
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

      2. Hi Alley,

        I’m thinking to visit horseshoe bend on october. Can you tell me what is the distance between the parking and the horseshoe. Is it possible to go by foot? Or it’s better to take a shuttle?

        1. Hi Nueza,
          The distance from the parking lot to Horseshoe Bend overlook is ~.7 miles one way. Yes, it is possible, in fact, mandatory to go by foot. The paved ADA-compliant trail is expected to be completed by then, but the project has already been delayed several times, so can’t guarantee whether that will be the case.
          If you or anyone in your party have doubts about your ability to make the walk to Horseshoe Bend from the main parking area, taking the shuttle offered by Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon Tours may indeed be the better way to go. They access the overlook via Navajo Indian Tribal lands that flank it to the South, and the walk to the viewing area is only ~200 yards.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Marissa,
        There is no mailing address, per se, but the physical address is mile marker 545, US highway 89, just South of Page, AZ. The parking area is quite large and very well-marked. You literally can’t miss it!
        Alley 🙂

      2. Hi Alley,

        I read on other site, that the distance between parking lot and horseshoe bend is 10 min walking, around 0,6 mile. So now, i’ve some doubts. How far is, exactly, the distance between parking lot and horseshoe bend?

        King regards,

        Neuza Sá

        1. Hi Nueza,
          The distance from the parking lot to the overlook is .6 miles via the “social” trail that was established informally before the construction of the paved trail, which is expected to be completed by October. The paved trail will be more gradual and slightly longer, maybe another 1/10th of a mile, if that. As for how long it takes to walk out to the overlook, that depends entirely on the individual. 10 minutes is a fairly accurate estimate, taking the trail at a moderate pace, however, there’s no law stating that you have to take it at anyone’s pace but your own. Indeed, taking the time to look around you will give you a better appreciation of the geology of the area, and not leave you out of breath — well, the view at the end of the trail might take your breath away! Horseshoe Bend: The Intimate Grand Canyon Experience
          Now if you were to visit Horseshoe Bend on the shuttle with Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon tours, they access the overlook via private property on the Navajo Reservation (they’re Navajo owned), where the path to the overlook is only 200 yards.
          Hope that helps,
          Alley 🙂

    2. Hello,

      Are there restrooms at Horseshoe bend? How many hours should I plan to be here?
      we will be visiting in September after Labor Day
      Is it possible to get parking at 10am-11am?

      1. Hi Nicole!
        Yes, there are restrooms at Horseshoe Bend (yay!). Most visitors spend on average 60-90 minutes, but you are welcome to linger as long as you wish. As for the parking situation between 10:00 – 11:00 AM, that’s when it’s busiest, so can’t vouch for what you’ll find. Let’s just say if you can find a way to get there earlier — as in just after sunrise — you’ll enjoy cooler temperatures and thinner crowds.
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

      2. Hi Alley,
        I am planning for my first trip to Canyons with my family (2 adults and one 3 year old) from New York .
        Day 1: Fly to Phoenix on a Friday and stay near Phoenix
        Day 2: On Saturday morning Drive to Grand Canyon From Phoenix and cover the grand canyons as possible and stay in Page,AZ
        Day 3: on Sunday Cover Antelope canyons ( upper, lower and boat tours) and view horseshoe bend in the late evening and stay in Page
        Day 4: On Monday cover nearby attractions to Page and start to drive to Phoenix by evening
        Day 5: On Tuesday Fly back to New York from Phoenix .

        Few things I would like to get expert opinion would be on the below
        1) for my day 3 plan, can my 3 year old daughter be in all the tours or is there age restrictions and is there any bundled package tours available
        2) for my day 4 what would be the recommendations to cover by, also I am open to extend my trip by one day and cover other natural scenic places near by.

        Have a great day .

        Thanks & Regards,
        Santosh

        1. Hi Santosh,
          Before I address your specific questions, I need to tell you that on day 2, where you’re planning to drive from Phoenix to the Grand Canyon, then on to Page, AZ, this won’t work. It takes approximately 4.5 hours to drive from Phoenix to Grand Canyon South Rim. It then takes roughly 3.5-4 hours to drive from the Grand Canyon to Page, AZ. I know that Google maps gives the drive time between GC and Page as 2.5 hours, but that’s wheels turning, no stopping. That rarely happens since the drive is very scenic and you will want to stop and take photos, especially on the section of road between Grand Canyon Village and Desert View Point. You should also take the opportunity to visit the Cameron Trading Post. It would be a shame to have to rush such a pretty drive because you’re racing against the clock to get to your next destination. Another consideration: you don’t want to do any driving around here after sunset. Roads are very dimly lit (a deliberate move in order to reduce light pollution), plus deer, elk, free range cattle, and other animals may be present, which ratchets up your risk of an auto accident. That’s not something you want to risk in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold (if you’re traveling in the winter or early spring), where cell phone service is spotty to non-existent, and a tow truck will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. A better plan would be to overnight at the Grand Canyon, then drive on the Page, AZ, the next morning.
          Regarding taking your 3-year-old daughter on Antelope Canyon tours, the concessioner for Upper Antelope Canyon that offers bundled tours unfortunately does not allow children under the age of 6. The two concessioners that do allow younger children are:
          Roger Ekis’ Antelope Slot Canyon Tours, downtown Page, Arizona, http://www.antelopecanyon.com, 928-645-9102
          Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours, US98, between Mile Markers 299 & 300, http://www.navajotours.com,928-698-3384
          Since Lower Antelope Canyon requires more physical exertion, namely, you’ll probably have to carry your child for all or part of the tour, I’d recommend saving that for when your child is older. If this trip will be a once-in-a-lifetime chance to experience the Antelope Canyons, at least watch this full video walk-through of Lower Antelope Canyon before committing. If you decide to go ahead with it, you’ll need to book directly with the one of the two tour companies that manage that section of Antelope Canyon:
          Dixie Ellis’ Antelope Lower Canyon Tours, http://www.antelopelowercanyon.com, 928-640-1761
          Ken’s Lower Antelope Canyon Tours, http://www.lowerantelope.com, 928-606-2168 or 928-660-2350
          Infants and toddlers are permitted on the Antelope Canyon Boat Tours, but here again, you would need to book this directly through the tour operator since the bundles only allow children 6 and up. The tour operator for the Antelope Canyon Boat Tour is Antelope Point Marina, who can be reached by phone at 928-608-4477. Also, read this article on our companion site: http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Bringing Kids
          On day 4, plan to visit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise on your way back to Phoenix. You’ll have an easier time with parking then, and fewer people to contend with. If desired, you might take the time to tour the Wupatki/Sunset Crater Loop Drive just North of Flagstaff, which will add another 2-3 hours onto your drive. Or, if you can spare another night, give that to Sedona, AZ. It’s a stunning area with a lot to see and do, and will put you just 2 hours from Phoenix when you’re ready to depart!
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

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