See the Canyon from the River – Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip

When you are standing on the edge of Horseshoe Bend, you may notice some tan or brown rafts floating down the river. These visitors are enjoying the only half-day rafting trip on the Colorado River from the base of Glen Canyon Dam.

The Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip offers the most fantastic one day rafting trip anywhere on the mighty Colorado River. These half-day tours are perfect for the entire family (kids aged 4 and up).

Departing from the scenic town of Page, Arizona, your trip will begin with an exciting and exclusive ride down the two-mile long Glen Canyon Dam access tunnel. At river level, Glen Canyon Dam soars 700 feet above you, where you will board a comfortable pontoon raft for your journey downstream. For the next 3 hours, you will experience one of the most placid, yet dramatic stretches of river in the western United States. Your experienced guide will tell the story of the area’s soaring sandstone cliffs, crystal blue-green waters, abundant wildlife, exploration by Major John Wesley Powell and others. You will learn more about the river’s modern role in the Southwest’s water and power delivery system.

A stop to view an impressive set of ancient petroglyphs will offer a you chance to stretch your legs and enjoy your lunch while bearing witness to the area’s former inhabitancy by ancient native cultures. If you choose, you may also refresh yourself by wading in the cold, clear river. The Half Day Float through Glen Canyon to the Grand Canyon is not a rafting trip you will forget. Bring your family and enjoy an incredible day on the the Colorado River!

166 Responses

  1. Good Evening,
    Family and I will traveling from Chicago to Las Vegas. Staying in Vegas for 2 days and then spending 1 night at the Grand Canyon. We will only be there for 24 hours. Can you suggest a few things to do to enjoy the beauty of the canyon. From the Grand Canyon we will be traveling to Lake Powell for 2 nights. We would love to Kayak Horseshoe bend but perhaps only 4 hours max. Is this possible? In addition to kayaking we would like to rent a boat for a day. Do you have a suggestion. As many others are hoping we are also hoping Antelope will open by then too. From Lake Powell we will be traveling to Zion for a day to do the Angels Landing hike. Some have suggested that Kanarra Falls is a must, what are your thoughts? Would that be something to catch on the way to Zion from Lake Powell. We will be staying at Under Canvas at all locations. Thanks so much for any information and companies that provide services or any other must sees that you think we can fit in on our short trek.

    1. Hi Julie!
      24 hours is plenty of time to have a fulfilling visit to the Grand Canyon. In fact, a good chunk of your sightseeing of the Grand Canyon will occur on the drive to Page, AZ, as long as AZ64 East remains open between Desert View Point and Cameron. If for some reason the Navajo Tribe opts to close it again, which they’re pushing for, you’ll have to drive down to Flagstaff, AZ, then up to Page, AZ, from the South Rim. That would turn what should be ~a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive. Should that happen while you’re here, then concentrate your Grand Canyon sightseeing around Grand Canyon Village. Walk the easy, paved Rim Trail, ride the free shuttles out to the viewpoints on the Hermit’s Rest Road, then maybe catch the IMAX movie, “Grand Canyon: The Hidden Secrets” in Tusayan. Grand Canyon Under Canvas is located in the town of Valle, AZ aka Grand Canyon Junction ~30 minutes South of Grand Canyon Village.
      At Lake Powell, choose between doing the kayak tour and renting a boat. Doing both will be redundant. Boats can be rented at Antelope Point Marina or Lake Powell Resort. For easiest access to the waterside of Antelope Canyon, Antelope Point Marina is ideally located, but Lake Powell Resort is closer to Lake Powell Under Canvas, which is located in Big Water, UT, ~20 minutes from Page, AZ. All Under Canvas locations are going to be somewhat removed from the main tourist towns, which has both pros and cons. You’ll be among the first to stay at Lake Powell Under Canvas, so we’d love to hear what your experience was like!
      I would not try to include Kanarra Falls in your trip plans. Not that it isn’t beautiful, but it is not conveniently located between Lake Powell and Zion. It’s closer to Cedar City, UT, which is ~90 minutes North of Zion. Also, it requires an advance permit to visit, which is fairly easy to obtain, but it sounds like your time is limited and Kanarra will be a bit of a ways out of your way.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. We’ve been reading your advice to others traveling to Page and have a question. Is it possible to rent a jet ski at Wahweap Marina and make it to horseshoe bend and back? Is it easy to find and what is the approximate distance? Or can you recommend a different marina or other options, we are really disappointed that’s the River float is booked for our travel dates. Thank you!

        1. Hey Pam,
          The Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip did sell out quickly for this season. Thanks, COVID-19! *sarcasm*
          Sorry to report that it’s not possible to take a personal watercraft from Lake Powell Resort to Horseshoe Bend. The Glen Canyon Dam is literally standing in your way, and it would be a 700′ drop to the river! However, it is possible to drive down to Lees Ferry (~1 hour from Page), rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle the 15 miles through Horseshoe Bend (~5 miles downstream from the dam) back to Lees Ferry. Though this portion of the trip is unguided, first-time kayakers do it all the time and have a blast! There are several companies offering this type of service, but the one we’re most familiar with is Kayak Horseshoe Bend.
          Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

      2. Hi Alley,
        I am planning a trip arriving in PHX Saturday, May 29 staying through Monday, June 7. The float trip is full so we are looking into kayaking. Would you please advise on which kayaking trip you feel to be most scenic. I have looked at Horseshoe bend and Antelope Canyon. Would love to hear your thoughts and suggestions.

        We will drive to South Rim and spend Sunday morning and early afternoon there, then drive to Goulding’s for Sunday night. If you could provide information for 2-3 days of activities in Page we would really appreciate it!

        Thank you for all of your assistance, and planning tips! Really enjoy your posts!

        1. Hi Gayle,
          Kayaking Horseshoe Bend and/or Antelope Canyon would take you through two different waterside perspectives, both of which are incredibly scenic! In Glen Canyon and Horseshoe Bend, you’d be paddling between 700′ high sandstone canyon walls that remain at the same width pretty much throughout the entire 15 mile journey from the base of Glen Canyon Dam back to Lees Ferry. It’s a more wide open, consistent landscape than the Antelope Canyon kayaking experience, where you start off on the shore of Lake Powell, then paddle into the waterside of Antelope Canyon. There, the canyon walls are not as high as in Glen Canyon, but they gradually close in on you, growing narrower and narrower as you paddle toward the shoreline of Lake Powell that joins with the pre-slot portion of the lower canyon, where you an do a little hiking if you wish. On the Kayak Horseshoe Bend trip, you also have the option of stopping at Petroglyph Beach to take a short hike to view a panel of ancient rock art carvings. Either activity is best done first thing in the morning to take advantage of cooler temperatures, less wind, and less chop from larger boat traffic. Long story short: it’s hard to go wrong either way. You can pretty much make the choice by flipping a coin and have a blast either way it falls!
          As for other activities you might enjoy while in Page, AZ, choices include, but are not limited to:
          Page Rim View Trail
          Glen Canyon Dam/Steel Arch Bridge
          Hanging Garden Trail & The Chains
          Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook
          Grand View Overlook Park
          The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
          Gunfighter Canyon
          Wahweap Overlook
          Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach (located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time)
          If you have the time/inclination to venture a short distance into Utah, you might also hit:
          Big Water Visitors Center & Dinosaur Museum
          Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail
          Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  2. My husband and I planned a trip for 4/28 thru 5/2 with the intent that Antelope Canyon would be open. Now that we’ve found out it won’t be, we have no planned events. What is open in and around the area and if you have any info on day spas please advise.

    1. Hey Bama Wife,
      So sorry that the closure of the Antelope Canyons has thrown a bit of a wrinkle into your vacation plans, but you’ll be happy to know that other options for fun and exploration abound in Page, AZ!
      If you’ve never tried kayaking, you might consider kayak tour into the waterside of Antelope Canyon, then hiking into the pre-slot portion of the lower section of the canyon, which is on Federal and not Tribal Land. This activity is best done first thing in the morning for lack of wind and minimal chop from larger boat traffic since this is in a wake zone on Lake Powell.
      Even if you don’t take us up on that suggestion, other sites open for visitation in Page, AZ, include but aren’t limited to:
      – Page Rim View Trail
      – Glen Canyon Dam/Steel Arch Bridge
      – Hanging Garden Trail & The Chains
      – Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook
      – Grand View Overlook Park
      – The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
      – Gunfighter Canyon
      – Wahweap Overlook
      – Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach (located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time)
      If you have the time and/or inclination to venture a short distance into Utah, other activities you might partake in are:
      – Big Water Visitors Center & Dinosaur Museum (~20 minutes from Page)
      – Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail (~45 minutes from Page, trailhead at mile marker 19 on US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT)
      For day spas, good locations for these would be St. George, UT, ~2.5 hours Northwest of Page, or Sedona, AZ, ~3 hours South of Page.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi, I love your recommendations! What is kid and dog friendly? We’re planning a camping trip July 23-26th. We want to do Sunrise hikes in both horseshoe bend and antelope canyon then water play most of the day. We do have a van camper that we will be using for transport. Can you recommend a fun itinerary and camping spots near each?

        Thanks.
        Tatyana.

        1. Hi Tatyana,
          Some sites in Page, AZ, are more dog-friendly than others. For example, you can bring dogs to Horseshoe Bend as long as they are leashed at all times and you pick up after them. In July, it will be very hot, so be sure you bring enough water for yourselves and your pet. A set of protective booties for your dog’s paws are also highly recommended to protect them from hot sand.
          Dogs are prohibited on walking tours of Antelope Canyon, which we are not certain will reopen by the time you visit. They also cannot be brought on boat tours, but are OK on rented boats. If you need to board your dog at any point during your stay, Pampered Pets and the Page Animal Hospital can help with this.
          For camping, I would recommend you stay in developed RV parks. Again, July is going to be very hot and you’ll want access to AC at that time of year, otherwise, you won’t get a good night’s sleep in a sweltering van. Campgrounds with electrical hook-ups near Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon, and Lake Powell are the Page/Lake Powell Campground in Page, AZ and the Wahweap Campground at Lake Powell Resort. The latter is located inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which means you’d have to pay the $30/vehicle entrance fee, which is good for one week’s time, and is not included in your RV park fee.
          Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Gabriella,
      Yes, it is possible to kayak on Lake Powell. This activity is best done first thing in the morning for lack of wind and minimal chop from larger boats. If you have your own kayaks, you can launch out of Antelope Point Marina or Wahweap Marina near Page, AZ. Kayak rental outlets are also situated in Page, AZ, for the most part, with a few located in Big Water, UT, ~20 minutes away.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. Hi Gabriella
      A couple of girls and I are going to kayak the horseshoe Bend and I’ll be on a paddleboard. Do you recommend a hard board or an inflatable Board to do this trip.

