The Intimate Grand Canyon Experience

In the fable of The Tortoise and the Hare, Aesop cautioned us to temper our “need for speed,” because “slow and steady wins the race.” In the case of the Horseshoe Bend Overlook, slow and steady doesn’t necessarily win any race, but taking a gradual, more mindful approach to this now-iconic symbol of the American Southwest will give the viewer a better appreciation for the true complexity of the area’s geology. And that, in our book, is definitely one for the “win” column!

As you exit your vehicle in the newly-expanded Horseshoe Bend parking area just South of Page, Arizona, your first challenge is to make your way up a mildly steep incline through deep, sometimes unwieldy sand. Though most visitors succumb to the temptation to make quick work out of this small obstacle, you might view it as an opportunity to take a trip through a real-life “Jurassic World.”

About 200 million years ago, a massive sea of sand dunes covered the landscape from Arizona to Wyoming. Known to geologists as “ergs,” they eventually became petrified (turned to stone) by water and minerals, solidifying into a uniform layer of sandstone over 2,000’ thick in some areas. After the bedrock of Navajo Sandstone formed, other sedimentary layers of sandstone, mudstone, calcite and limestone settled on top of it, then began to wear away under the constant scouring of relentless winds, flash floods, and extreme heat and cold. Today, the Navajo sandstone is once again exposed, and its top layer turning to sand. So this hill that makes you go “erg” is what remains of a gigantic sand dune that actually saw dinosaurs walk upon it. Indeed, there is a small, but hard-to-find dinosaur track about 50 yards from the end of the trail. Tell us the GPS coordinates if you happen to find it!

As you crest the hill, the trail begins to undulate and you’ll notice the tone of the landscape has taken on more jagged, sloping characteristics. Whitish gravel and chunks of sand also make an appearance. These are remnants of the calcite, or limestone layer that was once here. The diagonal stripes in the rock formations tell the story of how the sand dunes were petrified, yet retained their former shape as minerals, rain and snow changed their molecular composition over the course of 20 million years.

As you get closer to Horseshoe Bend Overlook, you’ll notice that some of the rock formations sport dark, sandy nodules. These are known as “iron concretions.” Because it was heavier than sandstone, iron tended to cluster up into small spheres during the process of petrification. As the sandstone erodes away, these concretions are becoming exposed to the elements once again. Occasionally, they will break away from the sandstone bedrock. When they do, they become what are known as “Moki Marbles.” If you find one – or more – please don’t pocket them. Remember, take only pictures and leave only footprints!

If all this sounds pretty amazing so far, wait until you see what’s ahead of you: the very thing you came here for – Horseshoe Bend! A geologic masterpiece sculpted by the Colorado River, Horseshoe Bend is an example of what happens when water takes the path of least resistance. Approximately 5 million years ago – or what a geologist might describe as “just the other day” – the Colorado Plateau abruptly uplifted. The rivers that flowed across this ancient landscape were suddenly trapped in their beds. Seeking a new natural level, with the help of gravity, the Colorado River began cutting through rock layers deep and fast. Here at Horseshoe Bend, an unstoppable force met an immovable object, namely, a sandstone escarpment. Since this rock formation wasn’t going to budge anytime soon, the river did the most logical thing it could: it went around it. The result is the 270° bend in the river (called an “incised” or “entrenched meander”) you see before you. Who knows, in a few million years, the stubborn promontory might finally decide to give way to the river’s whims, and future tourists could be viewing an attraction that bears a resemblance to Rainbow Bridge!

At this viewpoint, you can see the waters of the Colorado River in all their sparkling, blue-green glory as they drift along toward the Grand Canyon."

But, that’s in the realm of sheer speculation for now. What’s in the realm of absolute certainty is that this is one of the most intimate views of the Colorado River you’re likely to experience on your Northern Arizona vacation. At this viewpoint, you can see the waters of the Colorado River in all their sparkling, blue-green glory as they drift along toward the Grand Canyon. Where else can you take a selfie with this timeless, majestic waterway in the background? Certainly not at the Grand Canyon – from the South Rim, there is only a handful of viewpoints that the Colorado River can be seen from, and then only a small stretch before it disappears again behind a butte or plateau. So pause for a few minutes to breathe in the fresh air and appreciate this magnificent view for how powerful and miraculous it truly is!

Now, wasn’t it worth the walk? For best results photographing Horseshoe Bend, you’ll need a wide angle lens to get the entire scene in the picture. If heights freak you out a little, try sitting or even lying down to take in the view from a more secure perspective. Seeing little blue dots on the river? Don’t worry, that’s not the altitude messing with your mind, those are rafts rounding Horseshoe Bend on the Half-Day Glen Canyon Float Trip. If you take one look at that first hill and still say “no way,” consider flying over Horseshoe Bend to get an incredible bird’s eye view without breaking a sweat.

299 Responses

  1. Hello! I am visiting Arizona the first week of November for the first time. I am flying into Phoenix and will be taking roughly a 5 day vacation. I am hoping to stop by scottsdale, Sedona (cathedral rock, devils bridge, bell rock) Grand Canyon and page (horseshoe bend, antelope canyon, kayak or boat lake powell, the wave)!! Any recommendations on how I should plan all of these different locations? or suggestions if something is closed due to Covid 19. I was thinking about driving straight to Page when I land in Phoenix and then traveling my way back.. what do you suggest? thank you so much for your help. This page has been so helpful

    1. Hi Brittany,
      Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but your plans are overly ambitious.
      Let’s start with The Wave: it’s highly unlikely you’re going to be able to include it in your itinerary. The Wave is one of the most coveted hikes in the American Southwest. Since it is in such a unique and potentially fragile area, only 20 people per day are allowed to hike in, and must do so by obtaining a permit. 10 permits are given out by advance online lottery 4 months in advance (so, November permits were given out in July), then another 10 by walk-in lottery the day prior to when you wish to hike. Since early November is prime time for hiking The Wave, competition for the remaining 10 walk-in permits is going to be fierce, and besides, you just don’t have time to work it in. Long story short, take The Wave off the table. For more information about getting there in the future, read this piece on our companion site, AntelopeCanyon.AZ: How To Get A Wave Permit
      Next up: the Antelope Canyons. Due to COVID-19, they are closed until further notice. Whether they will open in November remains to be seen, but hopes are not running very high for that right now. You can be placed on a priority e-mail list to be notified when/if they do, again, on our AntelopeCanyon.AZ site. Should the closure remain in effect at the time of your visit, a good alternative would be Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT. Kanab, UT, is ~1 hour drive from Page, AZ, and Red Canyon is a beautiful, user-friendly slot canyon. The only hard part about getting there is the access road in, which a lot of people get stuck on, therefore, a guided tour is strongly recommended. Reputable tour companies who can get you to Peek-A-Boo are:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      Let’s talk about Lake Powell — sorry to be a “Debbie Downer” again, but November is not the best time to do any water-based activities due to the fact that it’s starting to get really cold. Many kayak tour/rental outfitters close up for the season in October. Boat tours are also on hiatus until further notice due to COVID-19. If you’re wanting to enjoy Lake Powell, probably best to plan on doing it from the shoreline. Fortunately, there are ample opportunities for this type of exploration, including The Chains, Wahweap Swim Beach , and Lone Rock Beach.
      Hope it doesn’t sound as though Northern Arizona will be rolling up the sidewalks at the time of your visit; that’s far from the case! That said, I’d recommend planning for 2 nights in Sedona, 1 night at Grand Canyon South Rim, and 2 nights in Page, AZ. How you position these in relation to when you land or fly out of Phoenix will largely depend upon hotel availability. Since Grand Canyon South Rim and Page are both ~5 hours from Phoenix, you might look at hitting Page, AZ, first to visit Horseshoe Bend and maybe tour Peek-A-Boo, then move on to Grand Canyon South Rim.
      Now, normally, the drive from Page, AZ, to GC South Rim takes ~3 hours; due to COVID-19, the Navajo Nation has opted to close an integral portion of the shortest travel route between the two places, necessitating a detour through Flagstaff, then traveling back North again via US180. This has essentially turned a 3-hour drive into more of a 5-hour drive. Overnight at the Grand Canyon, then conclude your trip with a couple days of chill time in Sedona, AZ, ~3 hours from Grand Canyon South Rim. Your drive back to Phoenix would then be ~2.5 hours. Map
      One last suggestion: if you can possibly free up another night or two so you can spend more time in Sedona, you won’t regret doing so. A lot of people report staying 4-5 days in Sedona and only feeling as though they’d “scratched the surface.” There’s a lot to see and do there!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  2. Hi, I’m thinking of bringing a friend to Horseshoe Bend when she visits next month. Are dogs allowed in the park and on the trail?

    1. Hi Brittney,
      Yes, dogs are allowed at Horseshoe Bend as long as they are on a leash and the owner picks up after them. Be sure to bring enough water, not only for your “human” hiking party, but for your dog as well.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  3. Hi–

    Myself and a group of about ~10 others are looking to hike the Grand Canyon (is the South rim entrance open now?), Lake Powell (potentially Horseshoe Bend as well in the same day), and Sedona. Would we need to prepare to purchase any permits prior to making this endeavor/would all of these locations be open for us to hike and explore? Any insight here would be helpful, thank you! This page is great.

    1. Hi Eric and thanks for your compliments!
      Grand Canyon South Rim is open, with some limitations on services due to COVID-19.
      You do not need to purchase or reserve any kind of permit for the trip you were planning to take, unless you were wanting to camp below the rim of the Grand Canyon, in which case, you’d need to reserve a backcountry permit. These are reserved several months in advance, however, so if you don’t have one already, you’ll be limited to day hiking, which can be just as fulfilling as an overnight Grand Canyon hike! Check out this list of popular Grand Canyon day hikes
      The biggest problem I’m seeing here is your plan to hike in the Grand Canyon and visit Horseshoe Bend in the same day. Even under ideal circumstances, this is neither practical nor desirable. Under normal circumstances, the drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Horseshoe Bend takes ~3 hours. Unfortunately, an integral component of the normal travel route is on Navajo Indian Reservation land, and the tribe has opted to close it due to COVID-19. This means that you’re going to have to drive from Grand Canyon South Rim back to Flagstaff, AZ, then continue up US89 North to Page, AZ, and Horseshoe Bend. This effectively turns a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive. Trust me, that’s not something you’ll want to deal with after a potentially rigorous hike in the Grand Canyon! You really need to plan for an extra day and overnight stay in Page, AZ, to comfortably include Horseshoe Bend in your trip plans.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Alley–

        Thank you for the insight! We were planning on doing a day-trip to the Grand Canyon so that works out nicely. Sounds like we may opt to stay in Lake Powell for the day then rather than make the hike to Horseshoe Bend thereafter! Are there any specific sites or activities within the Lake Powell area that you would recommend checking out? Thank you again!