      1. Hi Sharonne,
        Gabriella may not be monitoring responses, but I can tell you that the majority of paddleboards used on Lake Powell are hard boards. However, you are always welcome to call any of the SUP rental outfitters in Page, AZ, to discuss this matter with them directly.
        – Lake Powell Paddleboards and Kayaks – 928-645-4017
        – WazSUP Kayak Rental 602-233-2847
        – Lake Powell Rentals & Retail 928-614-8573
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

  3. We will be in Page, AZ on June 11-12th. We are looking for a half day float trip down thru Horseshoe Bend. Have not been able to find any trips available. Will there be more company’s offering this trip opening up soon?

    1. Hey Jim,
      There is only one company offering the Horseshoe Bend float trip, Wilderness River Adventures. According to their website, they will start offering the trip on May 18th, with departures occurring once daily at 10:30 AM (9:30 AM check-in). For more information, visit RiverAdventures.com/Horseshoe-Bend-Rafting-Trips
      If you have already checked with them and they are sold out — which is not surprising — a good alternative would be to drive down to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, and paddle the 15 mile stretch of the Colorado River through Horseshoe Bend back to Lees Ferry. The kayak portion is unguided, but lots of first-time kayakers do it and have a ball! There are several companies that provide this service, but the one we’re most familiar with is Kayak Horseshoe Bend.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  4. Hi Alley, We just booked a trip to AZ. So excited – We have 2 teenage girls. Were modernly active. We are staying in Scottsdale – planning on going up to the Grand Canyon for a few days – We would love to do a 1 day rating trip – any thoughts on which company is great? Do you have any insight as to when the Antelope trails may open or how they will book it? Also, ideas of the best things to do near the South Rim? Maybe a hike? things to see?

    Sedona – if were to stop on the way back any 1-2 thing worth not missing –

    Thank you for your knowledge.

    Vickie

    1. Hi Vickie,
      If you’re wanting to do a 1 day white water rafting trip, the bad news is there’s only one available in the Grand Canyon, and it’s a bit far away from the National Park. It’s operated by Hualapai River Running out of Peach Springs, AZ, ~3 hours drive (1 way) from Grand Canyon South Rim. Because it is an all-day trip (12-14 hours depending on how you get pulled off the river) that starts early in the morning, it is best to stay overnight in Peach Springs, AZ, the night prior to the trip, and probably the night after the trip since the nearest towns with lodging are 90 minutes-2 hours away. Grand Canyon One Day White Water Self-Drive
      If that won’t be practical this time around, the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Experience out of Page, AZ, is a good trip, too. It doesn’t go through any rapids, but what it may lack in excitement, it makes up for in beautiful scenery and compelling history!
      I don’t recall seeing when your trip was scheduled for, but right now the Antelope Canyon walking tours are closed by order of the Navajo Indian Tribe. We have no idea when they might reopen. If it should remain closed at the time of your visit, a good alternative would be to kayak into the waterside of the canyon on Lake Powell, and hike into the “pre-slot” portion of the Lower canyon, which is on Federal and not Tribal land. Kayak tours are best done during the earlier morning hours for less wind and minimal chop from larger boat traffic. There are several companies offering this activity, but the one we are most familiar with is Lake Powell Hidden Canyon Kayak.
      If for some reason that does not appeal, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic slot canyon that is relatively family-friendly, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a dry streambed, which is usually full of deep sugar sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights, but a recently placed ladder has made this obstacle easier to navigate. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee in advance or at the kiosk by the trailhead. The House Rock Valley Road is unpaved, and while it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. Companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch are:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      RE: Sedona, visiting as a “drive-by” on the way back to Scottsdale will leave you wanting! This is a huge and stunning area with lots to see and do. It really deserves 3-4 days of your time to fully enjoy and explore. If a drive-through is all you can manage, I’d recommend stopping by the Chapel of the Holy Cross and Slide Rock State Park.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  5. Hi Alley!

    Thank you so much for all the information you are providing on here. I planned a three-day trip to Phoenix next week. I was hoping Antelope Canyon would be open by now, but I see that it’s not. I’m open to driving up to five hours in any direction of Phoenix. Don’t really plan on doing much hiking or any kayaking, so it’s mostly sightseeing and enjoying the views. One stop I for sure want to make is the Chapel of the Holy Cross in Sedona. I also have never been to the Grand Canyon. What are some must-sees that you recommend? Or what’s the most time-efficient itinerary that you recommend?

    1. Hi Anna,
      You are correct that the Antelope Canyons are not open at this time, and we do not expect them to reopen by the time you arrive. If you’re not into kayaking, then, as much as I hate to say it, you might consider skipping Page, AZ, this time around and use your 3 days to concentrate on Grand Canyon South Rim and Sedona. Instead of making day trips from PHX (your inquiry kind of implies that that was your plan), book 1 night at the Grand Canyon (it’s ~5 hours from Phoenix), then schedule 2 nights in Sedona for the back end of your trip. For one, that area has a lot to see and do, plus it’s a great place to relax and chill before driving back to Phoenix, which will only take ~2 hours.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  6. We are travelling with a three year old in our group of 16. is it possible for him to go on the half day tour or is 4 the absolute minimum age?

    1. Hi Christa,
      4 YO is the minimum age they can take due to insurance/liability reasons.
      Sorry.
      Alley 🙂

  7. I wanted to kayak antelope canyon on my own without a tour guide. Is it pretty easy to navigate by your self? I don’t want to get lost.

    1. Hi Shannon,
      This is a great question, and the answer is yes, you absolutely can take your own kayak into the waterside of Antelope Canyon, and it is very easy to navigate on your own. The best place to launch out of is Antelope Point Marina. Note that this is inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, requiring payment of the National Park Fee of $30/vehicle (that’s good for one week’s time, and also grants you access to the lake at the Lake Powell Resort complex, just hang on to your receipt!). The staff there can provide you with a map, or you can find one on our companion site http://www.AntelopeCanyonBoatTours.com
      I would advise you to launch first thing in the morning. That way you can take advantage of conditions with less wind, and fewer large boats out and about, which you’ll appreciate since the majority of your route will be in a wake zone.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  8. HI Ally, what a great resource you are. I am wondering if you are able to suggest some activities that my family should do. We are planning to visit the North Rim in late August 2021. We are a family of 4, with two teenagers ( ages 17 and 14) and every family member is fairly athletic and has done a decent amount of hiking. We took a trip 3 years ago and hit Bryce, Zion, and Arches. We had such a good time, we’re doing more National Parks this year. Since we’ll be at the North Rim, we wanted to extend our trip and see a few other things around Horse Shoe Bend. What would you recommend for activities and things not to miss? Typically, we don’t like traveling in large groups and given the option, would prefer to go it alone if we can. I’m going to thank you in advance for your response. Looking all the wonderful advice you’ve already dispensed, I can’t wait to see what you have to recommend!

    1. Hi Jane,
      First thing’s first: I hope you have your lodging reservations in place at the North Rim already! North Rim rooms are in high demand this year, and they’re doing a staggered roll-out of time blocks, which has been a huge pain in the tookus. I’m going to assume that you do have this part of your trip plan in place for now.
      So between Grand Canyon North Rim and Page, AZ, you’ve got lots of opportunities for great hikes and other sightseeing. We’re crossing fingers and toes that the Antelope Canyons will reopen by the time you visit. The land-side of Antelope Canyon (Upper Antelope, Lower Antelope, Antelope X, Secret Antelope, etc.) require guided tours to access, so being with a group is pretty much unavoidable there. If you were to visit one of the alternate drainages, such as Antelope X, Secret Antelope, Mystical, Cathedral, etc., they intentionally keep group sizes smaller… for a price, of course. Here again, that’s all speculation at this point because the Antelope Canyons, and all Navajo Tribal parks, such as Monument Valley, Little Colorado River, Moenkopi Dinosaur Tracks, etc., are closed by order of the Navajo Tribe.
      If you’ve dismissed the notion of taking an Antelope Canyon tour altogether, another option that you might consider is kayaking into the waterside of the canyon from Antelope Point Marina, then hiking into the pre-slot portion of the Lower canyon, which is on Federal and not Tribal land. While the scenery isn’t quite the “picture postcard” slot canyon scenery you may be expecting, it is still pretty, and judging by the number of sold out dates last year, lots of people agreed. You can rent kayaks, or go with a guided tour to the waterside of Antelope Canyon. This activity is best done first thing in the morning for lack of wind and minimal “chop” from large boat traffic on the lake.
      Between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, you have the opportunity to hike the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail, which is easy, but a ton of fun. Another cool slot canyon is Wire Pass Canyon and Buckskin Gulch. Video of a young family hiking both trails: Look Who’s Blogging | Wire Pass Canyon Buckskin Gulch | Paria Rimrocks & Toadstools In both areas, you will see other people, but the ruggedness of the terrain tends to discourage large hordes of them. In August, one thing you have to be aware of is that it’s monsoon season, and slot canyons are particularly vulnerable to flash flooding with afternoon storms. If there is a flash flood warning in place, or someone warns you not to go into these canyons, please heed them. The Wire Pass Canyon Trailhead is on an unpaved road (House Rock Valley Road) which turns into a mud slip-n-slide after it rains, so you’d have to unfortunately nix this activity should weather turn inclement.
      ~20 miles outside of Fredonia, AZ, is an interesting little spot called Pipe Spring National Monument. It provides a very illuminating glimpse into the lives of early pioneers to this area, and what they had to go through to eke out a living in this often inhospitable terrain. Another site that has similar educational value is the Lees Ferry/Lonely Dell Ranch Historic Site, which is ~1 hour from Page, AZ. This is one of the rare spots you can actually drive a vehicle up relatively close to the Colorado River and dip your feet in. A walk across the Navajo Bridge might offer the chance to see California Condors sunning themselves on the bridge struts. The section of US89A from Lees Ferry to Cliff Dwellers takes you along the Southern edge of Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, where there’s a sizeable balanced rock garden visible from the road. Cliff Dweller’s Restaurant is a wonderful stop for brunch or dinner (they don’t do lunch), but save room for dessert so you can get cookies at Jacob Lake Inn.
      This map will show you where everything is in relation to one another, but I’m not suggesting that you try and cram them all into one day, by any means! I’d recommend trying to set aside a night or two in Page, AZ, or Kanab, UT in order to accommodate these areas most comfortably.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  9. Hi. I have read through your replies, and so much to take in. We are staying 5 nights at Under Canvas Lake Powell/Grand Staircase and then driving to Grand Canyon location for 1 night. We have 4 full days in Lake Powell area and then plan to see (not sure the best route) the Grand Canyon on day 5. We have a 10 and 12 yo. We are novice hikers, but have on occasion done a few hour one. We want to experience as many adventures as we can (hiking, horseback riding, kayaking/paddle boarding and/or rafting). We are open to UTV’s too. I saw your note re: the Navajo land. Can you point me in the right direction on what you would do in those days. Keeping in mind the current restrictions and then if they are lifted what that opens us up to. Many tanks in advance!