        Best,
        Eric

        1. Hi again, Eric!
          I think you’ve made a good call to stay overnight in Page, AZ. Contrary to what you might have heard, you’ll find no shortage of things to see and do. Unfortunately, the Antelope Canyons are closed, but you won’t have any problem occupying your time. Attractions and activities that remain open and accessible right now include:
          – Grandview Overlook Park
          – Wahweap Marina
          – Antelope Point Marina
          – The Chains & Hanging Garden Trail
          – Lone Rock Beach
          – Page Rim View Trail
          – The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
          – Wahweap Overlook
          – Glen Canyon Dam Overlook
          – Alstrom Point
          – Skylight Arch
          – White Pocket
          – Wire Pass/Buckskin Gulch
          – Lees Ferry & Lonely Dell Ranch
          – Navajo Bridge & Interpretive Center
          – Glen Canyon Conservancy Flagship Store
          – Kayak Tours on Lake Powell & the Colorado River
          – Private Boat Charters
          – Airplane & Helicopter Tours
          – Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge
          – Jeep/ATV Tours
          – Electric Mountain Bike Tours
          – Big Water Visitors Center (Big Water, Utah)
          – “The Moon” (Big Water, Utah)
          – Gunfighter Canyon Indoor Shooting Range
          For more suggestions on how to make the most of a day in Page, AZ, visit “24 Hours in Page, Arizona
          Hope you have a wonderful time! If you get a minute when you get home, drop us a line and let us know how it went 🙂
          Alley

          1. I see that you have recommended White Pocket. Are you aware of any companies that rent high clearance 4×4 vehicles? Thanks

          2. Hi John!
            This is a great question — there are indeed several companies that rent high clearance jeeps and other 4×4 vehicles that could get you to White Pocket.
            They include, but aren’t necessarily limited to:
            – Powell Adventure Rentals, http://www.powelladventurerentals.com, 928-645-0208
            – Carl’s Marine & Jeep Rentals, http://www.carlsadventurerentals.com, 928-660-0548
            – Lake Powell Jeep Rentals, http://www.lakepowelljeeprentals.com, 928-660-1395
            – Lake Powell Vacations, http://www.lakepowellvacations.com, (928) 614-8573
            Before you commit to a self-guided tour to White Pocket, I must warn you that the access route to get there should only be attempted by those with previous 4×4 experience. Even individuals who regularly drive off-road have gotten stuck out there, requiring a VERY expensive towing bill. If you have never driven a jeep in deep sand, rutted roads, or over rocky terrain, I’d skip the rental and go with a guided tour. These companies have experienced drivers and vehicles with beefy enough suspensions to handle the terrain! Authorized tour companies for this area are:
            – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
            – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
            – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
            – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
            – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
            – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
            Good luck and safe travels!
            Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Richard,
      If you are referring to Horseshoe Bend, yes, it is one of a few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed. Glen Canyon National Recreation (Lake Powell) is also open, albeit with some facilities closed. The most significant component of most peoples’ Page, AZ, vacations that remains up in the air are the Antelope Canyons. They are currently closed due to COVID-19. When they will reopen is uncertain, but you can get on a priority e-mail list to be notified when the closure is lifted. AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Closure Alert E-mail List
      One thing to bear in mind, whatever you decide to do, is that December is winter, therefore, it will be cold in most places you go. It’s rare for the Page, AZ, area to see enough snow to warrant closing Horseshoe Bend, but you’ll at least need to pack jackets, gloves, etc.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. Hi There! I’ve been wanting to plan a tip to Arizona to explore the national parks and sites for a long time. I heard that most places you need to apply for a permit? Like Antelope Canyon and Havasu Falls. Does Horseshoe Bend need one too? Can you let me know all the places that require a permit or reservation? And provide me with a link to the site to do so? Thank you so much for any information 🙂
      -Julie

      1. Hi Julie!
        Contrary to what you might have heard, only a few “Arizona Bucket List” places actually require a permit to visit.
        Havasu Falls is one of them. Unfortunately, that area is closed indefinitely due to COVID-19. When they do reopen, you’ll want to bookmark http://www.HavasupaiReservations.com to apply for a camping permit.
        The Antelope Canyons are also closed until further notice due to COVID-19 unfortunately 🙁 Visiting that area doesn’t require a permit, per se, you just have to go with a guided tour. When/if the Antelope Canyons reopen, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon Should they remain closed at the time of your visit, our companion site also has guidance on how to deal with that situation: “Help! My Tour Got Cancelled
        As for other permit-required sites, The Wave is perhaps the most highly coveted one of all! Due to the unique nature of the terrain, and the fragility of the rock formations, only 20 people per day are allowed to visit this area, which is part of the Coyote Buttes Special Management Area of the Vermilion Cliffs/Paria Canyon Wilderness Area. 10 permits per day are distributed via an online lottery, which must be applied for 4 months in advance. The other 10 permits are given out in a walk-in lottery held in Kanab, UT, the day prior to when you wish to hike. For more information on Wave permits, visit our other companion site, http://www.TheWaveAZ.com
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

  4. I would definitely NOT recommend this as being “wheelchair accessible” despite what is claimed. I took my wife there today who is in a wheelchair. The walkway to the Horseshoe is NOT smooth. The path is full of rocks and sand and is very uneven. We nearly broke the wheels on the wheelchair several times due to the rocks, holes and sand on the trail. I nearly dumped my poor wife numerous times! The hill is also quite steep both on the way TO the Horseshoe and on the way back to the parking lot. I don’t think I would have made it were it not for another man helping me. I’m in decent shape, so it’s not that I am so weak that I could not make the hills. Anyhow, I hope they improve this for wheelchair access. The view was spectacular, but we barely made it back!

    1. Dear David,
      I am terribly sorry that you found the trail to Horseshoe Bend less than accommodating for your wife’s wheelchair!
      Since the City of Page, AZ, is in charge of maintaining the trail and parking lot (and touting the trail as being ADA compliant), I would strongly recommend that you share these observations with someone there. The Economic Development/Tourism department would probably be a good place to start. They can be reached by phone at (928) 645-4310.
      Despite how things went this time around, I hope you get a chance to return to the area someday, perhaps at a time when the trail to Horseshoe Bend has been fully paved.
      Take care and have a good rest of your summer,
      Alley 🙂

      1. My husband and I are planning a trip to the area in late January/early February and thought we’d like to take a look at Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon (if it’s opened at that time). We’re hikers (having previously traversed down to Phantom Ranch) and I’m wondering how long (in time and distance( the hike is at Horseshoe Bend) and if it is just around the rim or if you actually descend into the canyon-and if so, how far. Also, how cold is this area in mid-winter?

        1. Hi Debbie!
          If you’ve been to Phantom Ranch, Horseshoe Bend will be a cakewalk. The out-and-back trail is only .7 miles in length (one way), is mostly flat, and extends from the parking lot to the canyon rim. No part of the trail actually goes down into the canyon itself.
          As for what Page, AZ, is like in mid-winter, you’ll encounter days that are sunny but brisk mostly, but we do get the occasional wind or snowstorm passing through. Bring a jacket and gloves in any case.
          As for the Antelope Canyons, we are crossing fingers and toes that they’ll be reopened by the time you get here. If they aren’t, you might want to start looking at some alternate activities. If touring a slot canyon is on your wish list, you’d probably enjoy Wire Pass Canyon. This photogenic two-part slot canyon is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which may require traversing deep sand if recent weather has been dry. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
          – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
          – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
          – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
          To be placed on a priority e-mail list notifying people when/if the Antelope Canyons do open, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Closure Alert
          Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  5. Hi! My family and I are planning to visit Horseshoe Bend and, on your recommendation in some of the comments, Peek A Boo Canyon, since Antelope Valley is still closed. Could you recommend other sights to see appropriate for a 7 year old in between those 2 locations? Also, where would you say would be the best location to stay that is most accessible to all the sights? We’re planning to stay end of Sept for about 3 nights (9/25-9/28). Thank you for all your help!

    1. Hi Nina,
      This is a great question! For optimal convenience visiting Horseshoe Bend and Peek-A-Boo Canyon, the best place to look for hotels would be Page, AZ, or Kanab, UT. As for sights in between the two towns that would appeal to a 7-year-old, you’ll have no shortage of fun! ~15 minutes from Page, AZ, on US89, you’ll find the town of Big Water, UT, which has a wonderful visitors center featuring paleontology displays and dinosaur bones excavated locally. Almost smack dead center between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, at mile marker 19 on the Utah side of US89, is the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstools Hoodoos Trail. This hike, rated easy to moderate, offers up cool rock formations and classic desert scenery. If you’re wanting to take a swim, The Chains area on the Eastern flank of the Glen Canyon Dam is a good area, although it’s a bit of a hike to get back up to the parking lot from the water line. If that doesn’t appeal, Lone Rock Beach on the Arizona/Utah border is nice, just don’t drive your vehicle too far onto the sand — believe me, you don’t want to get stuck there! Another cool hike near the Glen Canyon Dam is the “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock. It’s a relatively short, easy trail that leads to a small but interesting cluster of rock formations. It also happens to be near a small campground, so be sure you don’t impede on anyone’s privacy (or sleep!) while exploring this area. Also, watch how far you drive in so you don’t get stuck in the sand.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hey Courtney!
          The trail to Horseshoe Bend is now more accommodating for those with wheelchairs and strollers, but a testimonial from a recent visitor indicates that it’s not all smooth sailing. He reports:

          I would definitely NOT recommend this as being “wheelchair accessible” despite what is claimed. I took my wife there today who is in a wheelchair. The walkway to the Horseshoe is NOT smooth. The path is full of rocks and sand and is very uneven. We nearly broke the wheels on the wheelchair several times due to the rocks, holes and sand on the trail. I nearly dumped my poor wife numerous times! The hill is also quite steep both on the way TO the Horseshoe and on the way back to the parking lot. I don’t think I would have made it were it not for another man helping me. I’m in decent shape, so it’s not that I am so weak that I could not make the hills. Anyhow, I hope they improve this for wheelchair access. The view was spectacular, but we barely made it back!

          So, feel free to bring your stroller, but be very aware of the terrain you’re on, and be prepared to carry your kiddo, or have him/her walk part of the way. If you get a minute after your visit, report back and let us know how things went for you!
          Alley 🙂

  6. Hi,

    We are super excited to visit horseshoe bend, lower antelope, grand staircase, and Vermilion Cliff in the end of September.
    We will be heading that way from Arches national park, can you please provide the address that we can put on the GPS?
    Which parking lot can we park? And with the whole pandemic, its there anything we should be prepare for? Its all the park are open now?
    We are hoping to do stand up paddle board or kayaking if that is open.

    Looking forward to your suggestion.
    Thank you

    1. Hi Sasikarn,
      The GPS coordinates for Horseshoe Bend are 36.8792° N, 111.5104° W, but frankly, you don’t need these to find it. The overlook is very clearly signed and easy to find, on US89 about 5 miles South of Page, AZ. The parking lot is also very large and easily found. The parking fee is $10 per vehicle for standard passenger cars and motorhomes. Social distancing and personal hygiene protocols should be followed as normal.
      Some of the National Parks in the American Southwest have had to modify some operations due to COVID-19, such as Zion National Park now taking reservations for the Zion Canyon Shuttle. The best way to get current information on what facilities may be open (or closed) at the parks you wish to visit is to go to http://www.NPS.gov, which is the official website of the National Park Service. You can then search for a particular park from there. Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument is administered by the Bureau of Land Management, as is the Vermillion Cliffs National Monument.
      One piece of potentially bad news that I do have for you is that by order of the Navajo Indian Tribe, the Antelope Canyons are closed and are expected to remain closed for quite awhile. You should start thinking alternatives for slot canyon tours, and the most easily accessible slot canyon that is not subject to the closure of the Navajo Indian Reservation is Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Kanab, Utah, ~90 minutes from Page, AZ. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we recommend that you take one anyway. While the hike through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. Even then, people still get stuck. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. To explore Peek-A-Boo in safety and comfort, contact any one of these reputable tour companies to choose from in Kanab, UT:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      For stand-up paddleboarding or kayaking, you have several options. The first decision to make is whether you want to do this activity on Lake Powell or the Colorado River. If Lake Powell is where you’d like to explore, visit http://www.LakePowellPaddleboards.com If you’d prefer to kayak or SUP on the Colorado River, contact http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  7. We are looking to hike near Horseshoe Bend in October. We were wanting to do some slot hikes as well. I know that Antelope Canyon is closed. Are Rattlesnake Canyon and Mountain Sheep Canyon closed as well? Or is there any other slot canyons available for hiking at this time?