    1. Hi Shellyn,
      Congrats on being one of Lake Powell Under Canvas’ first customers. This is their first operating season, and we hope you enjoy your stay there!
      One key piece of information missing from your inquiry is the time of year you’re traveling. I’m going to go off the assumption that your trip is occurring during spring, or maybe late summer?
      One thing I should point out is that LP Under Canvas’ location is in the town of Big Water, UT, which is about 20 minutes drive away from Page, AZ. If you want to do some paddle boarding or kayaking, obviously Lake Powell will be the place to do it. With the Antelope Canyons on Navajo Indian Land being closed to tourism, you could still tick this off your wish list by taking a kayak tour into the waterside of Antelope Canyon from Antelope Point Marina, which includes some hiking into the “pre-slot” portion of the canyon that is on Federal and not Tribal land. SUP tour options are also available. Kayak and SUP tours are best taken in the morning, when it is less windy. Be sure to hit the Horseshoe Bend Overlook afterwards.
      As for hiking, you could make a day trip to Zion National Park ~90 minutes from LP Under Canvas. There’s some stellar hiking to be done there, and much of it is relatively easy. You would have to utilize the Zion Canyon Shuttle to get to most trailheads, which may require advance ticket purchase.
      If you preferred to remain more local, good hikes closer to LP Under Canvas are the Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch, and the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail. Both are near the settlement of Paria, UT. For more information, here’s a video depicting a young family doing both of these activities using Page, AZ, as a base: Look Who’s Blogging | Wire Pass Canyon | Paria Rimrocks & Toadstools
      For horseback riding, normally I would recommend Horseshoe Bend Trail Rides, but seeing as though they’ll probably be closed at the time of your visit, you might make a day trip up to Bryce Canyon for that. That will require ~4-5 hours of driving, round-trip, and it’s important that you keep an eye on the time so you don’t risk doing any of the drive back to Big Water, UT, at night. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit, plus the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife that could hike up your risk of an auto accident. Trust me, that’s not something you want to risk in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, possibly cold (Bryce is 8,000′ ASL), where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive!
      UTV tours can be taken out of Page, AZ. Not sure if they would be willing to swing up to Big Water, UT, to collect you, but it never hurts to ask!
      Of course, among all this adventure and excitement, you’ll want to be sure to include some chill time so you can explore and discover things at your own pace. When you get ready to head down to Grand Canyon South Rim, unfortunately, you will be affected by a road closure on Navajo Tribal Land. Due to the closure of AZ64 East from Desert View Point to Cameron, AZ, it is necessary to drive all the way down to Flagstaff, AZ, then continue North on US89 to get to Page, AZ. This has turned what is normally ~a 3-hour drive into more along the lines of a 5-hour trip. If you’re of a mind to “make lemonade out of lemons,” you could take advantage of the opportunity to enjoy the Wupatki/Sunset Crater Loop Drive, just North of Flagstaff, AZ, which will take you by a Sinaguan Indian dwelling complex (a rather sophisticated one at that) and a dormant volcano. Naturally, this will add more time to your trip, but the option is there for you 😉 Trip map
      Like Lake Powell Under Canvas, Grand Canyon Under Canvas is located outside the park a fair distance, near the town of Valle, AZ, so you’ll need to plan for a 30-minute drive, each way, to get to and from the park on your sightseeing days. Same rule applies about night driving (best to avoid). Be sure you’re aware of when sunrise and sunset occurs.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Alley,

        I have learned so much from reading your posts. Thank you so much! I just wish I can come across this a few weeks ago to better plan. We are actually an hour away from Page now! We have 3 kids with us, 17, 11, & 6. Antelope and horseshoe were in our list but now looking for just horseshoe on kayaks unguided. We will only be here two days so shifting into a relaxing plan instead. Are there any resorts that have heated pools, hot tubs, and maybe a bar entertainment for families and adults all in one property? Not big into boating or lake swimming. Prefer pools. We will be heading to Nebraska on our way home so ok with staying anywhere on Lake Powell to the East for the way home. Also, any good local restaurants to try? We went on many hikes already so not looking to a lot more hiking. Maybe renting bicycles and riding the lake and shopping some little local shops, food, etc. Thanks!
        April B.

        1. Hey April,
          The place that has everything you’re looking for near Page, AZ, is the Lake Powell Resort. It’s in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so you’d have to pay the $30/vehicle entrance fee into the park, but it has a pool, hot tub, restaurant and cocktail lounge onsite. Unfortunately, some of the on-site food and beverage outlets are closed due to COVID-19, but you’d probably like its location and the fact that it’s self-contained. Should Lake Powell Resort not have availability, or it doesn’t appeal for some reason, the Courtyard by Marriott would probably be the next best choice for a place with a pool, restaurant, bar, etc. on-site. Here again, you might encounter some limitations on services due to COVID-19.
          For suggestions of restaurants, visit the Page/Lake Powell Tourism hub. I’m fond of Strombolli’s (Italian), Bonkers (variety), the Blue Buddha (sushi), and Slackers (burgers, sandwiches).
          Enjoy your visit, and drive safe back to Nebraska.
          Alley 🙂

  10. Alley,

    First of all, thank you so much for all the amazing helpful information!! My husband, two daughters (7 and 12) will be coming to AZ middle of April. We are staying in Chandler area for a few days then planning on heading north to Grand Canyon and want to make the most of the 3-4 nights we have to stay there!

    We are interested in floating the river, horseback riding, jeep tour, light day-trip hiking, etc…not sure how restricted/closed things are due to COVID.

    Can you help with some more specifics or recommendations for our family?

    Thank you so much!!!

    1. Hi Melissa!
      The ability to tick off all the items on your “wish list” is highly contingent on the Navajo Indian Tribe opening their lands up to tourism in the wake of COVID-19. We’re wishing, hoping, and praying that this can happen by mid-April; whether or not it will, remains to be seen, obviously. Another “wrinkle” is that the popular Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip (your best option for floating the river) is on suspension until May, but there is an alternative to that. More on that in a minute 😉
      So here’s what I’d recommend:
      Day 1: Drive from Chandler, AZ, to Page, AZ (~4.5 hours), hit Horseshoe Bend Overlook on the way into town, overnight in Page.
      Day 2: Drive down to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, and paddle the 15-mile smooth stretch of the Colorado River back to Lees Ferry. The kayak paddle is unguided, but many first-time kayakers do it without a problem. There are several companies offering this service, the ones we’re most familiar with are Kayak Horseshoe Bend and Wilderness River Adventures. 2nd night in Page, AZ If the Navajo Tribe has opened up by the time of your visit, you might do a horseback ride with Horseshoe Bend Trail Rides in the afternoon, or early the next morning.
      Day 3: Drive to Grand Canyon South Rim ***here’s where a road closure will most likely affect you: normally, the drive takes ~3 hours, but due to the necessity of detouring through Flagstaff, AZ [again, due to a closure on Navajo land], it will take you more along the lines of 5 hours*** overnight in Grand Canyon
      Day 4: Early AM – hike to Ooh Aah Point on the South Kaibab Trail (use of a shuttle required to get to the trailhead at Yaki Point), or to 1.5 Mile Resthouse on Bright Angel Trail, or walk as long as desired on the paved Rim Trail. Should Horseshoe Bend Trail Rides not be open, you might also take a horseback ride through Apache Stables in Tusayan, AZ. Note that their rides only travel through the forest and not near the canyon. Spend 2nd night in Grand Canyon, or drive back to Chandler (~4-4.5 hours)
      Trip map
      Should the kayak through Horseshoe Bend not appeal, you might check out “lazy river” type parks in the Phoenix area, or float trip options on the nearby Salt River. Phoenix area float trips
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  11. Hi,
    We are flying into Phoenix on June 6; driving to Sedona. Hiking Cathedral Trail then driving up to Page. Staying in Lake Powell overnight. Originally wanted to see Antelope Canyon the next day but due to Covid we are going to Horseshoe Bend then driving up to Zion later that day. We will be staying in Springdale a couple of days. I’m wondering if we should head right up to Zion after seeing Horse Shoe Bend? I’m worried about driving in that area when it gets dark. We are all adults, no children. If we did a half day rafting trip, do you think we could drive up to Zion before it got dark?
    Thank you for any information.

    1. Hi Annmaria,
      Apologies for the delay in response to your inquiry. I have been out of town for a few days.
      One thing I would advise against, if I’m reading your question correctly, is hiking the Cathedral Trail in Sedona as a “stopover” between Phoenix and Page. It takes ~5 hours to get from Phoenix to Page, AZ, as it is. The detour through Sedona will add another hour to ninety minutes onto your trip, wheels turning, no stops. The Cathedral Trail hike will add another couple of hours, minimum to your trip time, not counting the time it takes to find a parking space and purchase a Red Rock Trail Pass. In light of those concerns, I would give Sedona a miss this time around, but definitely plan a return trip when you can give it the time it deserves to enjoy and explore more fully. A 4-5 day stay would not be too long to take advantage of all the Sedona area has to offer!
      There is a possibility, albeit a rather remote one, that the Antelope Canyons might reopen by the time you visit. In which case, you should plan on staying overnight in Page, AZ, maybe even two nights if you wanted to take the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip. Speaking of the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip, it, too has been on hiatus due to COVID-19. We are crossing fingers and toes that it is able to resume by this summer season, but in the event it doesn’t, a popular alternative is to drive down to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle the 15-mile stretch of the Colorado River back to Lees Ferry. Although the kayak part of the excursion is unguided, first-time kayakers do it all the time and report having a blast! There are several companies offering this service, but the one we are most familiar with is Kayak Horseshoe Bend.
      Should the Horseshoe Bend raft trip resume running at the time of your visit, the afternoon departure typically gets done around 4:00 PM, which would give you enough time to get to Zion by dark. The only disadvantage of taking the afternoon trip is that it will be very hot on the river. We tend to recommend the morning departure if at all possible during the summer months.
      Whatever you decide, you are right to be concerned about the safety of nighttime driving, anywhere in Northern Arizona and Southern Utah. Once you get past Flagstaff, AZ, local roads are very dimly lit, which is a deliberate move in some areas to preserve the natural darkness of the night sky. One advantage to traveling in June is that your days will be relatively long: sunrise on June 6th occurs at about 5:00 AM and sunset takes place just before 8:00 PM. Remember that Utah will be one hour ahead of Page, AZ, so, 6:00 AM for sunrise, 9:00 PM for sunset in Zion, Bryce, etc.
      Hope that helps! Again, sorry for the late reply.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  12. Hi Alley,

    I know hear the Antelope Canyon is closed right now because of Covid. I want to go and see the Horse Shoe Bend in Page, Az. What else can I go and see while there. Maybe I will plan a trip for 5 days? I been on the Grand Canyon, twice already. I would love your ideas and tips. Thank you!