    1. Hi Kevin,
      That’s a really good question! Rattlesnake Canyon and Mountain Sheep Canyon are part of the Antelope Canyon drainage. Therefore, if the Antelope Canyons remain closed in October, so will Mountain Sheep and Rattlesnake.
      The good news is there are other slot canyons in the semi-immediate vicinity of Page, AZ, that are not beholden to the restrictions on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands. For most visitors, we recommend Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Kanab, UT, ~90 minutes from Page. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we recommend that you take one anyway. While the hike through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. Even then, people still get stuck. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. To explore Peek-A-Boo in safety and comfort, contact any one of these reputable tour companies to choose from in Kanab, UT:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      If you’re looking for something a little more rugged, try Wire Pass Canyon. Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which may feature deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Gabriela,
      Dogs are welcome at Horseshoe Bend as long as they are leashed at all times. Also, since it’s a desert environment, be sure to bring adequate water for yourself, your pet, and all members of your traveling party.
      If you are visiting during the summer months, remember that sugar sand can get VERY hot. Therefore, we recommend investing in a set of protective booties to keep your dog’s paws nice and cool.
      Regarding RV parks located near Horseshoe Bend, the closest one is Page/Lake Powell Campground, ~7 miles from Horseshoe Bend, in the town of Page, AZ. Another RV park worth considering is the Wahweap Campground, ~20 minutes from Horseshoe Bend, in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (entrance fees apply, not included in RV park rate). The afore-mentioned are developed campgrounds and have amenities such as full hook-ups, etc. There are other areas where people in RV’s can camp, but you may not have access to electrical hook-ups, which IMO you’d definitely want to have if traveling during the heat of summer, or dead of winter. If you agree, and prefer to stay in an RV park with hook-ups, advance reservations are strongly recommended. If you’re OK with more primitive/undeveloped areas, there’s no shortage of these either.
      For more information on the full range of possibilities, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Camping & RV Options
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  8. Hello,

    I have a trip scheduled to Arizona and was pretty upset that the antelope canyon is closed. From reading previous comments I’ve seen that the horseshoe bend is open, correct? If so, would you happen to know the address to the horseshoe bend where we can park the car and hike up to it? If you could let me know please. Thank you!

    1. Hi Manassa,
      You are correct in that the Antelope Canyons are closed at this time. Trust us, we feel your pain on that issue! They are expected to reopen “soon,” but when exactly that will be remains uncertain.
      The good news is that Horseshoe Bend is one of a few attractions in the area that never closed. The address is Mile Marker 545 of US89, Page, Arizona, 86040. Frankly, you don’t really need an address or GPS coordinates because the parking lot is quite large and very clearly signed. You literally can’t miss it!
      If Antelope Canyon happens to remain closed at the time of your visit, there are alternative slot canyons in the semi-immediate vicinity of Page, AZ, that are not subject to the closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Lands. For more information, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: “Help! My Antelope Canyon Tour Got Cancelled”
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  9. Hey Alley,
    I have a question about Horseshoe Bend, do you need a tour to see it, or can you go on your own? Also how far is it from the parking lot/ is it easy to find? Thanks so much 🙂

    Also, I see Antelope Canyon is closed 🙁 do you have any other suggestions besides Horseshoe bend for us to see while we are out in Page? Thank you!!!
    -Justine

    1. Hi Justine!
      Horseshoe Bend does not not require a guided tour to visit, you may simply go at your convenience while the parking lot is open (from sunrise to sunset). Parking is $10 for most passenger vehicles. It is very easy to find, very clearly signed near mile marker 545 of US89, about 5 miles South of the town of Page, Arizona.
      You are correct in that the Antelope Canyons are closed right now. Fortunately, there are plenty of other wonderful sightseeing opportunities in the semi-immediate vicinity of Page, AZ, that you can enjoy.
      After visiting Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds, you can walk across the steel arch bridge at the Glen Canyon Dam (the visitors center is closed due to COVID-19). If you’d like to take a refreshing dip in the water, head down to The Chains. It is a bit of a hike to get back up from the waterline, but if you’re in decent health, you can probably manage it. If you’re feeling peppy after a swim at the Chains, you might also take a short hike to the Hanging Gardens area. The springs are probably dry right now, but this is a neat little area, very unexpected to find in the desert.
      A short distance away, across the Glen Canyon Dam bridge, the “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock is a small but interesting cluster of rock formations, some of which resemble the Wave, but don’t require a permit to visit. Just bear in mind that there is also a campground in this area, so be sure that you don’t accidentally impede on someone’s space or privacy.
      If a slot canyon tour is still on the “must-do” list, take the short drive up US89 to Kanab, UT, and tour Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon. It’s a beautiful slot canyon that, like Upper Antelope Canyon, is easy walking, and features twists and turns on par with its more famous counterpart in Page, AZ. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you take one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. There are several reputable companies to choose from in Kanab, UT, including:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Ally,
        This was super helpful as we plan a family trip done their to page this weekend. It is a true bummer that Antelope Canyon is currently closed. I was wondering about Lake Powell. Is there a beach access down to the lake, where we can sort of relax, picnic etc. I heard about Lone Rock campground but is that the only access? If so, is there a fee or reservation that I must do? Any advise would be greatly appreciated!!

        1. Hi Omar,
          There are several areas on Lake Powell where you can, as you put, relax, picnic, etc.!
          The easiest one to access is The Chains, on the Eastern flank of the Glen Canyon Dam. It is a bit of a hike to get down to the waterline, and even more of a hike to get back up to the parking area, but if your family are all relatively healthy, you should be able to manage it. There are no picnic tables in this area, so you’d have to improvise a bit on that front, but lots of folks do, plus there’s a neat little hike you can piggy-back onto a visit here called the Hanging Gardens. The springs are probably dry, but it’s still an unexpected find in the desert! The nice thing about this area, too, is that you don’t have to pay an entrance fee to get in.
          Another area you might consider visiting is the Wahweap Swim Beach. This area is within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so you would have to pay the entrance fee (which is good for 1 week), but it has a developed picnic area with tables, grills, and shade canopies, which is nice to have access to on a hot day! Here again, it’s a bit of a walk to the waterline, but in this case, mostly flat. Lone Rock Beach is another good option, but it tends to be quite crowded with campers, boaters, etc. Lone Rock is also within the Glen Canyon NRA, so an entrance fee is required. If you decide to visit both it and the Wahweap Swim Beach, simply keep your entrance fee receipt as it is good for 7 days.
          Hope that helps!
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

      1. Is floating open? Is horseshoe bend the wave and antelope canyon open? What’s the cost to park and go in to these? Also for floating? If not open, when will they open?

        1. Hi Stephanie,
          Thank you for your clear, concise inquiry!
          The Horseshoe Bend Rafting Trip is unfortunately cancelled for the remainder of the season due to COVID-19 🙁 If your visit to the Page, AZ, area is scheduled for sometime in 2020, a good alternative would be to drive to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, and paddle the 15 mile stretch of the Colorado River back to Lees Ferry. There are several companies that offer this alternative tour, but the one we’re most familiar with is Kayak Horseshoe Bend. Visit that website for more information about cost, schedules, etc.
          Horseshoe Bend, we are happy to report, is one of the few attractions that never closed through all this. It may be visited at one’s leisure, between sunrise and sunset. The parking fee for standard passenger cars is $10. We recommend visiting just after sunrise to enjoy cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
          Antelope Canyon, unfortunately, remains closed for the time being. When it will reopen, is anybody’s guess. To be placed on a priority e-mail list to be notified of when it reopens, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ. Should the Antelope Canyons remain closed at the time of your visit, a good alternative would be Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you take one. While the hike through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. Even then, people still get stuck, and if you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. Reputable tour companies in Kanab, UT, are:
          – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
          – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
          – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
          – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
          – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
          Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  10. Hi Alley!
    You seem to be very knowledgeable about all things AZ, so Im hoping you can help me out!
    My friends and I are venturing out to Arizona and Utah this Wednesday! I am curious to know if there have been any changes such as new openings or closing. We are really interested in Monument Valley, the Four Corners, and Antelope Canyon. Even if you could direct me to a website as to which attractions are open to visitors I would greatly appreciate it (:

    1. Hey Morgan,
      Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but Navajo Nation Tribal Parks are slated to remain closed, optimistically, through the end of August, pesimistically, “until further notice.”
      A site to monitor for any change in status would be http://www.NavajoNationParks.org A couple of “saving graces,” if you can call it that, is that highway US163 from Kayenta through Monument Valley remains open since it is a pretty important shipping corridor. You can still get good views of Monument Valley on a “drive-by” basis, plus historic Goulding’s Lodge has managed to remain open with modified services. If you do visit this area, be sure to wear a mask and practice personal hygiene measures as prescribed by the CDC and WHO.
      As for the Antelope Canyons and Four Corners, they’re a no go 🙁 Fortunately, however, there are several beautiful slot canyons in the semi-immediate vicinity of Antelope Canyon that are not subject to the closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Parks. We recommend Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT, if you’re looking for a family-friendly experience. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you take one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. There are several reputable companies to choose from in Kanab, UT, including:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      If you’re wanting something more adventurous, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which may feature deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Hope that helps! To get notified immediately if/when the Antelope Canyons reopen, visit our companion site to get on a priority e-mail list at http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  11. Hi Alley

    I am planning on bringing my wife and kids (16 and 14) on trip to Horseshoe Bend, Antelope Canyon, Las Vegas, The Narrows and the Grand Canyon in March of 2021.
    I was wonder if you can give as much info as possible? I will be at Horseshoe Bend and Antelope for 2 days of our trip. How is the weather normally, where should I stay for the 2 nights, what time of the day should we go, what tour guide should we use for the Antelope Canyon tour? And of course any other info would be greatly appreciative. How intense or how far is the hike?

    1. Hey Chris,
      Visiting in March, you should be aware that this is in the transitional period between winter and spring. You could encounter days that are sunny and brisk, or you could run into a blizzard, it just depends! Of course, it’s too soon to call, but the main point is to be prepared for anything weather-wise. Start monitoring the weather about 2 weeks before you get set to travel. That will give you the best idea of what kind of clothing to pack.
      Due to the high probability of cold weather, The Narrows in Zion may not happen for you seeing as though that trip has you walking through water. If that’s the case, don’t fret too much over it; there are plenty of good hikes to enjoy in Zion. If your family is relatively fit, which it sounds as though you are, you might look at Angel’s Landing. Along with The Narrows, it is considered the “holy grail” of Zion hikes.
      As for your time at Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon, Page, AZ, is where you should stay for that leg of your trip; that’s the gateway community for both attractions, as well as Lake Powell. Regarding which tour company to go with, all advertised guide services are well-rated and licensed by the Navajo Indian Tribe. Tours are virtually identical, right down to the footstep, and comparable in price. For more information, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon Difficulty and/or intensity of the hike depends on which branch of the canyon you tour. Upper Antelope is an easy, flat 100 yard out-and-back walk. Lower Antelope is ~1 mile and involves navigating some stairs, ladders, and small boulders. Alternate sections of the Antelope Canyon are usually comparable to Lower Antelope, or slightly more difficult. Mid-day is generally regarded as the best time to tour Antelope Canyon for lighting and photography, but other times of day offer their own advantages. Long story short, there’s no such thing as a bad time to go; simply book a tour at a time that works for you!
      When you go to the Grand Canyon, you should try to stay inside the park at Grand Canyon Village if possible. If that area is already sold out (which is a very real possibility at this point), then Tusayan, AZ, 7 miles outside the park, is your next best alternative. Grand Canyon hotels
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  12. Any ETA on the reopening of Antelope Canyon. We are visiting September 14 for 3 days and I am officially sad, when I discovered they are closed.

    1. Hey Lisa,
      We, too, are sad that the Antelope Canyons will remain closed for the rest of the summer 🙁
      As to whether they will reopen by the time you get here, that remains uncertain. If they are still closed at the time of your vacation, the good news is that there are other slot canyons in the area that are not subject to the closure of the Navajo Nation.
      We recommend Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT, if you’re looking for a family-friendly experience. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you take one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. There are several reputable companies to choose from in Kanab, UT, including:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      If you’re wanting something more adventurous, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which may feature deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Hope that helps! To get notified immediately if/when the Antelope Canyons reopen, visit our companion site to get on a priority e-mail list at http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  13. Is there clear signage on the road leading you to horshoebend in case I lose service and will my sedan be okay or do I need a 4WD car? Also are there any free campsites accessible in the area? Also can I access Lake Powell through a walk near horseshoe bend? Or rent a kayak?