    Sandra Hernandez/ NJ

    1. Hi Markita,
      If you’re wanting to make a reservation for the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip, unfortunately, you cannot do so for March 10th. That trip has been put on temporary suspension due to COVID-19. We don’t know when it will resume. You can visit the Horseshoe Bend Overlook (topside) anytime between sunrise and sunset 7 days a week, and that is one of a few attractions that never closed during the pandemic.
      If floating through Horseshoe Bend on the Colorado River was high on your priority list — and I don’t blame you a bit if it was! — an alternative you might consider is driving down to Lees Ferry, renting a kayak, getting backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddling (unescorted) back to Lees Ferry 15 miles down the Colorado River. While the paddling portion is unguided, many first-time kayakers take part in this activity and really enjoy it. There are several local companies that offer this service:
      – Kayak Horseshoe Bend 928-355-2211 https://kayakhorseshoebend.com/
      – Wilderness River Adventures (928) 645-3296 https://www.riveradventures.com/
      – Kelly Outfitters/Lees Ferry Backhaul (928) 510-5511 http://leesferrybackhaul.com/
      – Kayak The Colorado 928-856-0012 https://www.kayakthecolorado.com/
      – Lees Ferry On The Fly (928) 326-1162 https://leesferryonthefly.com/
      – Marble Canyon Outfitters 800-533-7339 https://www.leesferryflyfishing.com/
      The top two listed, Kayak Horseshoe Bend and Wilderness River Adventures, are the ones I’m most familiar with, but the other companies also have good reputations for safety and service.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  13. Hello Alley,
    My friends and are are planning to head that way Dec. 19-22. We were wanting to the Antelope Canyon, but due to COVID, it seems to be closed. Are we still able to get in without a tour guide? Same question on horseshoe bend.

    If not, do you have any adventures ideas we can do instead?

    Thank you in advance.

    1. Hi Priscilla,
      So sorry that the Antelope Canyons won’t be an option for you this time around. In answer to your specific query, you cannot access Antelope Canyon, or any of its alternate drainages, without a tour guide. Doing so constitutes trespassing, and all that that implies (fines, jail time, etc.). Please don’t risk it.
      The good news is that Horseshoe Bend is open; it’s one of a few attractions that never closed throughout this COVID-19 business. The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, 7 days a week. You pay a one-time $10 parking fee, and visit at your convenience. While Horseshoe Bend is a popular spot for sunset, I’m partial to sunrise because there is typically fewer people to compete with for a good photo spot.
      If visiting a slot canyon remains high on your priority list — and we don’t blame you a bit if it does! — the closest alternatives are Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT, and Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch near Paria, UT. For more information on visiting these alternate slot canyons, visit our companion site http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ and read “Help, My Antelope Canyon Tour Got Cancelled!”
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Alley, You seem to know so much about the local area. Do you know of a boating adventure we can take with a 3-year-old this summer? Nearly everything I have researched (rafting, floating, kayaking, duck boats, etc.) has an age requirement of 4. She is a very good adventurer and I can’t imaging there isn’t a half-day kayak/canoe/raft experience somewhere that would allow a 3 year old. Our other children will be 13, 10, and 6 so we’d like to get on the water together. We will be renting a speed boat on a separate day at Lake Powell.

        Thanks!
        Megan

        1. Hi Megan,
          Despite your 3-year-old’s hardiness, tour companies operating water-based activities have to have liability insurance, and that’s where the age limitation comes in. Unfortunately, it’s very strictly enforced.
          The only instance where an exception might be made — and again, I say, “might” — is if you were to drive down to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle 15 miles, unguided, down the Colorado River through Horseshoe Bend back to Lees Ferry. I heard that younger children are allowed to ride in tandem kayaks with adults, but again, I’m not 100% certain how young. I would strongly recommend calling one of the companies that operates the Lees Ferry-Glen Canyon backhaul services and ask them directly. Companies offering this service are:
          – Kayak Horseshoe Bend 928-355-2211 https://kayakhorseshoebend.com/
          – Wilderness River Adventures 928-645-3296 https://www.riveradventures.com/
          – Kelly Outfitters/Lees Ferry Backhaul 928-510-5511 http://www.kellyoutfitters.com/ http://leesferrybackhaul.com/
          – Kayak The Colorado 928-856-0012 https://www.kayakthecolorado.com/
          – Lees Ferry On The Fly 928-326-1162 https://leesferryonthefly.com/
          If you find out that these companies can’t or won’t accommodate a 3YO, though, I wouldn’t sweat it too much since you are renting a speed boat on Lake Powell during your vacation. Depending on how long you have the boat for, you might consider renting a kayak, tube, or other water toy onto your rental. Or, simply find a nice beach, put life vests on, and enjoy a refreshing swim in the lake. Sometimes keeping it simple makes for the best vacation memories!
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

          Marble Canyon Outfitters 800-533-7339 https://www.leesferryflyfishing.com/

  14. When doing the kayak horseshoe bend kayakhorseshoebend.com experience I read online that you can ask the shuttle to drop you off where ever and you kayak down to Lee’s Ferry. What would be the best place to get dropped off If you just want to Kayak the part of horseshoe bend? And about how long does it take to just do that section down to Lee’s Ferry where you can get out & return your kayak.
    Thank you!

    1. Hi Katlyn,
      This is a really good question! Horseshoe Bend is located approximately 5 miles down-river of the Glen Canyon Dam. That would reduce the distance you’d have to kayak to Lees Ferry to 10 miles. As to how long it would take, you could probably spend anywhere from a couple of hours to half a day, but the best place to get the real 4-1-1 on this would be the folks at Kayak Horseshoe Bend. Their phone # is (928) 355-2211 or to fill out the form on their contact page.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi! I’m excited to take my son on his first road trip to Arizona. My husband is excited to go off roading in Sedona. My plan is to stay one night in Las Vegas, drive to Page and visit Horsebend. Stay one night at Page and head to Sedona and stay for 3 days which we also want to visit Grand Canyon. Can you please tell me if this is a good plan and any additional recommendations is greatly appreciated.

        1. Hi Jen,
          Your trip plan looks pretty fun, and well-paced.
          As for visiting the Grand Canyon, lots of people do it from Sedona as a day trip, but the feasibility of it is highly dependent on the time of yeear in which you’re traveling.
          The drive from Sedona, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim is 2.5-3 hours, each way. If your visit is taking place during the timeframe between late spring through early fall, that gives you more hours of daylight to work with, and that is when all driving must take place. Driving at night is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to the fact that local roads are very dimly lit, and you might encounter deer, elk, or other wildlife, which can hike up your risk of an accident. That’s not something you want to chance in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
          If your trip is coming up here in the next few weeks time, sunrise occurs between 7:30 AM and 7:45 AM, sunset takes place around 5:30-5:45 PM. That’s 10 hours of daylight, at most, and you’d be eating up 5-6 hours of that time just driving back and forth from Sedona. That wouldn’t give you much time for sightseeing at the Grand Canyon.
          If you are indeed plannning to visit Northern Arizona between now and early Spring, and you’re not locked into any room reservations in Sedona, AZ, yet, plan your Grand Canyon trip as an overnight, maybe before you head back to Las Vegas to fly home. It is best to stay inside the park if possible, or in Tusayan should the in-park hotels be full already.
          If your trip is planned for the warmer months of the years that feature longer days, you should be able to pull off a day trip as long as you’re aware of when sunset occurs and that you time your return trip to Sedona, AZ, accordingly. The section us US89A from Flagstaff to Sedona through Oak Creek is very windy, narrow, and twisty, not someplace you’d want to be driving at night. Trust me, I did it a couple times and will never do it again!
          For off-roading in Sedona, Pink Jeep’s Broken Arrow Tour is still considered the #1 must-do Sedona activity! Whatever you do, if you’re in a rental car, stick to paved roads. Going off-road in a rented vehicle will void your insurance, and leave you on the hook for any repairs or towing you might need.
          Whatever you decide, be sure to book all hotels and guided tours well in advance of your arrival.
          Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
          Alley 🙂

          1. HI Alley! I’m amazed (and grateful) for the wealth of knowledge in trip planning you have related to these areas – I’ve read not five of your replies and am already modifying my itinerary for our family’s upcoming mid-April AZ trip! We were planning on making day trips from Sedona to the Grand Canyon – but after seeing your comments, it seems like this might not be the best idea, mostly due to running out of daylight and driving conditions. I definitely don’t want to risk that with my 3 children and elderly in laws in the car, so now I’m looking at adding a night or two in Williams, AZ to facilitate the day we’d like to spend at the Canyon. Is the drive from Grand Canyon South Entrace, to Williams dangerous at night (I realize you can’t give a certain answer to this), or rather, is it poorly lit like other roads, or might this be a safer trip at dark? Thanks in advance for any help you can offer! If I’m understanding right, it seems the stretch we want to most avoid traveling in the dark might be that from Flagstaff to Sedona?

          2. Hi April, and thanks for your compliments!
            I’m very glad that you’re rethinking your plans to visit the Grand Canyon as a day trip from Sedona, especially with your kiddos and grandparents in tow.
            Williams is an OK place to base yourself out of. It is ~1 hour due South of Grand Canyon South Rim by car and has an ample selection of reasonably-priced hotels and restaurants. Still, I would advise being wary of driving between the park and Williams after dark. Deer, elk, and other wildlife tend to populate that area, which doesn’t have much in the way of supplemental lighting. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying to avoid driving between the Grand Canyon and Williams after dark at all costs; people do it all the time without incident. But, colliding with a large animal in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, getting cold, where cell service will be spotty (if you can get any bars at all) and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive, can ruin a vacation in a hot second.
            If possible, see if you can find lodging inside the park, or at least in the town of Tusayan, just outside the park gates. Staying at the South Rim will make for a much more relaxed visit for you, and enable you to see sunset and/or sunrise from the best vantage point possible: right on the canyon rim! Grand Canyon lodging
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

  15. Hello Alley Keosheyan:

    You seem very informative and I would like to ask you some questions. Any chance you can e-mail me personally?

    Thanks and I look forward to hearing back from you.

    Best,

    1. Hi Declan,
      If by “sustained,” you mean protected, there are several measures in place for the purpose of protecting and preserving Horseshoe Bend.
      The main measure taken is the recent construction of a parking lot, managed by the City of Page, AZ, which admits visitors between the hours of sunrise and sunset.
      Dogs are allowed as long as they are leashed at all times and their owners pick up after them.
      Overnight camping and the use of drones are strictly prohibited.
      While the majority of the rim is unfenced, there is a small viewing platform that offers a safety rail for those who feel more comfortable with that sort of thing.
      Signage is also in place advising people to bring sufficient water for themselves and all members of their traveling party, to be careful near the rim since it is a 700′ drop, and to wear shoes appropriate for walking in sand.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  16. Alley

    Looking to plan ahead for August of 2021. Assuming operations return to somewhat normal, our family of 9 would include a 1 1/2 year old. I saw the minimum age limit of 4 for the half day Horseshoe Bend tour. Just checking to see if this is more of a “suggestion”. Or a rule ? Boating family and bay is on a boat all the time with his parents who of course will be there with him.

    1. Hi Greg,
      Sorry to have to tell you that the age limit of 4 on the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip is not a guideline, but a strictly enforced rule.
      If a water-based activity is on your “must-do” list — and I don’t blame you if it is! — you’ll need to explore alternatives that are open to pre-K and younger children. The one we recommend is the Antelope Canyon boat tour from Antelope Point Marina.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Dear Noor,
      Due to the brevity of your inquiry, it’s difficult to discern what information you are requesting.
      If a snapshot of currently available tours and attractions is what you wanted to see, here’s what’s open in Page, Arizona:
      Tours & Activities:
      – Horseshoe Bend Overlook
      – Grandview Overlook Park
      – Wahweap Marina
      – Antelope Point Marina
      – The Chains
      – The Hanging Garden Trail
      – Lone Rock Beach
      – Page Rim View Trail
      – The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
      – Wahweap Overlook
      – Glen Canyon Dam Overlook
      – Alstrom Point
      – Skylight Arch
      – White Pocket
      – Wire Pass/Buckskin Gulch
      – Lees Ferry & Lonely Dell Ranch
      – Navajo Bridge & Interpretive Center
      – Glen Canyon Conservancy Flagship Store
      – Kayak Tours on Lake Powell & the Colorado River
      – Private Boat Charters
      – Airplane & Helicopter Tours
      – Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge
      – Jeep/ATV Tours
      – Electric Mountain Bike Tours
      – Big Water Visitors Center (Big Water, Utah)
      – “The Moon” (Big Water, Utah)

      Here’s what’s closed:
      All Navajo Indian Tribal Parks, including:
      – The Antelope Canyons
      – Monument Valley (Goulding’s Lodge open, providing tours with modified routes)
      – Four Corners
      – The Little Colorado River Overlook
      Lake Powell Boat Tours
      Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip
      Glen Canyon Dam Tours
      Carl Hayden Visitors Center
      Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Park Headquarters

      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  17. I am planning to visit Page, Zion and Peekaboo canyons in October but would definitely want to experience the rafting trip.
    Is there any way to book in advance for 1st week of October in case it gets open, don’t want to miss this because of unavailability of tickets at the last moment.

    Thanks

    1. Hi KS,
      Unfortunately, the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip has been cancelled for the remainder of the season according to Wilderness River Adventures.
      At this point, you should be considering alternatives, which would be to drive down to Lees Ferry (~1 hour from Page, AZ) where you can rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle with the gentle current of the Colorado River for 15 miles through Horseshoe Bend and back to Lees Ferry. Prior kayaking experience is not required, and everyone I’ve talked to who has done this said they had a blast! There are several companies offering this type of experience, but the one we’re most familiar with is http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com
      Time permitting, you can make a nice day out of this area by taking a hike to the Lonely Dell Ranch area, walking across the historic Navajo Bridge (keep an eye out for California Condors sunning themselves on the steel arch struts!), and enjoying a meal at Cliff Dweller’s Restaurant, one of the best-kept culinary secrets of Northern Arizona!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hello! My family and I are planning a visit in mid June 2021 and are anxious to book a half-day float trip. In terms of lighting, shadows, etc., what’s the best time to book? Morning, midday, or late afternoon?

        I’m wondering if you might help with two other questions. We are in NC so our trip to AZ is full of uncertainties. Is it possible to hit Monument Valley, do the float, and—if it’s open—Antelope Canyon in a couple of days? And then any guesses on availability of Antelope Canyon by June? I guess all of that is contingent on Covid.

        Thanks in advance!!

        1. Hi Jodi,
          First off, the Antelope Canyons are still closed, and are expected to remain closed at least until Spring of this year. As to what the status will be in June, short answer, we don’t know, so it would be a good idea to start looking at a “Plan B” just in case.
          Fortunately, there are several beautiful slot canyons in the vicinity that are not subject to the closure of the Navajo Indian Reservation, namely, Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch near Paria, UT, and Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Kanab, UT. For more information on these, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ and read “Help! My Tour Got Cancelled
          As for Monument Valley, it’s in the same predicament (closed per Tribal order), but you can see some of the formations just driving through on US163 from Kayenta, AZ, to Mexican Hat, UT. It takes approximately 2 hours, one way, to drive from Page, AZ, to Monument Valley, and what with days being long in June, it can be visited as a day trip, but should the closures remain in place, you must avoid stopping at any Navajo business or interacting with reservation residents. If all that sounds inconvenient, another way you could see Monument Valley would be to fly over it. Fixed-wing airplanes depart from the Page Municipal Airport daily, morning is the best time to fly, and scenic flights last approximately 90 minutes.
          Speaking of morning, that would be the best time to take the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip, if it has resumed running by the time you visit. The main reason for this is because the canyon floor is very hot during the summer months, and morning departures offer cooler temperatures, along with beautiful light and shadow play on the canyon walls. Should the float trip not be running at the time of your visit, a good “plan B” would be to drive to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle the 15-mile stretch of Glen Canyon back to Lees Ferry. If you’ve never kayaked before, don’t worry — first timers do that trip all the time. For more information, visit http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com
          All that said, should things be back to some semblance of normalcy by the time you visit, you could hit Monument Valley, do the float, and tour Antelope Canyon in the course of two days. As mentioned before, one full day should be devoted to visiting Monument Valley, then the float and Antelope Canyon tour would occupy a second day.
          Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year!
          Alley 🙂

  18. Hi,

    Besides Glen Canyon Dam to Lees Ferry tour, do you offer any services from Antelope Point Launch Ramp, AZ 86040 to Antelope Canyon?

    1. Hi Sudeep,
      At the present time, boat tours from Antelope Point Marina are on hiatus due to COVID-19. However, boat rentals and kayak rentals and tours are still being offered. There are several companies offering such services, but we are most familiar with Lake Powell Hidden Canyon Kayak. For more information on how to sign up for a tour, read this piece on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Antelope Canyon Kayak Tours
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Monique,
      I sure wish I knew a little bit more about your trip, namely, where you’re starting out of (Las Vegas? Phoenix? Someplace else?) and whether you wanted to do a white water raft trip (with rapids) or a smooth water raft trip (no rapids). That does make a difference in how I would advise you.
      I assume that whichever the case, one day is all you would have to allot to such a trip. If you are wanting to do a trip with rapids, the only single-day white water rafting trip offered in the vicinity of the Grand Canyon is offered by Hualapai River Runners. Based out of Peach Springs, AZ, this trip is conducted by the Hualapai Indian Tribe at Grand Canyon West, which is approximately 2.5 hours from Las Vegas, NV and/or Grand Canyon South Rim. 1-day white water package tours are available that include round-trip transportation, or you can self-drive there. Since the raft trip starts very early in the morning, and Peach Springs, AZ, is quite remote, you would probably want to spend the night there the night prior, and possibly the night after since the trip can range from 12-14 hours in length depending on how you exit the river. Since social distancing has reduced capacity on boats, don’t be surprised to find these trips are already sold out for your dates of travel.
      Another good option for shorter white water rafting trips is Moab, UT. Trips starting at half day in length and up are offered on the Colorado River through an area known as Cataract Canyon. Like Peach Springs, AZ, Moab, UT, is also quite remote, but a little more “cosmopolitan” in its hotel, restaurant, and tour offerings. Here again, if you choose a Moab, UT, white water raft trip, you should probably plan on staying the night prior to the trip in Moab, and the night after the trip, at the very least. Moab, UT, is also the gateway community for Arches and Canyonlands National Parks, with lots of fun things to see and do, so a minimum stay of 3-4 nights is highly recommended for this area! Things to do in Moab, UT
      If you prefer a smooth water raft trip (no rapids), unfortunately, the most popular trip of this kind (the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip out of Page, AZ) has been placed on hiatus until further notice due to COVID-19. The Black Canyon Adventure out of Boulder City, NV, has also been suspended, but they are aiming to restart after Labor Day. If you have small kids in the party, or those who do not wish to travel through rapids, this might be a good alternative for you. Again, due to social distancing guidelines, capacity will very likely be reduced on their boats and other ancillary vehicles, so make reservations ASAP if this activity interests you.
      If your travels are taking you to Page, AZ, another activity you might consider is driving to Lees Ferry (~1 hour from Page, AZ), renting a kayak, and riding a backhaul boat to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam. You would then paddle the 15 mile stretch of Glen Canyon back to Lees Ferry. Obviously, kayaks are a natural for social distancing. No previous kayaking experience is required, but there may be some age limits to contend with. For more information, visit http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com
      Hope that helps. Please feel free to contact us again if we can provide further guidance to you.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Alley,
        Quick question about the Kayak Horseshoe Bend trip. Is there any current that makes the kayak an easier 15 mile run? How long does it normally take. We have kayaked before, but are questioning our ability to do the 15 mile trip. Is it easy?

        Thanks,
        Phil

        1. Hi Philip!
          Thank you for this great question about the Kayak Horseshoe Bend.
          The flow of the Colorado River is controlled by the Glen Canyon Dam, therefore, the current occurring in the 15-mile stretch between the base of the dam (where you get backhauled to) and Lees Ferry is very gentle. First-time kayakers take this trip every day and enjoy it thoroughly. In fact, recent reviewers on Google rated the trip as “easy and smooth” and “the most beautiful experience of my life!” If you have any questions about the trip, feel free to call Kayak Horseshoe Bend at (928) 355-2211.
          If you take the trip, and have a minute after your vacation, feel free to write in again and tell us how it went!
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  19. Question, for the rafting experience as of July, would it be possible to book with our own group of 6 or is there any other private options to abide current social distancing regulations?

    1. Hello Kesh,
      The Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip has been cancelled until further notice due to COVID-19. In the event it does resume running in July, they don’t offer private tours, but will probably reduce passenger capacity on each raft in order to promote social distancing. What that will actually look/feel like, no one knows yet, unfortunately.
      One possible work-around would be to, shall we say, “reverse engineer” the problem: rent a kayak at Lees Ferry, ride a back-haul boat up to the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle back down the river to Lees Ferry. For more information on these services, visit http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi David,
          Since you posted your inquiry on the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip page, I’ll assume that you’re asking about that tour specifically. Unfortunately, the answer is “no.” It has been suspended until further notice due to COVID-19. A good alternative, however, would be to drive down to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, book what’s known as a “backhaul” service up to the Glen Canyon Dam, and paddle back down to Lees Ferry. Granted this will probably take as long or longer than the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip, but in exchange, you have the freedom to pull over to any beach that strikes your fancy and enjoy a refreshing dip in the Colorado River (it’ll be short – water’s cold) or a leisurely picnic lunch. There are several companies in the area that offer backhaul services, including Wilderness River Adventures, and Kayak Horseshoe Bend.
          If you were actually referring to the Horseshoe Bend Overlook, it is open, in fact, it’s one of a handful of attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed. The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, parking fee is $10/passenger car or RV or $35/light commercial vehicle.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Christy,
          Not sure where you are seeing the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip as being “bookable,” because it is still on suspension until August 31st at the earliest.
          A good alternative would be to go down to Lees Ferry (~ 1 hour from Page, AZ), rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle the 15-miles through Glen Canyon back to Lees Ferry. For more information on this Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip alternative, visit http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  20. I am seeing that you do not have anything available until July for the Horseshoe Bend Tour. Do you hold waitlists for possible cancellations? Super Bummed!