    1. Hi Zee!
      The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is extremely easy to find, approximately 5 miles south of the town of Page, AZ, on US Highway 89 North. Signage is very clear and prominent, and the main access road into the parking lot is paved, so no need for a 4WD vehicle. The pedestrian trail to the canyon rim is ~.7 miles one-way and mostly flat, but it is almost completely exposed, so during the summer months, it will be very hot. Be sure to wear/bring adequate sun protection and water, and wear appropriate shoes for walking.
      There is no access to Lake Powell or the Colorado River from Horseshoe Bend. To get to Lake Powell, you would have to drive ~10 minutes from Horseshoe Bend to either Wahweap Marina or Antelope Point Marina. Kayaks can be rented from several outlets in Page, AZ, or you can take a guided tour if you prefer. To kayak through Horseshoe Bend, you’d have to drive down to Lees Ferry, rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle back to Lees Ferry. For more information on this activity, visit http://www.KayakHorseshoeBend.com
      As for free camping, there is none in the immediate area of Horseshoe Bend or Page, AZ. Prices for tent or RV camping sites in Page, AZ, vary from place to place, but one word of caution re: tent camping at this time of year — it’s HOT. Nighttime low temperatures aren’t getting too far below 75 degrees at this time of year, which can make tent camping VERY uncomfortable. Best to spring for an RV site with electrical hook-ups or a hotel room in Page, AZ, so you can have access to reliable air conditioning!
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Gregg, and thanks for your compliments!
      Whether to visit Horseshoe Bend at sunrise or sunset is one of those 6-of-one/half-a-dozen-of-another conundrums. Both timeframes have their pros and cons. Just after sunrise, for example, the Colorado River will be in shadow the sun gets higher overhead until mid-morning. At sunset, you have the sun in your eyes since the overlook faces due West, but that’s when you can potentially capture the elusive “starburst” that occurs just before the sun disappears over the horizon.
      Honestly, though, I’m the worst photographer ever, so you shouldn’t take my word as gospel. A few years ago, a photographer named Brian Klimowski took the time to photograph Horseshoe Bend from sunrise to sunset and every time in between! To see the results of his work, and his patience, check out our “Horseshoe Bend Sunrise to Sunset Photo Series
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  14. My wife and I are planning to visit horseshoe bend next weekend. Is there a cost to bike riders at the Horseshoe bend parking lot? Are there bike racks where we can lock them? Can we take them on the trail?
    Thanks for being a great resource,
    Scott

    1. Hi Scott, and thank you for this excellent question!
      Bikes are subject to a $5/person parking fee. There are no bike racks on-site, but you can probably find a parking pole or something similar to lock your bikes down to. Bikes are not allowed on the trail, only wheelchairs.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  15. Hi Alley,

    You’ve got a very helpful website, thanks for that! We plan to visit Horseshoe Bend with an RV and a dog. Is there a special RV parking space and is it possible to hike from there (with the dog) to the Horseshoe Bend? Also, how early should you get there to get a spot, what would you recommend? We will probably arrive in the afternoon and think about trying to get directly to the Horseshoe Bend before checking in at a nearby campground.

    Thanks you in advance!
    Elena

    1. Hi Elena,
      The new Horseshoe Bend Parking Lot does have special spaces designated for RV’s, and you are welcome to visit with dogs as long as they are leashed at all times. You should also bring enough water for yourself and your pet, and if you’re visiting during the summer months, we strongly recommend outfitting him/her with a set of protective booties so they don’t burn their paws on the hot sand.
      We actually recommend visiting Horseshoe Bend in the hours just after sunrise so you can take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. In August, sunrise takes place at around 5:45 AM.
      Hope that helps, and that you have reservations for your chosen campground.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hey Alley, I am wondering if you could help me find the GPS Coordinates to Horseshoe Bend? I’m having a hard time finding it based on no real address. I was married here and we are trying to get the GPS coordinates printed. Could you help?

      2. Alley,

        Do you know of a kayak tour or boat tour you can take to see Antelope Canyons? Which would you recommend?

        Thanks
        JD

        1. Hi JD,
          There are several companies that offer Antelope Canyon boat tours or kayak tours of Antelope Canyon. All are authorized by the National Park Service and have excellent safety and service records, so you really can’t go wrong with any one of them.
          For kayak tours:
          – Hidden Canyon Kayak (928) 660-1836 http://www.lakepowellhiddencanyonkayak.com/
          – Kayak Lake Powell (928) 660-0778 http://www.kayakpowell.com/
          – Lake Powell Paddleboards & Kayaks (928) 645-4017 http://www.lakepowellpaddleboards.com/
          – Lake Powell Adventure Company (928) 660-9683 https://www.lakepowelladventure.com/
          For boat tours:
          – Lake Powell Resort & Marina (888) 896-3829 https://www.lakepowell.com/marinas/boat-tours/
          – Antelope Point Marina (928) 645-5900 https://grandcanyon.com/tours/east-tours/antelope-canyon-boat-tours/
          Of course, you should be sure to verify that the above-referenced businesses are even open or operating at reduced capacity due to COVID-19.
          Good luck and safe travels!
          Alley 🙂

  16. Hello Alley,

    We are planning a last minute trip to Horseshoe bend this weekend. I would like to take my two dogs. Do you recommend it? i see that the weather will be at mid 90’s. Also, can you inform me of nearby places where we can go for a swim- possibly dog friendly too?
    thank you,

    blessing,
    Nancy

    1. Hi Nancy,
      It is indeed hot at Horseshoe Bend these days. That’s why we recommend, if at all possible, that you try and visit in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Dogs must be leashed at all times, and you must be sure to carry enough water for yourselves and your pets. We also recommend investing in protective booties for your dog’s feet as surfaces tend to get very hot at this time of year. We certainly wouldn’t want to hear about your dog’s feet getting burned!
      As for places where you and your dogs might enjoy a swim, The Chains area, on the Eastern flank of the Glen Canyon Dam, is popular with locals because you don’t have to pay the park entrance fee to access it. Last I heard, dogs were allowed, I took my own dogs there when I lived in Page, AZ. One word of caution, though, is that it is quite a schlep to get back up from the waterline, depending on where you hike down to. Another good spot you might take them to is Lone Rock Beach. It is ~15-20 minutes from Page, AZ, located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (entrance fee required) and a popular spot with campers, so you won’t be alone there by any means. The walk to the waterline is pretty straightforward, although you might encounter deep sand in some spots.
      Wherever you decide to go, be sure your dog is leashed at all times, and again, carry water because you are in the desert in the middle of summer!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  17. We’re planning to come visit in late October. What will the temperatures be like here at that time of year ? Do you recommend any certain time of day to visit that are better for photos and more vibrant rock colors ?

    1. Hi Christina!
      Late October is a wonderful time to visit the American Southwest. Temperatures in the lower elevation areas, such as Page, AZ, Kanab, UT, etc., are just about perfect, ranging from the mid-60’s to low-70’s. In the higher country, such as Grand Canyon North Rim and Bryce Canyon, they are borderline cold, in the 40’s-50’s or thereabouts.
      As for a good time of day to visit Horseshoe Bend for photography, there’s no such thing as a “bad” time, but mid-morning or early-afternoon tend to be when the river is not in shadow, yet there is some nice shadow play on the canyon walls. For the sake of practicality, though, the timeframe just after sunrise when the parking lot first opens affords the benefits of smaller crowds. Although Glen Canyon is in shadow at that time, we’ve never had any complaints from people who took a bad photo!
      For more suggestions, check out “The Best Time To Visit Horseshoe Bend.”
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley Keosheyan 🙂

    2. I was just at Horseshoe Bend this morning and was trying to balance getting there before the crowds and when the light would be good, with not waking my kids (ages 6-18) too early. We got there about 90 minutes after sunrise and it was tricky because the top half of the rock was lit but the bottom half and the river were still in shadow. It would have been better for all one or the other. It was only about half a mile from the parking lot, so I wish I would have just gone as soon as the parking lot opened by myself for photos and gone back later with my kids.

      1. Hi Corinne,
        Thank you for sharing your insight into the photographic and logistical nuances of visiting Horseshoe Bend!
        Alley 🙂

  18. Hi Alley! First, I want to give you a shoutout for being the real MVP and responding to all of these comments. Second, I’m planning to run an independent virtual marathon this year and I am hoping to do so in the Navajo Nation. Would Horseshoe Bend be a good place? If not, would you have any suggestions? I’m planning to do this in October or early November at the latest.

    1. O O O, thank you so much for your kind compliments!
      Your virtual marathon sounds like an interesting endeavor. If any of it should physically take place on Navajo Indian Tribal Land, however, a special use permit, or some manner of written permission, from the tribe would be a must. Complicating matters is that due to COVID-19, all Navajo Indian Tribal Lands and attractions are closed to outsiders. Horseshoe Bend has shared jurisdiction by the National Park Service, the City of Page (they run the parking lot), and the Navajo Tribe, whose lands flank the overlook on its South side. If you think it sounds complicated, it is. As for whether restrictions will be lifted by October or November is anyone’s guess.
      If you like to run, you might consider taking part in the upcoming Lake Powell Half Marathon, which is taking place IRL Saturday October 10th of this year.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe running,
      Alley 🙂

  19. Hi Alley, Just wanted to say how helpful reading this comment strand has been as I plan for my upcoming visit. Thank you so much for all of this important and up-to-date tips and advice.

    1. Kay,
      Thank you for taking the time to let us know our advice helped!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Carlos,
      If by “overland” you mean camp, in a tent or RV, no, it is not allowed at Horseshoe Bend. For more information on campgrounds in the vicinity of Horseshoe Bend, read this piece on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: RV & Camping Options Near Antelope Canyon
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hello Alley,

        We really would like a guide showing us and our two kids around.
        Do you think there are guides available on Sunday 26th?

        Thank a lot for the info on this site.

        1. Dear Rolf,
          Sorry to reply to your query after the fact. Hopefully you were able to find out that a guide isn’t really necessary to have a fulfilling visit to Page, AZ, and Horseshoe Bend.
          Take care,
          Alley 🙂

          1. Hi Earlon,
            Horseshoe Bend is one of a few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed. The Antelope Canyons, however, remain closed through August 16th by executive order of the Navajo Indian Tribe. For suggestions of other slot canyons you can still tour, read this piece on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: “Help! My Antelope Canyon Tour Got Cancelled”
            We are not the “official” website, but like to think we’re pretty darn close 😉 The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, but the Horseshoe Bend parking lot is administered by the City of Page, AZ. The land on the Southern flank of the overlook is administered by the Navajo Indian Tribe.
            Hope that makes sense. Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Chanel,
      Yes, there is a fee to park at Horseshoe Bend. The rates are as follows:
      – Motorcycle: $5
      – Car or RV: $10
      – Commercial Van/Bus: (Passenger Capacity up to 14) $35
      – Commercial Bus: (Passenger Capacity 15-35) $70
      – Commercial Bus: (Passenger Capacity over 35) $140
      Entrance fees are based on the passenger capacity of the vehicle, not the number of passengers being carried at time of entry.
      Advance reservations are not required to visit anytime between sunrise and sunset.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. No – it’s the desert, very dry area, so anything combustible that could start a fire is strongly discouraged.

      1. Hello, I was wondering what the distance is to the viewpoint for horseshoe bend? Is it considered a difficult hike?

        1. Hi LeAla,
          The hike to Horseshoe Bend is .7 miles 1 way, 1.4 miles round-trip. It’s relatively flat, considered moderate for most individuals. Nowadays, the biggest obstacle for most visitors is the heat. It’s getting up above 110 degrees Fahrenheit in Page, AZ, of late, and here is little to no shade along the trail (save for a small covered pavillion) to Horseshoe Bend. You must bring enough water for all members of your party, and wear sun protection.
          In light of these considerations, we recommend visiting Horseshoe Bend in the hours just after sunrise to enjoy cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  20. hey? is there any waterfalls around horseshoe bend or close to havasu falls that you can hike with no special permit? we are coming from las vegas so anything that may be on the way is fine! because i know now the havasu falls is close? thank you for your time!