    1. Hi Redd,
      The Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip is on temporary hiatus due to the potential dangers posed by COVID-19. Since social distancing isn’t really practical on a raft, the possibility of exposure to and from other tourists is simply not worth the risk.
      As to whether a wait list is taken, that’s doubtful, but to inquire about it, please call Wilderness River Adventures (the concessionaire) directly at 928-645-2496.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. Me also !! Was planning to come to Arizona June 22
      I don’t even know how long to postpone if they might not open at all the whole summer .. does anybody have any info ?
      Does this mean visiting horse shoe bend by foot is also closed if float trip is closed

      1. Hi Shelly!
        No need to postpone your trip if you don’t want to — Horseshoe Bend is open. It is one of the few attractions in the Page, AZ, area that remained open the entire time throughout the COVID-19 shutdown period. Other nearby attractions on Navajo Tribal Land such as the Antelope Canyons and Monument Valley are closed, but are shooting for a re-open date of mid-June. To be put on an e-mail list to be notified as to when that happens, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
        Glen Canyon/Lake Powell is in the midst of a “phased” reopening of facilities and activities and *fingers crossed* will be back in full swing by the time you visit!
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

          1. Hi Tammi,
            Yes, you read correctly. The Navajo Tribe has been hit especially hard by the COVID-19 virus, so if that’s what they need to do, we’d totally be behind them.
            Fortunately, there are several slot canyons in the local area that are not dependent on the Navajo Reservation reopening. The closest ones are Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch, located off US89 down the House Rock Valley Road between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT; and Peek-a-Boo Canyon aka Red Canyon, near Kanab, UT, down BLM Road #102 off US89. While neither of these technically require a guided tour to visit, we strongly recommend taking one since both access routes are unpaved and visitors in rental cars would void their insurance by driving off-road.
            For Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch Tours, contact one of the following licensed guide services:
            – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
            – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
            For Red/Peek-A-Boo Canyon (BTW, there’s another Peek-A-Boo Canyon located Grand Staircase/Escalante National Monument — this isn’t the one we’re referring to!), contact:
            – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
            – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
            – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
            Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels!
            Alley 🙂

    3. I’m
      Also bummed but I heard it’s not because of sold out it’s because they aren’t planning to open till July 1.. possible sooner possible later
      They won’t know til June 8 so I hear .. if you find out any further info please relay !

  21. Hi. Is there any way to rent a raft or kayak and float at a leisurely pace in horseshoe bend? With covid we would like to be in our own boat without a guide and other tourists. Thanks!

    1. Hi Erika,
      The float trip described on this page is not operating at the moment due to the very reason you cite. A kayak rental might be a good compromise, but you would still need to be backhauled from Lees Ferry to the Glen Canyon Dam by a certified boat pilot.
      For more information on kayak rentals and backhaul services, visit http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com or http://www.KayakTheColorado.com
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  22. Hi and Good Morning( for me)!

    I apologize if this has been asked there are a lot of questions on here. I was at Horseshoe last summer with a tour group and we only spent one hour or so. I have wanted to come back on my own since then. I have not seen if it is possible for people( me) to take my own personal kayak down the river, camp and then hike out of the canyon at another location? Can you tell me where I find information for river access that is not guided, or does all of it need to be with a certified guide?

    Many thanks

    Ryan

    1. Hi Ryan and thank you for this excellent question.
      It is possible to take one’s personal or rented kayak through Horseshoe Bend. You would need to utilize a backhaul service from Lees Ferry to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, and you would simply paddle down from there.
      Wilderness River Adventures, the concessionaire for the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip, offers such a service. For more information, visit http://www.riveradventures.com
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  23. We are in town from Oklahoma…. a lot of places are closed due to Covid 19. Is there still away to see Horseshoe Bend?

    1. Hi Lindsey,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. However, the Antelope Canyons are closed until further notice. In light of that fact, plus considering that there are over 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and many popular nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

  24. Hello, I would love to get married at horseshoe bend. Is that possible? If doi can I please get the info to contact and set up? Thank you so much!
    Katie Raylynn

    1. Hi Katie and thank you for your excellent inquiry!
      Yes, it is possible to get married at Horseshoe Bend. You are required to get a special use permit, plus arrange for an officiant, photographer, catering, etc. If all that sounds like a pain, it can be, which is why we recommend you consider utilizing a local wedding planning service to make all these arrangements for you. We recommend Monumental Arizona Weddings & Events. We know the owners personally and know they’ll make your special day an amazing one! For more information, visit http://www.HorseshoeBendWedding.com
      Good luck, safe travels, and congratulations on your nuptials,
      Alley 🙂

  25. Hello! My fiance and I are eloping in Sedona on 7/20 and we are looking to spend a day visiting Horshoe Bend & Antelope Canyon. Ideally we would like ot hike to to the top of HB and float around it as well and get to go through the canyons. We have absolutely no time restraints and can be gone all day so would like to know if this is doable?
    Thank you so much!

    1. Hi Linda, and congratulations on your upcoming nuptials!
      If you want to do all the things you list, you need to spend the night in Page, AZ.
      First off, the drive from Sedona, AZ, to Page, AZ, is 3 hours each way. The Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip is a half day commitment; trip duration is 4.5 hours, which breaks out as ~3.5 hours on the river, 1 hour in transit. During peak tourist season, there are 3 daily departures, 7:00 am, 10:30 am, and 1:00 pm (check-in required 1 hour prior to departure). In July, I strongly recommend that you take the early morning departure, mainly because afternoons in the canyon get SUPER hot. Besides, mid-day to early afternoon is when you want to be in Antelope Canyon. The interior of the slot canyons tend to stay a constant, comfortably cool temperature! If you opt to visit Upper Antelope Canyon, that is when those beautiful light beams appear. The best time to visit the Horseshoe Bend Overlook during the summer — again, this is for the sake of convenience and comfort — is right at sunrise. In late July, sunrise occurs at about 5:15 AM.
      Long story short, a better plan than trying to do all this stuff in one day would be to do this:
      Day 1 – drive from Sedona to Page, AZ, tour Antelope Canyon in the afternoon, stay overnight in Page
      Day 2 – get up early, hit Horseshoe Bend, then do the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip, then drive back to Sedona
      Whatever you decide, be sure you start the return drive to Sedona so you’re not doing any of it in the dark, especially that drive through Oak Creek Canyon. Most roads up here are very dimly lit, and deer, elk, and other wildlife can congregate on the shoulder of the roads, making nighttime driving especially dangerous in this part of the U.S.
      Hope that helps.
      Good luck, safe travels, and stay well!
      Alley 🙂

  26. Hi, Thank you for posting these questions and answers – very helpful. We are interested in doing the Horseshoe Bend Raft trip. My 77 year old sister is concerned about sitting on a backless seat for an extended period of time. I see there is one stop for the petroglyphs. Is there another stop? Would she be able to stand on the raft to stretch? Would she be able to sit on the floor of the raft and lean against the side? Basically I am asking how long she would have to sit without back support without a break?
    Thank you – stay well.

    1. Hi Maureen,
      Yours is the first inquiry NOT related to COVID-19 that we’ve received in weeks, and it’s a good one!
      First off, you’ll be happy to know that seniors enjoy the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip all the time. Those with concerns about back support do have several options:
      1. Request a seat near the boat pilot; these tend to have more support. You might want to make reservations by phone so you can put in an advance request for this.
      2. Ask the boat pilot if it’s OK to stand and take a stretch; there are multiple opportunities to do this throughout the trip, and as you can see on the tour company’s website, people stand to take photos all the time, usually when the pilot turns off the motor and lets the raft coast.
      3. Bring or purchase a portable folding stadium seat. Amazon has many different models you can order in advance, or simply stop at the Super Wal-Mart in Page, AZ, or elsewhere on your trip and pick one up in the camping section.
      Hope that helps. Good luck, safe travels, and stay well!
      Alley

    1. Dear Mr. Ocean,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice if the situation warrants.
      In light of the fact that there are over 150 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including some fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very limited medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their respective capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

      1. I turned 60 on 4/22.
        I have never seen the Grand Canyon,only in photos. So me,& Larry my Pomeranian Chihuahua medical alert dog. Want to taje the back rosds up to Page. Highways: 60 to 93 to 89. Play tourist in Jerome,& then overnight in the Grand Hotel. Highway 89 to Page. Now the canyon is closed.
        Would it be worth the drive to Page from Phoenix? What would you recommend?

        1. Hi Phillip,
          First of all, happy belated birthday!
          Second of all, you are correct in that the Grand Canyon is closed due to the COVID-19 outbreak.
          However, Horseshoe Bend remains open. As to whether it would be worth it for you make the drive all the way up from Phoenix, consider these facts:
          – The Antelope Canyons, another popular attraction near Page, AZ, are closed until further notice
          – There are over 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona
          – All visitor facilities at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, aka Lake Powell, are closed until further notice (although the park itself technically remains open)
          – Most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities
          If you do decide to visit, we ask that you please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley

  27. Is it too cold to do the float trip in late Oct/early Nov? What time does it begin and end, please? What is the restroom situation?

    1. Hi Elizabeth,
      Under normal circumstances, the Horseshoe Bend Float Trip runs until October 31st. With the disruption caused by the COVID-19 virus, the schedule may be extended, but obviously, that remains to be seen.
      As for whether it’s too cold to comfortably enjoy in late October/early November, if the weather is good, then no. Temperatures on the river tend to be somewhat warmer than they are on the rim, so the air temperature should be pleasant, although a little too cold for swimming. Again, this is providing that the weather that day is good. If it happens to be raining or even snowing, that could change things. Weather patterns tend to remain most stable through mid-October, then winter weather patterns start to assert themselves later in the month.
      The Horseshoe Bend raft trip requires check-in at 10:00 AM, the trip start time is 11:00 AM, and approximate return time is 3:30 PM. You would have access to restrooms before the start of the trip, at Petroglyph Beach, which is midway down the river portion of the trip, once more at Lees Ferry where you pull off the river, then back at the trip headquarters at the conclusion. The longest you would be without access to a restroom is 90 minutes-2 hours at any given point.
      Hope that helps.
      Good luck, safe travels, and wash your hands 😉
      Alley

  28. We are staying at the RV park at the South Rim. What are our travel options to Page for the 1/2 day Horseshoe Bend float trip? I’d rather not have to take the RV to Page. We’ll be there July 1 & 2. There are 7 of us.