    1. Hey Albert,
      Sorry to be the bearer of bad news here, but there are no waterfalls that are that easily accessible out here. Havasu Falls, which requires a very hard-to-obtain permit, is closed until further notice due to COVID-19.
      The place which will have the most easily accessible waterfalls is Zion National Park, which is ~90 minutes – 2 hours from Horseshoe Bend. The easiest to access would probably be the Emerald Pools, seconded by Mystery Falls in the Narrows. The downside (one of several) is that this year, Zion National Park’s shuttle service requires advance reservations due to COVID-19. Also, they’re discouraging people from hiking in the Virgin River due to an algae bloom. If you wish to visit the park, I recommend you get there early. For more information, visit National Park Service: Zion National Park
      I’m not sure where else you might be traveling to, but Lower Calf Creek Falls is a beautiful waterfall with a refreshing pool at its foot. It’s a long way from Page, AZ, ~ a 4-hour drive, and a long but easy hike, ~5.5 miles round-trip.
      Kanarra Falls is another one you might consider, it’s located near Cedar City, UT, ~3 hours from Page, AZ. That’s a neat hike, moderately difficult, with a few tree limbs and ladders to navigate, but it goes through a slot canyon with water in it. Advance reservations are required to visit. For more information, visit http://www.KanarraFalls.com
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Callie,
      Both Horseshoe Bend and Grand Canyon National Park are open. However, if you’re planning on going to the South Rim, take note: the East entrance to Grand Canyon South Rim at Desert View Point is closed due to the section of the highway leading up to it being on Navajo Tribal Land, which is partially closed due to COVID-19. Therefore, you’d have to drive from Horseshoe Bend to Flagstaff, AZ, then get on US180 to AZ64 heading up to the park. This diversion means that a 2.5-3 hour drive is now a 4-5 hour drive. Grand Canyon North Rim is ~2.5-3 hours from Page, AZ, and is now open for visitation, so it may be the better option to visit at this time. For more information, visit GrandCanyon.com: North Rim Planning
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi, I was planning to make the drive to horseshoe bend this afternoon and I saw on the all trails app something about a trail reroute which started July 2020. I couldn’t find any other information about this though so could you let me know if that’s true and if so what the situation is and where to park/ where the trailhead starts?

        1. Hi Sophia!
          So sorry that I’m late in responding to your inquiry, I hope you found your way to Horseshoe Bend OK.
          For those wondering about similar issues, the trail to the rim of Glen Canyon at Horseshoe Bend was flattened, graded, and rerouted slightly, so it is a trifle longer than the “social” trail carved out in years past. This means that the walk to the overlook is now .7 miles one-way vs .6 miles, but it is now wheelchair accessible. The parking area is very clearly signed, about 5 miles South of the town of Page, AZ, where a one-time fee of $10/passenger vehicle or RV or $35/light commercial vehicle is collected. Horseshoe Bend Parking Lot Reopens, Implements Fees
          Good luck and safe travels to all,
          Alley 🙂

  21. Hi, we are planning on going to Horseshoe Bend in the morning and then to Lake Powell for swimming after that. Where is the best place to go near the water so the kids can climb on the rocks and cliff jump into the water?

    1. Hi again, Divora!
      After visiting Horseshoe Bend, there are several good swim beaches you can visit! Before I make any recommendations, though, I have to tell you that cliff diving is a practice that is illegal here at Lake Powell, and for good reason. I personally am/was acquainted with one person who died, and another who became permanently disabled while doing so! That said, there are plenty of opportunities to climb on some rocks and jump in the water from safer heights.
      The place closest to Horseshoe Bend is The Chains, on the Eastern flank of the Glen Canyon Steel Arch Bridge. You have to hike down a ways to the water’s edge, which means you also have to hike back up, but the cool thing about The Chains is that you don’t have to pay the park entrance fee to get in. Also, you can easily piggy-back a visit to The Chains with a hike to the Hanging Gardens if desired.
      If you’re OK with paying the Glen Canyon Park Entrance Fee, then you might visit the Wahweap Swim Beach just across the road from the Wahweap Campground. It has shades, picnic tables, and BBQ grills. Just a short distance West of there is an area called The Coves, but that may not be as accessible as it was in years past due to lower lake levels. Here again, if paying the Glen Canyon Park Entrance Fee isn’t a problem (it’s good for a week’s time), Lone Rock Beach is another popular swimming spot, although you must be prepared to share it with a lot of boats, jet skis, etc., which can make the water quite choppy. Also, be sure you don’t drive too far into the sand, or you might get stuck.
      Hope that helps — good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  22. what is the latest you can enter and the earliest you can enter to hike horseshoe bend at the end of July? Thank you!

    1. Hi Angelica,
      The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is open from sunrise to sunset daily. In late July, sunrise occurs at about 5:30 AM and sunset takes place at around 7:30 PM.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  23. Do you know what is opened for older kids near horseshoe bend to go swimming or where I can find information on what’s around there. We decided a last minute trip to page but have no idea what’s around. Last minute sucks, but our other plans got canceled due to covid-19 🤦‍♀️ do you know if lake Powell is doing their fireworks?

    1. Hi Brittany,
      Addressing your questions in reverse order, Page, AZ’s 4th of July fireworks are scheduled to go on as planned. The best vantage points are in and around the Lake Powell Golf Course, so mask up and bring a lawn chair!
      As for swimming areas, you have several choices. The easiest to access is The Chains, on the Eastern flank of the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge. It’s a bit of a hike to and from the water line, but since you mention you have older kids, they should be able to handle it. If you want, you can easily piggy-back a visit there onto a neat little hike to a place called the Hanging Gardens. The springs there are probably dry, but it’s a nice easy walk. The Chains & Hanging Gardens Hike Entrance to The Chains is free since it is outside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area boundary.
      If you don’t mind paying the Glen Canyon Park Entrance Fee, a couple of other swimming areas worth considering are the Wahweap Swim Beach and Lone Rock Beach. The former has picnic tables, restrooms, and BBQ grills nearby. The latter is very sandy, so if you’re not in a vehicle with 4WD, don’t drive too far onto the beach and risk getting stuck! Also, be prepared to share it with campers and boaters.
      Hope that helps!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  24. Is hiking horseshoe bend still available during this COVID restricted time? Looking to get away from my house this weekend

    1. Hi Ashlee,
      Yes, Horseshoe Bend is open. It is one of the few attractions in the area that never closed.
      Parking lot hours are from sunrise to sunset. We strongly encourage visiting in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Although the overlook remains open, you should still practice social distancing and personal guidelines protocols as recommended by the CDC, WHO, and the National Park Service:
      – Wear a mask.
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  25. Hi there,

    We are in an RV at the campground nearby. Would we be able to park our RV in your parking lot or do we need to ride our bikes over (we don’t have any other vehicles)?

    Thanks so much,
    Gen

    1. Hi Gen,
      This is a great question!
      The Horseshoe Bend parking lot does have sufficient space to accommodate RV’s, but you may wish to ride your bicycles over for the exercise.
      If you’re staying at the Page/Lake Powell Campground in Page, AZ, Horseshoe Bend is ~5 miles (one way) away, approximately a 30-45 minute ride as estimated by Google Maps.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hello! We are from Tennessee.
        Me and my family are planning to go this coming Sunday, I would like to know if is open, how much is the entrance and if is dangerous for my baby 18 months because of the hot weather, and I want to to if I can wear sandals.
        Please let me know, we are in Phoenix and before we go I want to make sure that we are safe. 🙂

        Thanks!

        Thanks!

        Is our first time.
        Please let me know.

        1. Hi Diana,
          Apologies for not getting to your inquiry sooner, I, too was traveling this weekend!
          Hopefully you found your way to Horseshoe Bend without much difficulty and discovered that the parking fee is $10/standard passenger vehicle or $35/light commercial vehicle.
          For those wanting to travel to the area in the near future, yes, it is very hot right now, which can be dangerous for infants and young children IF they are not propertly hydrated and protected from the sun. Be sure to wear a hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen, and to bring enough water for yourself and all members of your traveling parties.
          Regarding footwear, you can do whatever you want, the City of Page and/or the National Park Service assume no responsibility for injury or inconvenience you might sustain during your visit, but to be 100% honest, sandals are not recommended at this time of year. The trail to Horseshoe Bend may pass through deep “sugar” sand, which gets very hot during the summer months. Closed-toed shoes will protect you better and ensure that you don’t burn your feet.
          Good luck and safe travels to all,
          Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Vitul,
          Yes, Horseshoe Bend is open. It is one of the few attractions in the area that never closed.
          Parking lot hours are from sunrise to sunset. We strongly encourage visiting in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Although the overlook remains open, you should still practice social distancing and personal guidelines protocols as recommended by the CDC, WHO, and the National Park Service:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Meg,
      I sure wish I knew where you saw this, because it is not correct.
      Horseshoe Bend is open; it is one of the few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed, so come on up!
      Remember that the parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, also that summertime temperatures are VERY hot. If at all possible, try to time your visit for the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Please remember also to practice social distancing and personal hygiene guidelines as prescribed by the CDC:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Jodie,
          Happy to say that that’s not the case! Horseshoe Bend remains one of the few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, so come on up.
          Remember that the parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, also that summertime temperatures are VERY hot. If at all possible, try to time your visit for the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Be sure to bring enough water for yourself and your traveling party. Please remember also to practice social distancing and personal hygiene guidelines as prescribed by the CDC:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Nick,
          Dogs are welcome at Horseshoe Bend and Lake Powell as long as they are leashed, and you pick up after them. Since the trail and surrounding grounds consist of potentially deep sand, which gets very hot during the summer months, we also recommend that you provide protective booties for your dog (such as these), and enough water for yourself, your traveling party, and your dog.
          If you should be traveling during the warmer months of summer, you might consider timing your visit for the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Viviana,
      Horseshoe Bend is one of a few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed, so come on up! Remember that the parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset, and please remember to practice social distancing and personal hygiene guidelines as prescribed by the CDC:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  26. As you’re standing and looking at Horseshoe Bend, there is the sandstone rock to the right to climb. How high are you climbing to get to the top of it?

    1. Hi Sandra,
      The “climb” is not far, maybe 3 meters or so? While it is manageable for most healthy people, a close eye should be kept on young children so they don’t fall and hurt themselves.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Ana,
      The trail to the Horseshoe Bend Overlook is ~1.4 miles round-trip. We recommend setting aside 90 minutes to 2 hours to walk to the rim, take photos, and walk back to the parking lot. If your visit is taking place within the next few weeks, please bear in mind that it’s very hot here and the trail is completely exposed. There is a small shade pavillion near the rim, but you must carry enough water for your hiking party, and wear/bring sun protection such as hats, sunglasses, and sunscreen.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Jessica!
          It depends who you ask.
          The walk from the parking lot to the Horseshoe Bend Overlook is ~.7 miles, one way. While the trail has been recently graded and is much more even and wide than the previously-used “social” trail, it may still be a bit challenging for young children, the elderly, or those with mobility issues to handle. I recommend you watch this recent video of the hike to Horseshoe Bend to judge for yourself. The narration is in Vietnamese, but there are some English language titles with good tips for visitors. If you determine that the walk might be a bit too much for yourself or anyone else in your party to handle, check out these alternate means of visiting Horseshoe Bend: “Help! I Can’t Do The Hike To Horseshoe Bend” Please note that Horseshoe Bend Tours may not be operating at the time of your visit due to the closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Lands due to COVID-19.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  27. Hello everyone,
    I am confused because when I write Horseshoe Bend or Horseshoe Canyon, they are two different places and far away from each other on google maps so to know which one I d like to see, I click both names on google images and come the same pictures…which one is The one to visit?

    Thanks a lot!

    1. Hi Sophie,
      Surprise, there are many places called “Horseshoe Bend” located throughout the U.S. Unfortunately, Google still gets some of them mixed up. The iconic, instagrammable Horseshoe Bend — THE one to visi — is located near the town Page, AZ.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  28. Hello, my friends and I are driving from Phoenix and we were wondering if the access to horseshoe bend closes and when ? we were thinking of arriving around 5 pm to avoid the sun being very strong during the day. Do you think that would be a good idea ?

    1. Hi Dalal,
      The Horseshoe Bend overlook and parking lot are open between sunrise and sunset, so technically, you could get there at 5:00 PM if you wished.
      However, if you want to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds, we recommend visiting during the hours just after sunrise. Hopefully you plan on spending the night in Page, AZ, so you can easily do this!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Dear Youngsoo,
          Barring anything unforeseen, the Horseshoe Bend Overlook will be open for visitation from sunrise to sunset on June 21st! During the hot days of summer, we recommend visiting just after sunrise to enjoy cooler temperatures and smaller crowds!
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  29. Hello!

    I am planning on going to Horseshoe Bend in a week and a half. I was wondering if you could give me any tips/advice? How is parking? Do I need to make a reservation to enter the park? Anything would help, thanks!