    1. Hi Renee,
      I totally get not wanting to unhook your RV at the crack of dawn, spend 5+ hours on the road driving up to Page, AZ, and back, then having to re-do your RV hookup in the dark. Fortunately, there is not one, but two possible solutions to this problem: the Horseshoe Bend Rafting package with round-trip bus transportation from the South Rim, or the Scenic Canyon River Adventure, which includes a scenic sunrise fixed-wing airplane flight from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, a tour of Upper Antelope Canyon (another must-do in the Page, AZ, area!), and the Horseshoe Bend Float Trip. Return transport to the South Rim on the Canyon River Adventure is by bus.
      Since you are traveling around the 4th of July weekend and have such a large party, I would strongly encourage you to make reservations for your Horseshoe Bend Rafting tour ASAP.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Michelle,
      If you are wanting to bring your service dog on the trip referenced on the page you commented on (the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip), then you should contact the tour company directly to make arrangements. The company that operates the Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip is Wilderness River Adventures, their phone # is 800.992.8022.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  29. Ally,
    We are coming in late March and are looking to do an upper and lower antelope canyon tour and a boat tour around horseshoe bend. Is there a combo tour? If not, is there two tours we can book in same day? We will be staying in Page and would really like to use one company for the tours Thank you.

    1. Hi Jody, this is a great question, and unfortunately the answer to whether you can book the tours you desire as a combo is “no.” As to whether you could take them all in a single day, probably not at the time of year you’re visiting.
      The only boat tour that goes through Horseshoe Bend on the Colorado River is the Glen Canyon Half Day Float Trip. In late March, it departs once a day, at 11:00 AM (10:00 AM check-in) and returns at 3:30 PM. You might be able to “bookend” Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon around this tour, but you’d have to get a really early start to your day, and with daylength being relatively short at the time of your trip (sunrise at ~6:15 AM and sunset at roughly 6:45 PM), you might be cutting it a bit too fine to pull it off comfortably. As of right now, the earliest tour of Lower Antelope Canyonn is at 7:30 AM, and takes roughly 2 hours. You would then need to book it over to Wilderness River Adventures to catch the float trip. If for some reason your tour departs late, or gets held up in any way, causing you to be late for the float trip, the tour company will not wait for you, which means you could be out a considerable sum of money. The latest departure of Lower Antelope at that time of year occurs at 4:00 PM, which means you would need to high-tail it from the float trip over to the Tribal Park entrance in order to check in 30 minutes prior to departure, which is required.
      IMO, that’s too much rushing around to pull it off in a day, with too many variables that could throw a kink in your plans. A better idea would be to do the float trip one day, then tour Upper and Lower Antelope on a separate day.
      Hope that helps. Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year!
      Alley 🙂

      1. Alley,
        This helps so so much. I do believe we need two days and that is what we are going for. Do you guys book both types of tours, the upper and lower antelope and the glenn canyon boat tour? Is there a specific website to go through? It is probably on here somewhere but all the info is very overwhelming. Thank you so much for your help. You have no idea how much I needed it.

        1. Hi again, Jody!
          For Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon tours, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ “How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon” and look for the “Upper + Lower Antelope Canyon” tour bundle.
          For the Glen Canyon Float Trip, we haven’t yet managed to bundle that in with the Antelope Canyon tours, but we’re working on it! For now, though, you’ll need to book that tour through the concessionaire. For more information, visit Wilderness River Adventures | Glen Canyon Half Day Float Trip.
          Have fun!
          Alley 🙂

  30. We are interested in traveling from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon to Glen Canyon Dam for a raft trip on the Colorado. Is there any transportation to get us there if we don’t have a car?

    1. Hi Karin,
      There are two tours from Grand Canyon South Rim that go to Page, AZ, for the Glen Canyon Float Trip: the Canyon Smooth Water Bus Tour and the Antelope Canyon With Rafting Tour.
      Both tours are approximately 12 hours in length. The Canyon Smooth Water Bus Tour includes round-trip bus transportation from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ; the Antelope Canyon w/Rafting Tour includes a sunrise fixed-wing airplane flight from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, and return transportation by motorcoach.
      That said, I’m curious as to how you’ll be getting to Grand Canyon South Rim without a car?
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  31. I had booked a lower antelope canyon tour on Oct 7th for 9:15 am (I may be able to change this to 8:45 or as late as 4:15pm). The rafting trip for horseshoe seems to be at 11am. Is this enough time to be able to do both? Do you have another suggestion. There is 2 adults and 2 children ( 12 and 7 yr old.) I would appreciate your expertise in this matter.

    1. Hi Heather!
      I would strongly recommend changing your Antelope Canyon tour to an earlier time slot, or a later one, and not the time slots you’re presently proposing.
      2-2.5 hours should be allowed for touring Lower Antelope Canyon, factoring in advance check-in, and the inevitable “bottleneck” that builds up as the day goes on. Even an 8:45 AM departure will put you in danger of missing the required check-in for the Glen Canyon Float Trip, which, at the time of year you’re visiting, is 10:00 AM. The Glen Canyon Float Trip typically concludes at 3:30 PM in October, so, theoretically, you could make it on time for a 4:15 PM tour of Lower Antelope, but again, that’s only theoretically. While the check-in locations are not too far away from one another, a 4:15 PM Antelope Canyon tour will require you to check in at 3:45 PM. Therefore, you’d have to hope and pray that your trip ends on time, then rush over to the departure point for your Antelope Canyon tour. No time to linger, shop, or bid your raft captain a proper good-bye.
      If availability of Lower Antelope Canyon tours isn’t cooperating with you taking the tour on October 7th, I’d recommend doing the tour the following morning, or perhaps the day prior. Another option would be to consider Antelope Canyon X, which is similar in looks and physicality to Lower Antelope, but group sizes are kept smaller.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  32. we are going to be in Page AZ the week of the 22nd and I can not find phone, email or web page to book the Glen Canyon Float Trip?
    can you help me with info to contact some one?
    thanks.

    1. Hi Joddy,
      Sorry for the troubles you are experiencing.
      Wilderness River Adventures can be reached by phone at (800) 992-8022 or (928) 645-3296. Unfortunately, I was unable to find a suitable e-mail address to use to contact them for reservations.
      Hope that information at least helps.
      Alley 🙂

  33. Hi there,
    We will be there August 7th, traveling w/a 6 yr old. All the upper antelope tours seems to be booked and the only one I found kids need to be 8 years old to tour w/them. What other tours can you suggest? We are driving in from Las Vegas and had planned a day for Page,Az. Flying back home through Phoenix.

    1. Hi Erika,
      Sorry for the troubles.
      At present, only two out of four Upper Antelope Canyon tour companies allow children younger than 7: Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours and Roger Ekis’ Antelope Canyon Tours.
      If you find those companies’ tours sold out, you might look at Antelope Canyon X. It does involve a few stairs and ladders, but they do allow infants and pre-K children on their tours.
      For more information on touring Antelope Canyon with children, check out “FAQ: Bringing Kids To Antelope Canyon
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  34. Hi! We’ll be staying at the Grand Canyon Lodge, North Rim. Do you pick up from there? Thanks!

    1. Hi Karen,
      No, the float trip does not pick up from Grand Canyon North Rim. If you would like to take the Glen Canyon Float Trip, you would need to drive to Page, AZ, which is ~2.5 hours from GC North Rim.

      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  35. hello
    Who are the other merchant who operate river rafting in page/horseshoe? i need late afternoon timing and wilderness river adventure dont have that?
    who are the provider for aeroplane/helicopter in horseshoe bend?
    thanks

    1. Dear Sachin,
      Wilderness River Adventures is the only tour company operating float trips in Glen Canyon. If you’re wanting to do a water-based activity in late afternoon, you might consider a boat tour on Lake Powell. There are two operators of these: Lake Powell Resort and Antelope Point Marina. Another option might be a kayak tour, there are 3 companies that run these: Kayak Lake Powell, Hidden Canyon Kayak, and Lake Powell Paddleboards & Kayaks. Keep in mind that these activities take place on Lake Powell and not in Glen Canyon.
      For airplane tours, operators are: Westwind Air Service, American Aviation, and Scenic/Grand Canyon Airlines. For helicopters, contact Papillon/Grand Canyon Helicopters
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  36. Hello!! I often kayak Up Colorado River 15 miles from down river below the Hoover Dam, and turn around. Is this possible to launch down river from the dam at Lee’s, kayak up river, to turn around and return? Thanks in advance!

    Jenny

    1. Hi Jenny,
      Yes, you can do something like that in Glen Canyon! You would need to employ a backhaul service to port your kayak to the base of Glen Canyon Dam, and you could then kayak down to Lees Ferry. Backhaul services are offered by Wilderness River Adventures.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. So it is not possible to paddle up river? Is there a good phone number to call and ask very specific questions? I am traveling from Mammoth Lakes and it is about an 11 hour drive. I need to make sure all of my ducks are in a row! Lee’s Ferry ain’t answer phones:(

        Thank you for your quick response!!!! 🙂

        1. Hi Jenny,
          I believe you have to get backhauled up to the dam, but for specific information, call Wilderness River Adventures at (928) 645-3296.
          Best regards,
          Alley

    1. Hello Lee,
      This particular video does not belong to our company, it was shot by Colorado River Discovery, the former concessionaire for the Glen Canyon Float Trip. The concession contract for the Glen Canyon Float Trip was recently re-awarded to Wilderness River Adventures, so you would probably want to coordinate with them to use any video footage of the float trip so you can relay the most accurate information to your viewers. For more information, visit https://www.riveradventures.com/glen-canyon-float-trips/glen-canyon-float-trip-experience/ Their local phone number is 928-645-3296.
      Best of luck to you,
      Alley 🙂

  37. Due to stay at lake Powell 1st and 2nd November this year
    Is there trips still available in Colorado river this time of year?

  38. Hi, I’m Muriel from France, we would like to rent a kayak, canoe or stand up paddle and paddle through Horseshoe Canyon from Glen Canyon dam to Lee’s Ferry. Is that possible ?

  39. I have a query regarding the “half day glen canyon float tour” and “canyon adventure boat tour (2.5 hours)”. I have already booked the glen canyon float trip and was wondering if it makes sense to do “canyon adventures boat tour” as well. Any recommendations on how different they are and if it makes sense to do both.

    1. Hi Rajat and thank you for your excellent question!
      The Half Day Glen Canyon Float Trip traverses a stretch of the Colorado River that lies downstream from the Glen Canyon Dam. You will see canyon walls rise on both sides of you as you make your way down to historic Lees Ferry, the terminus.
      On the Canyon Adventure Boat Tour, you will see part of Lake Powell. This area lies upstream of the Glen Canyon Dam, which impounded the waters of the Colorado River behind it to form a large reservoir. You will see high rock formations, but they will be more spread out on the lake.
      Doing both activities certainly wouldn’t be a bad use of your time, but 1. I wouldn’t recommend doing them on the same day and 2. before you commit to doing both, I would prioritize the Glen Canyon Float Trip first as it’s one of the “Big 3” must-do’s in the Page, AZ area and 3. speaking of the “Big Three,” make sure you’ve set aside enough time to visit the Horseshoe Bend Overlook and for an Antelope Canyon tour. The latter, as well as the Glen Canyon Float Trip, must be booked in advance.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  40. Hi Alley
    Is there a company that offers both the float trip and secret canyon as one tour? If not, is it possible to fit both tours in one day?
    Kind regards Tasha

    1. Hi Tasha,
      These two attractions are not offered together as a package tour, but they can certainly be seen in one day’s time.
      Assuming you’re traveling during peak visitation period (late Spring through early Fall), you should take the 7:00 AM morning departure of the float trip, which will conclude at about 1:00 PM. You could then tour Secret, or any of the other slot canyons in the Page, AZ area, in the afternoon.
      Advance reservations should be made for both activities.
      Thank you for visiting our site!
      Alley 🙂

  41. we are doing the full day float trip on the 3rd week of may. do we wear swim suits? are we able to just jump in?

    1. Hi Julie,
      You are welcome to wear swimsuits on the Glen Canyon Float Trip, but any swimming you do will be brief: the water in the Colorado River is a constant, cold 45 degrees (Fahrenheit). Wear whatever you’re comfortable with, preferably light layers you can easily shed and stash in a bag, and put on again if the need arises. The best opportunity to enjoy a quick dip will occur at lunchtime, or when you pull over to Petroglyph Beach to take an easy walk to see a panel of ancient pictographs.
      Have fun!
      Alley 🙂

  42. Hi there
    I am coming from Australia on August 29th and would like to book the float tour to Horseshoe bend down the two-mile long Glen Canyon Dam access tunnel for 9 adults but cannot find anywhere to contact or do a booking. Please advise company/website for this.

    1. Hi Jill,
      Sorry for the troubles, the concession contract transitioned to another company this year and bugs are still being sorted out! The Glen Canyon Float Trip is now run by Wilderness River Adventures, the website to use to book is https://www.riveradventures.com/glen-canyon-float-trips/glen-canyon-float-trip-experience/
      Best wishes for safe travels!
      Alley 🙂
      P.S. We would strongly recommend taking the morning departure that time of year as daytime high temperatures on the river are very hot, plus afternoons run the risk of monsoon storms, which are sometimes severe enough to warrant cancellation of the trip.

  43. Hi Alley!
    Thanks for your information and kind responses! It has been very useful when planning our trip.
    I’m travelling in may with my wife, a 2.5 year old child and a 9 month baby.
    Do you think a boat trip (a short one) is suitable and available for us?

    For the instance, we are including (one day each): Bryce NP, Upper Antelope Canyon & Horseshoe Bend, and travelling around the Grand Canyon. We will be renting an RV from Las Vegas. Any additional suggestion about adding/removing something?
    Thanks!!

    1. Hi again, Diego!
      With children that young, you will be limited on your options, such as the Glen Canyon Float Trip. Children have to be at least 4 to take part in that. Guess you’ll have to make plans to come back 😉
      The shortest boat tour would be an Antelope Canyon waterside tour from Antelope Point Marina. They last about 1 hour. Do read the information carefully before committing, though.
      Another observation: since you’re coming from Las Vegas, you might consider working Zion National Park into your trip. Since the roads through the park are quite steep, what you might do is drive as far as Springdale, take the shuttles into the park for sightseeing, then continue on to Page. Also, be sure to make reservations for all the RV parks and campgrounds you plan to stay at on your trip.
      Best wishes for safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  44. Hi
    We are a family of 4 planning a boat tour from Page on 9th July 2018. Can you inform about duration, start time, price and availability ?
    Regards
    Torben (Denmark)

    1. Hi Torben and thank you for your inquiry.
      Lake Powell Boat Tours vary in length from approximately 90 minutes to 6+ hours. Which one you take depends on what you want to accomplish, sights you want to see, etc. For example, if you wish to see Rainbow Bridge National Monument, you’ll want to take the Rainbow Bridge Boat Tour from Lake Powell Resort, which is on the longer end of the time variance. Depending on the level of Lake Powell – which is forecasted to be on the low side this year – it could involve a 3-mile round-trip walk to see the Bridge itself. In July, that could be quite uncomfortable due to extreme heat.
      If you’re just wanting a taste of what Lake Powell looks like from the water, you might choose a shorter tour like the Canyon Adventure boat tour or the Canyon Princess Dinner Cruise.
      Whichever one you choose to do, be sure to make reservations in advance of your arrival. Keep in mind that Lake Powell Resort is located within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so an entrance fee is charged to drive to the Resort.
      Hope that helps. Have a wonderful visit!
      Alley 🙂

  45. Hello
    We are a family from Portugal, and we go in vacation next August to USA.

    Is possible make the booking to the 26 August to the full motor trip??

    What the price to 2 adults and my daughter (16 years old).

    Please send me a mail with all the informations because I tried to make the booking in the web site but don’t work.

    Waiting for news

    Best regards

    Carlos Pereira

    1. Hi Carlos,
      So sorry for the trouble! The concession contract for the Colorado River Float Trip was recently awarded to another company and apparently they haven’t updated their booking information yet. I will contact you personally when I find out when they have.
      Apologies again,
      Alley

  46. We have our own kayaks and want to paddle through Horseshoe Canyon from Glen Canyon dam to Lee’s Ferry. Can we provide our own transportation for this or do we have to use a commercial service. We want to leave one vehicle at the dam and the other at Lee’s Ferry to put in and take out. Is this possible? I have the National Parks Lifetime Park Pass.

    1. Hi Sharon, thank you for visiting, and for your question!
      Private vehicles may not be parked at Glen Canyon Dam for security reasons, but they can be parked at Lees Ferry. You would then need to use an authorized backhauling service to get your kayak to the base of the dam so you could paddle down through Horseshoe Bend, etc. Colorado River Discovery in Page, AZ provides this service. For more information, visit https://www.raftthecanyon.com/raft-the-river/back-hauling-services/ Your lifetime park pass would then grant you access to the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, of which Horseshoe Bend is a part. If you wish to camp on the river, the maximum stay length is 14 days.
      Thanks again for visiting and have a wonderful trip!
      Alley 🙂

  47. Hi, Are there any float trips available for the elderly that use a walker? We are bringing my 82y mother and know she would love the trip but pretty sure she can’t sit on the floor or rim of a raft. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    1. Hi Becky,
      Seniors enjoy the Colorado River Discovery float trip every day, including those that use a walker or cane. If your mom requires extra back support, you may wish to bring a folding stadium seat with you. Another option would be to call Colorado River Discovery directly and let them know your concerns. They may be able to pre-assign her a seat based on her need for additional back support. Their phone number is 928-645-9175.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

  48. We are interested in the 1/2 day float trip from Page, AZ at 7:30 am in June. Where do you pick up from? We are also considering doing an Antelope Canyon tour — don’t know whether we could fit that in on the same day. I see you have a slot canyon and raft tour. Is the pick up for that in Page as well? Do you recommend the slot canyon over antelope canyon or should we try to do both (are they different enough?)
    Thanks!

    1. Hi Karen!
      The Colorado River Discovery Half-Day Float Trip picks up at the tour company’s welcome center at 130 6th Avenue in Page. It would conclude at the same place at approximately 12:00 Noon, so you could fit an Antelope Canyon tour in the same day.
      However, due to the almost overwhelming demand for Antelope Canyon Tours this year (What To Do If Antelope Canyon Tours Are Sold Out), the CRD Raft/Slot Canyon Combination tour definitely warrants consideration. The slot canyon in this case is Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon, aka Secret Canyon, which is said to “rival Antelope Canyon for nicely lit, swirling formations” and best of all, has fewer people to jockey with for the perfect photo op! The combination tour from CRD includes lunch, and pick-up/drop-off for both tour components is at the CRD Welcome Center.
      Hope that helps. Have a great trip!
      Alley

    1. Hi Kristin, great question!
      If you’d like to kayak through Horseshoe Bend, you will need to hire a backhaul service from Lees Ferry through Colorado River Discovery. You can then paddle the river self-guided to Lees Ferry through Horseshoe Bend! For more information click here ->: Kayak Backhauling Service
      Hope that helps.
      Have a great trip!
      Alley

    1. Hi Pam,
      As someone who’s rafted the Grand Canyon, I can tell you that IS a lot of fun to do! For what it’s worth, I recommend taking a full-canyon trip from Lees Ferry to at least Whitmore Wash. This will require a minimum time commitment of 7-8 days for a motor trip, 9-10 days for an oar trip. Grand Canyon White Water Rafting trips are offered May through September, and with such a limited season (plus a limited number of spaces on each trip), they do book up months, sometimes up to a year in advance. There are approximately 15 concessionaires that offer Grand Canyon White Water tours, all are good companies licensed by the Park Service with excellent safety and service records. Which one you choose to go with won’t depend so much on who they are, but which one has the trip offering that best fits your schedule. To help you narrow down the search faster, I recommend working with Rivers & Oceans out of Flagstaff, AZ. They work with all the white water concessionaires and are experienced river guides themselves. To contact them, visit http://www.riversandoceans.com
      Happy rafting!
      Alley

    1. Hi Dawn – the answer to your question depends heavily on the time of year you’re visiting. If, for example, your trip is taking place in May or September, the weather is still mild enough to where the 11 AM tour would do just fine for you. However, if you’re traveling during June, July or August, temperatures in Glen Canyon exceed the 100 degree (Fahrenheit) mark, which makes the afternoon trips VERY hot. Hence, the 7:30 AM departure is recommended for summertime visitors.
      Hope that helps – have fun!

  49. Can you go on a one day flot trip through Horseshoe Bend, my wife and I both whitewater kayak and SUP. What is the class, mileage and cost please?! Thank you very much and have a great day!
    Chris Oatman

    1. Hi Chris, this is an excellent question!
      You can indeed go on a one-day float trip through Horseshoe Bend in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. This section of the Colorado River has no rapids, so whitewater rafting experience is not necessary. For trip cost and more information, visit this link ->: https://horseshoebend.com/see-the-canyon-from-the-river-colorado-river-discovery/
      By the way, if you’d like to do some SUP, Lake Powell offers excellent opportunities for doing so! Click here for more information ->: https://lakepowellpaddleboards.com/
      Hope that helps – have a great time!
      Alley

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