    1. Hi Thao,
      The parking situation at Horseshoe Bend tends to vary throughout the day. We can tell you that the overlook is busiest between the hours of 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM, when the day trippers from Phoenix, Las Vegas, Flagstaff, and other gateway communities are rolling in. Another consideration, though, is that your visit is occurring during one of the hottest times of the year. Daytime high temperatures can (and frequently do) inch up over 100 degrees Fahrenheit during the mid-day hours. That’s why we strongly recommend visiting in the hours just after sunrise (~5:00 AM) to enjoy cooler temperatures, and smaller crowds.
      Reservations are not required to visit Horseshoe Bend. You simply pay the parking fee of $10/standard passenger vehicle or $35/light commercial vehicle and go!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Jen,
      You’ll be pleased to know that the Horseshoe Bend Overlook was one of a few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, so come on up! Just be sure to observe social distancing and personal hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO.
      The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset. In June, the weather is hot, so we strongly recommend timing your visit for the timeframe just after sunrise (~5:00 AM) to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  30. I will be visiting AZ in July. I would like to see the Grand Canyon, Horseshoe Bend, and Antelope Canyon. Are dogs allowed to accompany my hikes in these places?

    1. Hi Sophia!
      This is a really good question 😉 The answer: let’s just say two out of three ain’t bad.
      Dogs are welcome in Grand Canyon National Park as long as they are on a leash and remain on paved trails. They can’t go with you on any inner canyon trails such as the Bright Angel or Kaibab Trails. They can also accompany you to Horseshoe Bend, as long as they are leashed and remain on established trails. One thing about the time of year you’re traveling is it’s HOT, which means surfaces like asphalt and sand can be very hard on your dog’s paws. You might want to invest in a set of booties for your fur baby. Also, be sure and bring enough water for your hiking party, and your pet, and be sure to pick up after them at all times.
      The Antelope Canyons do not allow dogs, due to the ruggedness of the terrain, and the fact that these slot canyons are on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands. There are a few dog boarding and day care facilities in Page, AZ that you might utilize when you visit Antelope Canyon. Another option would be to visit a slot canyon that is not situated on Indian Reservation land, such as Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch. These beautiful slot canyons are located between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on BLM land. They do not require a guided tour to visit, and dogs (on leash) are allowed. However, these canyons are in a very remote area, and the trailhead located on a dirt road (the House Rock Valley Road), which can be rendered impassable when wet. Plus, if you’re in a rental car, you would void your insurance the moment your wheels leave the pavement, which would put you on the hook for any damage you might sustain.
      Hope this helps. Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley

          1. Hi! Roughly how long is the hike described above from the parking lot to the vantage point? With the raft tours shut down, trying to figure out if my kids could make the hike. Thanks so much!

          2. Hi Catherine,
            The trail from the parking lot to the overlook is .7 miles one-way. It is partially paved, the other half is graded, and is somewhat more even and flatter than the previously-used “social” trail. Kids can and do make the hike every day, but only you can determine if your kids should attempt it. If you determine that they can’t, you may consider flying over it by airplane or helicopter. Horseshoe Bend Air Tours
            BTW, the Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip floats down the Colorado River through Horseshoe Bend. There is no way to walk from the overlook to the river, just so you know.
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Danielle,
        Unfortunately you are correct: the Antelope Canyons are indeed closed until further notice.
        However, there are other slot canyons near Page, AZ, that offer beautiful scenery and unforgettable adventure, but are not bound by the closures of Navajo Indian Land. Red Canyon aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon (not to be confused with Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Escalante, UT!) would be the one I’d recommend to most visitors. This beautiful slot canyon, with twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, is located near Kanab, UT, ~1 hour from Page, AZ. It’s a short but fun walk featuring classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you utiize one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. There are several reputable companies to choose from in Kanab, UT, including:
        – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
        – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
        – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
        – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
        – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermillioncliffs.net
        Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

  31. Good day to you. My question is about accessibility. I am handicapped and walk with a cane….very, very slowly. Is the hike to the bend possible for someone like me? I can bring my walker for rest stops if that is even feasible. I take a long time to cover the same ground as a fully functional whippersnapper but I get there! Are there well worn paths or is it pretty much out of the question? Any brutally honest response and/or suggestions are greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.
    Most Kind Regards,
    R. Raymond

    1. Hi Rebekah!
      You’ll be happy to know that you’re not the first, and certainly won’t be the last person to take the Horseshoe Bend walk at a slower pace. And there’s nothing wrong with that at all; as you’ve hopefully gathered from the article you read, it shouldn’t be about how fast you get there! In recent months, the trail to the Horseshoe Bend Overlook was partially paved and graded. While it’s now slightly longer than in years past (~1.4 miles round-trip vs 1.2 in its former state), it’s flatter, so individuals with a walker or cane should have an easier time navigating it. Plus, there are several strategically placed benches where you can take a rest or water break if desired. IMO the biggest issue you should be concerned about is shade, or lack thereof. Horseshoe Bend is very exposed, and during the summer months, daytime temperatures can soar up and over 110 degrees (F). Incidents of heat stroke, a few that have ended in fatalities, have occurred. Therefore, we recommend that summertime visitors, especially those with mobility or health concerns, visit during the cooler hours just after sunrise. Another benefit of getting there early: fewer people to contend with!
      If, after considering all that, you feel the walk will be too much for you, visit “Help! I Can’t Do The Hike To Horseshoe Bend” for suggestions on other ways to see it with less effort.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  32. Hi Alley,
    We are planning to take a family trip to the Glen Canyon area which including the Upper/Lower Antelop, Horse Bend, etc. We will be driving from Texas and this will be our first time to visit this area so hopefully you can give us some guidances for this trip during the reopening of the country.
    Do we need to make a reservation for any of this place?
    Are there any specific requirements like face mask, limited number of people per group?
    Can we driving straight to these places, our must take tours?
    Any other nice places such as waterfalls, sightseeing around this area?
    Thank you very much!

    1. Hi Cong,
      Since I have family in Austin, TX, I’ve made the drive you’re proposing to take several times myself. Since it takes anywhere from 16-20 hours, it is best to break up the drive into two or three days, depending on which part of TX you’re coming from. Our go-to spots for this are Clovis, NM, since we have family there as well, but you might opt to stop in Carlsbad, NM, to visit the Carlsbad Caverns, or Albuquerque, NM, to visit the Acoma Pueblo, Petroglyph National Monument, Bandelier National Monument or any number of attractions in that area.
      You should definitely make reservations for hotels along your route, and for any guided tours you might wish to take. For the Antelope Canyons, a guided tour is required to visit, provided that they are open. Residents of the Navajo Reservation, where Page, AZ, slot canyons are situated, has been affected in disproportionately high numbers by COVID-19. Last I heard they were shooting for a reopen date of June 7th, but this may not happen. Should they extend the closure of their lands to visitors, that doesn’t mean you have to or should cancel your trip, you’ll just need to look to alternatives.
      Fortunately, the Horseshoe Bend overlook remains open (it never closed), and the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area/Lake Powell is reopening gradually. Face masks and other social distancing guidelines may be observed at one’s discretion. Passenger capacity on tours may indeed be reduced, which is why advance reservations remain crucial. Should the Antelope Canyons remain closed at the time of your arrival, other slot canyons in the area you might consider visiting include but are not limited to Wire Pass Canyon and/or the Buckskin Gulch near Paria, UT and Red Canyon aka Peek-a-Boo Canyon near Kanab, UT. While these do not require a guided tour, per se, it is recommended that you take one since the roads to these formations can be hazardous, and difficult to navigate for those unaccustomed to off-road driving. If you’re in a rental car, you are forbidden from driving off-road anyway.
      Waterfalls, as a general rule, tend to be kind of hard to get to. If you are planning to visit Zion National Park (which you should if at all possible!), the Upper Emerald Pools is a family-friendly hike that takes you to a three-tiered formation of waterfalls and natural ponds (unfortunately swimming is not allowed). The Weeping Rock Trail is also easy, but I’ve heard that it is closed this season due to damage from a rock slide. If you’re planning on going to the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Lower Calf Creek Falls is spectacular, but the hike to get there is kind of long (5.5 miles round-trip) and might not be suitable for young kids.
      Hope that helps! Feel free to write in again if you need to bounce more ideas off us 🙂
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

        1. Hi Ann!
          Although camping is prohibited at Horseshoe Bend itself, you’ll be happy to know there are several places to camp nearby. The closest campground is the Page/Lake Powell Campground, about 10 minutes away from Horseshoe Bend, in the town of Page, AZ. A bit further away is the Arrowhead Campground at Mystical Antelope Canyon Tours, where you can “camp” in a covered wagon, traditional Navajo hogan, or a tipi! One caveat: Arrowhead Campground is located on the Navajo Indian Reservation, which is closed to tourists until July 6th due to COVID-19, so if your visit is taking place between now and 07/06, this won’t be an option Near the entrance to the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, you’ll find the Beehives, a small first-come/first-serve campground. Within the Recreation Area, there’s Wahpweap Campground and also Lone Rock Beach, both on the shores of Lake Powell! Wahweap Campground is administered by ARAMARK/Lake Powell Resorts. Lone Rock Beach and the Beehives are operated by the National Park Service. For more information on camping in Glen Canyon, visit the National Park Service website for this area.
          I don’t recall seeing when you were planning to visit, or whether you were traveling by RV or wanting to tent camp. If you are traveling during the summer months, you might want to rethink tent camping. Summers in Page, AZ, are very hot, with daytime highs occasionally reaching over 110 degrees Fahrenheit. Nights don’t cool down much either, making tent camping a very uncomfortable proposition. If you’re RV’ing, you’ll want to choose a camping area with electrical hook-ups so you can have access to air conditioning. The Page/Lake Powell Campground and Wahweap Campground are both developed with full electrical and water hook-ups.
          If you don’t have an RV and are now re-thinking tent camping, you’ll find a diverse assortment of hotels, motels, and vacation rentals that would be much more comfortable.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  33. Hi Alley!

    I’m planning to visit the Lake Powell area, and want to check out Horseshoe Bend (while ALSO remaining safe due to the current state of the world!)
    That being said– I’m not an avid hiker, but I really want to see Horseshoe Bend from this point of view. I’ve seen mixed reviews on the hike, but it seems fairly attainable. I was wondering how long it seems to take to ‘hike’? And if there are any other sort of trails at Horseshoe Bend aside from the one pictured above?

    Also, do you have any advice on kayaking Horseshoe Bend? I’ve never kayaked before, but would be going with a friend who has. She seems very interested in the idea, as am I… but would love to hear your insight! 🙂 Thanks so much for all of this information. I’m looking forward to seeing this beautiful site in person!

    P.S.

    Do you have any recommendations for swimming holes or hikes specifically in the Lake Powell/Page/Horseshoe Bend area? <3

    1. Hi Lindsey,
      First off, you do not need to be an “avid” hiker to enjoy the trip to Horseshoe Bend. If you’re in relatively good health, you should be able to manage it. Just be sure to bring appropriate closed-toed shoes, ample sun protection, and water for yourself and your hiking party. If after considering the pros and cons, you surmise that you won’t be able to make the walk, there are other ways to see it that are less physical, although more pricey. For more information on these, visit “Help! I Can’t Make The Hike To Horseshoe Bend
      As for kayaking through Horseshoe Bend, it is possible by utilizing what’s known as a backhaul service from Lees Ferry. You can either bring your own kayak, or rent one from one of several local outfitters. You would then be motored to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, where you would transfer to your kayak and paddle down the river 15 miles back to Lees Ferry. For more information on this activity, visit http://www.kayakthecolorado.com or http://www.kayakhorseshoebend.com
      On the subject of swimming holes, you’ve got the grand-daddy of all swimming holes just minutes from Horseshoe Bend: Lake Powell! There are several nice swim beaches in the area, including The Chains, which is easily dovetailed with a hike to the Hanging Gardens area. The Wahweap Swim Beach and Lone Rock Beach are fun, too; these are both inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, meaning you have to pay an entrance fee.
      Hope that helps — good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Udi,
      Theoretically, you can picnic at the Horseshoe Bend Overlook, but to be honest, it may not be the best place for that. There are no picnic tables out there, and very little shade, and right now, daytime temperatures are starting to ratchet up above 90 degrees.
      A better place for a picnic would be near the Stateline Launch Ramp at Lake Powell. Just across the road from the Wahweap Campground is a nice picnic area, with tables and shade. And if you get hot, Lake Powell is just a short walk away for a refreshing dip. Since it is located within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, an entrance fee is required to utilize this area. If that does not appeal, the Wahweap Overlook on U.S. 89 boasts a nice view of Lake Powell (but no lake access), picnic tables and shade, and no entrance fee.
      Hope that helps!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  34. What time if day gets the sun in right place so you can get the picture above? Thank you!
    Also, can Antelope Canyon be done in the same day?

    1. Hi Meghan!
      These photos were most likely taken during the mid-day hours during winter and early spring. Depending on the time of year you’re visiting, however, you may not want to be at Horseshoe Bend at that time. If you’re coming during the hot months of summer, for example, you’ll want to be at the overlook just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Though the Colorado River may be shadowed, you will still be able to take beautiful photos!
      As to whether it’s possible to tour Antelope Canyon the same day you visit Horseshoe Bend, yes, you can — usually. Right now, the Antelope Canyons and other attractions on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands are closed due to COVID-19. They are shooting for a reopening date of mid-June, last we heard, but that could get pushed back since COVID-19 cases are occurring in disproportionately high numbers on the reservation.
      Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

      1. Miss alley i can still go through monument valley (just to see the view)main highway to get to fourcorners right?! Looks like some if my iptuon for camping are open but im going to call them to make sure I will be leaving sunday for roadtrip to colorado utah 4 corners and new mexico! I will be in horseshoe bend as well!

        1. Hi Connie,
          Although the road through Monument Valley remains accessible, the Navajo Nation asks that any visitors from outside the reservation avoid stopping in this area. To that end, all campgrounds, hotels, and other tourist-oriented businesses are closed. This includes the Four Corners Monument. The Navajo Tribe’s residents have been affected in disproportionately high numbers by COVID-19 and cannot risk accidental exposure by tourists. If for any reason you must get out of your car on reservation lands, you will be asked to wear a mask, especially if you have to patronize a business such as a gas station or convenience store. But again, with careful planning, you can avoid this.
          You are correct in that some campgrounds in the American Southwest are reopening, but others are not. Be sure to verify the status of all campgrounds you plan to stay at before assuming you’ll be able to get a space.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Shelly —
      Yes, Horseshoe Bend is open. It is one of the few attractions in the Page, AZ, area that remained open throughout the COVID-19 shutdown period. Other nearby attractions on Navajo Tribal Land such as the Antelope Canyons and Monument Valley are closed, but are shooting for a re-open date of mid-June. To be put on an e-mail list to be notified as to when that happens, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
      Glen Canyon/Lake Powell is in the midst of a “phased” reopening of facilities and activities and *fingers crossed* will be back in full swing by the time you visit!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  35. Hello! I have a few questions.
    1. What are the hours of operation?
    2. Do we buy the tickets online? If so, where and how much per person?
    3. Can we still access the river to swim?

    1. Hi Valeska,
      1. The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is open from sunrise to sunset
      2. Parking fees of $10/passenger vehicle or $35/light commercial vehicle are paid on arrival; they may not be purchased in advance
      3. You can access the Colorado River to swim at Lees Ferry, or at several access points on Lake Powell. For specific information on these, visit http://www.NPS.gov: Glen Canyon
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Michelle,
      Simply go to Google Maps and do a search on “Horseshoe Bend, Page, AZ.”
      Horseshoe Bend is located at mile marker 545 on US89. The parking lot is very well-signed and easy to find!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  36. Hello, is this trail easily done by an elderly person that usually needs a cane or walker to assist them?

    1. Hi Mark,
      The Horseshoe Bend Overlook trail is approximately .7 miles one way, therefore, you’re looking at just shy of 1.5 miles round-trip. That might be a little much for someone with mobility issues to handle.
      Sorry to be the bearer of potentially bad news on that front. Depending on when your visit is scheduled for, namely, a few months from now, you might consider one of several alternate means of visiting Horseshoe Bend that don’t involve so much physical activity. However, many of these options are on temporary hiatus due to COVID-19. For more information, check out “Help! I Can’t Do the Hike to Horseshoe Bend
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Any,
          As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area/Lake Powell will also begin a phased reopening of facilities such as lodging, restaurants, and activities as outlined on the official National Park Service website.
          Nevertheless, there are a few things you should keep in mind before committing to your trip: the Antelope Canyons, another popular attraction in Page, AZ, are closed and expect to remain so until June. There are also over 3,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and the Navajo Reservation has been hit particularly hard. They are asking that travelers avoid that area altogether if possible. In addition, many other popular attractions in the area such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley may be partially or completely closed. With all that in mind, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and personal hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

          1. Will there be roadblocks by the Navajo nation police? Are we able to drive there Friday for one day trip and leave? departing be fore 2pm.

          2. Hi Jennifer,
            This is a really good question.
            While roads through the Navajo Nation are not closed to through traffic — after all, trucks still have to get through to deliver supplies — the local police may require you to stop at any time. You may be asked to wear face masks while traveling through reservation lands, and discouraged from stopping at gas stations, trading posts, anywhere you could risk exposing local residents to COVID-19.
            We thank you in advance for complying with these guidelines. The Navajo Nation has been hit especially hard by COVID-19 and needs time and space to heal.
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

          1. Ross,
            Apologies for the delay in response to your inquiry. Hopefully you found Horseshoe Bend still open, as indicated in previous replies, and enjoyed it!
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Jasmin!
          For updates on other attractions reopening (or choosing not to), visit http://www.NPS.gov and search for your desired park by state or by name.
          From what we have been told, Grand Canyon National Park (South Rim) will reopen on a very limited basis for Memorial Day weekend.
          Glen Canyon National Recreation Area/Lake Powell also plans a phased reopening of activities and facilities, as do Zion National Park and Bryce Canyon in Utah.
          The Navajo Indian Tribe, who manage popular attractions such as the Antelope Canyons and Monument Valley, have opted to keep their reservation lands closed to visitors until further notice. They have been hit disproportionately hard by COVID-19, so we support this decision 100%.
          Hope this helps. Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  37. Is this open and if so do i have to pay?

    I am going to be driving from San Diego.

    What are the hours and will there be people there?

    1. Dear Adam,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. Collection of the usual $10/vehicle parking fee has also been temporarily suspended. The overlook is open from sunrise to sunset. People are coming to visit, but in fewer numbers than they had in the past.
      Assuming that you are planning to visit in the near future, there are a few things you should keep in mind: the Antelope Canyons, another popular attraction in Page, AZ, are closed until further notice. There are also over 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona. In addition, many other popular attractions in the area such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and personal hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

      1. Hi.. I wanted to come up this Sunday. I was wondering if you think that Mother’s day would be really busy?
        Wanted to stay with rules and guidelines and not be in crowded areas. We are driving up from Phoenix area and packing lunch to have in car and not planing on making any stops. Just going straight there and straight back. Thank you.

        1. Hi Cecilia,
          The Horseshoe Bend Overlook should be open on Mother’s Day.
          As for whether it will be busy, that remains to be seen. Nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon and the Antelope Canyons remain closed, as do other popular National and State Parks, which will begin reopening in the days and weeks after your visit.
          Another consideration is that your trip route will take you right through the Navajo Indian Reservation, whose residents have been hit disproportionately hard by COVID-19. Thus they are asking that travelers avoid that area if at all possible; if you must travel through, please don’t stop and risk exposing anyone you might meet. Bear in mind it’s also a 5-hour drive from Phoenix to Page, AZ. That’s a lot of time on the road just to go to one overlook. Don’t get me wrong, Horseshoe Bend is beautiful, and we’d love to have you visit, but perhaps another time would be better.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and personal hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley

          1. Hi Austin,
            Yes, the trail to Horseshoe Bend remains open. It’s one of a few attractions in Northern Arizona that never closed through the COVID-19 lockdown! Still, we ask that you observe social distancing and personal hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
            * Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
            * Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
            * Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
            * When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
            * Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
            * Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
            * Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
            * Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

  38. Hello, I know as of recent someone asked if the bend is still open to the public. I am curious if that is still in effect?

    1. Dear Danielle,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants.
      In light of the fact that there are over 500 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, Monument Valley, and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

          1. Hi Maria,
            As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. However, the Antelope Canyons are closed until further notice. In light of that fact, plus considering that there are over 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and many popular nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
            If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
            – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
            – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
            – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
            – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
            – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
            – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
            – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
            – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
            Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley

        1. Dear Brooke,
          As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. However, the nearby Antelope Canyons are closed until further notice. In light of that fact, plus considering that there are over 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and many other popular attractions in the area such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley

      1. Hi Brittney,
        As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants.
        In light of the fact that there are over 500 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, Monument Valley, and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
        If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
        – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
        – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
        – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
        – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
        – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
        – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
        – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
        – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley

    1. Dear Megan,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants.
      In light of the fact that there are over 500 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, Monument Valley, and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

    1. Hello Trinity,
      At the present time, Horseshoe Bend remains open to visitation. However, that status could change without notice rather quickly under the present circumstances. The one point about your inquiry that really jumps out at me, however, is your mention of camping. Camping has never been allowed at Horseshoe Bend, nor will it ever be in the foreseeable future.
      Nevertheless, we strongly encourage you to consider whether your visit is 100% necessary. What with many popular camping areas being closed to the public, the fact that there are over 400 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including some fatalities) in Northern Arizona, plus the fact that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very limited medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their respective capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

      1. Hello does it cost to park and walk to see the Horseshoe bend? Also is this something you can type in a gps or find or where could I find an exact location?

        1. Dear Tiffany,
          As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. Parking fees are $10 per standard passenger vehicle, $35 for light commercial vehicles. GPS coordinates are 36.8792° N, 111.5104° W
          In light of the fact that there are over 400 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including some fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley

    1. Hello Emily,
      As of Monday, March 30th, Horseshoe Bend remains open for visitation. However, in light of the fact that there are several confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Page, AZ, and limited medical facilities that are already stretched thin, we strongly recommend considering whether your visit is 100% necessary. If you decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of
      infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Dear Emily,
          As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open. However, in light of the fact that there are several confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including 2 fatalities) in Page, AZ, and many more in the Navajo Indian Reservation, which abuts the town of Page, AZ, we strongly recommend considering whether your visit is 100% necessary. Bear in mind that both areas have very limited medical capabilities that have already been stretched beyond their respective capacities.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of
          infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

      1. Hello Eddie,
        If you’re referring to right this minute, Horseshoe Bend remains open and visited, but not in the numbers we typically see at this time of year for obvious reasons.
        As for weather conditions, right now, the temperature is 52 degrees Fahrenheit under partly cloudy skies; later today, we’re expecting a high of 73 degrees and continued partly cloudy conditions. Page, AZ, and the East Grand Canyon vacation planning
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Jesus,
      At the present time, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that could change if determined necessary by the City of Page or the National Park Service. In the meantime, we urge you to please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face, especially after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that get touched frequently, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
      As for what else you might do while visiting Page, AZ, not a lot of activities are running due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Still, there are opportunities for self-guided sightseeing, such as hiking along the Rim View Trail, and visiting the White House or Wahweap Overlooks. Glen Canyon National Recreation Area technically remains open, but services available will be extremely limited. No hotels, restuarants, stores, etc. If you do visit this area, be prepared to bring your own food and drinks.
      Better yet, as much as I hate to say it, stay home. Page, AZ, is a rural community with very limited health care services. We would hate to see you fall ill and not get the quality of care you may get at home, or worse yet, to have you unknowingly give the virus to people who live here.
      Good luck and safe travels, I know it’s a hard choice.
      Alley 🙂

  39. I was just informed the Page terminal is closing, where I had a tour booked. Will the bend also be closed? I don’t want to make the drive to find that both are not open.

    Thanks!

    1. Hi Jonnathan,
      At the present time, Horseshoe Bend remains open to visitors. However, that status could change at the drop of a hat, as I’m sure you’ve found out.
      For the time being, for your health and safety, and that of your families, please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face, especially after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that get touched frequently, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
      For current information regarding potential closure(s), I would recommend monitoring these websites:
      LakePowellLife.com, website of the local radio station in Page, AZ, and
      The Lake Powell Chronicle, Page, AZ’s local newspaper
      The City of Page, who oversee the parking lot at Horseshoe Bend
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Doug,
          Horseshoe Bend is open as of today. For obvious reasons, we urge you to please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face, especially after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that get touched frequently, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Justin,
      Sorry to be late in response to your inquiry.
      For those asking the same question, at this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open for visitation. For your health and safety, and that of your families, please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that are frequently handled, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Abby,
      You are correct that Antelope Canyon tours have temporarily been suspended due to COVID-19. We support this decision 100% since slot canyons are a confined space. I certainly wouldn’t want to be in one with a contagious virus floating around.
      Horseshoe Bend, on the other hand, is one of the Southwest’s world famous wide open spaces, which, at the moment, is open for business. We simply ask that you practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that are frequently handled, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  40. When searching Horse Shoe Bend on Google, many photos appear where people are standing dangerously close to the edge. Is there enough margin for the tourists to see the Horse Shoe Bend from a reliable distance? A person might slip and fall towards the canyon, also another tourist might slip or stumble behind another person. Also, photographic equipment might drop or something like that when another person is walking. The canyon is amazingly beautiful, but it doesn’t seem like there’s a solid margin policy or supervision in place. Maybe same discussion for other locations in Arizona.

    1. Hello Jill,
      A small platform with a safety railing was installed at Horseshoe Bend last year. Unfortunately, that doesn’t stop people from being careless or doing things they shouldn’t. Besides, if the entire overlook was to be fenced in, environmentalists would have a screaming fit. The National Park Service or the City of Page assume no responsibility for loss of property or personal injuries sustained during one’s visit to Horseshoe Bend. It is up to each individual to keep themselves and other members of their traveling party safe at Horseshoe Bend, the Grand Canyon, and other potentially precarious locations throughout the American Southwest.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. There is a section to the slight left of center that has a guardrail now. The direct center views have no guardrail. I was there last week and many young folks were making stupid and dangerous selfies and photos perched at the end of rocks over the 1000 foot drop. Just dumb. Folks have died there doing stupid stuff. If you are wary of the open edge, stick to the guardrail area, you can still make a great shot from there.

      1. Gerald,
        It’s impossible to regulate stupidity, but if they tried to fence in the entire overlook, the environmentalists would have had a screaming fit. They flapped around enough when the current safety railing was installed.
        As Ricky Nelson once said, “you can’t please everyone, so you’ve got to please yourself.
        Cheers,
        Alley 🙂

  41. Hey! I am planning a trip in late May and will be staying in Sedona. Do you think it’s possible to drive up to Page, do an Antelope Canyon Tour and the Horse shoe Bend hike in one day? Hoping to head back to Sedona after the said activities.
    Thanks!

    1. Hey Mary!
      The drive from Sedona to Page, AZ, takes approximately 3 hours — wheels turning, no stops. That rarely happens as the drive is very scenic and you will be stopping to take pictures more often than you realize, so don’t be surprised if it ends up taking longer. Therefore, lighting out of Sedona right at sunrise is strongly advised. During the month of May, sunrise occurs at around 5:15 AM. Touring one segment of Antelope Canyon will take anywhere from 2-2.5 hours; that’s factoring in advance check-in time, logistics of getting to your departure point, and delays that may occur due to the inevitable “bottlenecking” that tends to take place as the day goes on. The hike to Horseshoe Bend typically takes 60-90 minutes, but to be on the safe side, tack another 30 minutes onto that timeframe in order to sort out parking.
      At some point, you’ll probably want to grab some lunch, which will take another 1-2 hours depending on whether you choose to get a quick bite at a fast food place, or a sit-down meal. In the area of Antelope Canyon, there aren’t many restaurants, but the Deli at Big Lake Trading Post makes good sandwiches, which you can get to-go. If you prefer a sit-down meal, you’ll find a variety of restaurants serving different types of cuisine in the town of Page, AZ.
      In May, sunset occurs at roughly 7:30 PM, so be sure you leave Page, AZ, no later than 4:30 PM. You don’t want to do any driving in Northern Arizona in the dark, particularly the stretch of US89A through Oak Creek Canyon. It’s a very narrow, twisty road that’s very dimly lit, and may be populated by deer, elk, and other wildlife.
      Long story short, yes, you can pull of an Antelope Canyon tour (which must be reserved in advance) and a visit to Horseshoe Bend as a day trip from Sedona. If you’re not locked into room reservations in Sedona, however, do consider staying overnight in Page, AZ. That will make for a much more relaxed experience, and allow you to visit Horseshoe Bend at the best time of day, when temperatures are cooler and parking is easier: just after sunrise on your way back to Sedona.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. I am currently on Said trip. My wife and I found that staying in Sedona to visit a few areas and do Phoenix. We stopped by Grand canyon for a weekend and then decided to stay here in page to do horseshoe bend, rainbow bridge and antelope canyon.

    3. Do the Antelope Canyon first as you have to reserve a tour (Navajo guided tours are the only way to see either Upper or Lower Antelope Canyon). I went last May and the tours were crowded so reserve your time and whether you want an Upper or Lower Antelope Canyon tour in advance. Then you can go the ten minute drive over to the parking lot for the Horseshoe Bend. The walk in is about 8/10 of a mile each way from the parking lot, more downhill to the bend, then mostly uphill back to the parking lot. There are two shaded places to stop, sit and rest along the walk, if you need a break. Horseshoe Bend needs no reservation. People go there from sunrise to sunset. If you are into photography, there are sites that show you what the bend looks like at different times of day, with the different directions of light. The Bend faces west. I have done both and yes they could be done in the same day and then head back to Sedona. It could be a very long and physical day but not too much if you are reasonably fit, just start out early. Both are stunning and well worth the effort. Cheers

  42. Hi, what time do you recommend getting to the parking lot by if you want to be the first ones there during sunrise? Also, how much time do you need to see Horseshoe Bend? We’re coming in May and we also want to check out lower Antelope Canyon the same day. Thank you

    1. Hi Samreen,
      The Horseshoe Bend parking lot is open from dawn to dusk year-round. In May, sunrise occurs at approximately 5:15 AM (for exact time on your specific travel date visit http://www.sunrise-sunset.org). Therefore, it would be a good idea to be ready to enter the parking lot approximately 15 minutes beforehand. It is suggested that you allow 60-90 minutes to walk to the overlook, take photos, then walk back to the parking lot.
      Be sure that you make advance reservations for your Antelope Canyon tour.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Samreen,
          A small number of Page, AZ, tour companies go to Horseshoe Bend: Horseshoe Bend Tours, who offer a shuttle service to Horseshoe Bend via a private entrance on Native American Land. You can also bundle a trip to the overlook with a tour to Secret Antelope Canyon. For more information on these, visit http://www.HorseshoeBendTours.com
          Another option, if you wish to tour the Lower segment of Antelope Canyon, is to take the Lower Antelope/Horseshoe Bend combination tour with Dixie Ellis. For more information, visit http://www.antelopelowercanyon.com
          Take care,
          Alley 🙂

  43. Hi, I’m going to be out in Page in late April. I know the pay station closes at sun set, but how late are you allowed to be there after sun set and will they let you know at the booth if the lot is full?
    Thanks

    1. Hi Jon,
      You won’t be allowed to stay for very long past sunset, so if you were hoping to get some “star photography,” that won’t be possible at the present time.
      In the event the parking lot is full at the time of your arrival, you will be informed somehow, whether by signage, or by the entrance gate staff personally.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. They close the parking lot entrance gate after sunset, but if you are already in you can stay a bit past sunset. But the Bend is not lighted, and most of the edge is without any railings, so venture there at your own risk without any light. You can see yourself as you drive up if the lot is full or not.

      1. Gerald,
        That’s excellent advice! Sunset visitors may wish to carry flashlights or headlamps for their personal safety.
        Alley 🙂

  44. Hi Alley, Your page has a lot of information which I appreciate. I just watched a video shot last week saying you cannot get into the parking lot of Horseshoe Bend until after sunrise. Is this true?

    1. Hi Deb,
      At present, “dawn to dusk” are the official operating hours of the Horseshoe Bend parking lot, according to the City of Page. This means you wouldn’t be able to be at the overlook prior to sunrise. Since you are not alone in wanting to visit Horseshoe Bend before “actual” sunrise, I would recommend contacting the City office Economic Development and Tourism to voice your concerns. They can be reached at (928) 645-4310.
      Sorry I couldn’t be more helpful at this time,
      Alley

    1. Hi Robert,
      Yes, dogs are allowed, as long as they are on leash, and you pick up after them.
      During the summer months, you may wish to put booties on your dog’s paws since the sand gets very hot!
      Alley 🙂

  45. Hello Alley!
    We are going to page in the middle of February. I wanted to know how normally is the weather there during that time of the year. (To know what kind of clothes I need to wear for the hike) Also I would like to know your personal opinion about what canyon is better to visit; (In February)the upper or the lower? I will have just one day in Page arriving at noon and leaving around 8pm. My plan is to visit the best part of the antelope canyon and horseshoe bend. I was planing to visit the bend around 5 pm, is that too late? Thank you for all the information in this page and all your comments 🙂

    1. Hi Fernanda!
      In February, you will need to be prepared for cooler weather, and conditions that can range from sunny and brisk to rain and/or snow. Pack jackets, gloves, etc. just in case, and in general, dress in layers that you can easily remove and stash in a backpack or your vehicle.
      As for which canyon is better to visit, that’s a hard one, as you can imagine – they’re all gorgeous! 😉 However, if everyone in your party is physically fit and able to handle a few stairs, ladders, and small boulders, Lower Antelope Canyon would be a good choice. To judge whether this would be a safe and enjoyable activity for all members of your party, watch this full video walk-through of Lower Antelope Canyon on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
      Regarding whether 5:00 PM is too late to visit Horseshoe Bend, it shouldn’t be. The parking lot at the overlook is open from dawn to dusk, and sunset occurs at about 6:00 PM in February. However, be prepared to share the area with a lot of people. Sunset is a popular time of day to be there!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. Weather is cool in the morning 10-30 degrees Fahrenheit but can heat up to the 40-60’s in the afternoon. Bring layers and gloves. I prefer the lower canyon the light is better that time of year because of the shape of the canyon so it is easier to take better pictures it is also more family friendly because there are restrooms and a snack bar and shop on site. The Upper canton is beautiful as well but much darker especially in winter and harder to get good photos. There is also no restroom so it can be challenging for some especially kids. Horseshoe Bend is best in the afternoon before 3 in my opinion it is less crowded then sunset.

      1. Hey Josie,
        Thank you for your input and assistance to Fernanda 🙂 We always love it when the public gets involved.
        Alley 🙂

  46. Hello there! We will be bringing a school group up to Horseshoe Bend in March and are trying to figure out the best time of day to come.
    It will be a Wednesday morning and we have an Antelope Canyon tour booked for 8:45am, so we will arrive at Horseshoe Bend a little later in the morning-most likely around 10:30/11:00. If the bus is unable to find parking, it is possible to pay the bus entrance fee, unload the students, and have the bus go back to our hotel to park until pickup? Or, is there another solution folks have used before?
    Thank you!

    1. Hi Ellyse,
      Doing what you describe is not allowed. There is no parking along US89, and the speed limit there is 65 MP. According to the City of Page, who manages the Horseshoe Bend parking lot, they have “passed an emergency ordinance prohibiting passenger drop-offs and pickups at the Horseshoe Bend entrance or along the Highway 89 corridor.”
      Since you are touring Antelope Canyon at 8:45 AM, I assume you will be staying overnight in Page the night prior. If so, my suggestion would be to arrive at the Horseshoe Bend parking lot right at sunrise, which is at approximately 6:30 AM in March. You should allow approximately 90 minutes to walk out to the overlook, take photos, and walk back. Depending on who you are touring Antelope Canyon with, you will be required to check in for your tour 30-60 minutes prior to departure, so make sure everyone is back on the bus in time to drive to your tour company’s designated departure location, which is typically a 10-15 minute drive from Horseshoe Bend.
      If the above suggestion does not appeal or is not convenient to your group’s schedule, you are welcome to take your chances visiting the overlook after our Antelope Canyon tour, but we can’t guarantee that you’ll be able to find parking right away. Since that time frame is Spring Break, which I assume is your reason for visiting as well, things will be busy.
      Good luck and safe travels. Sorry I couldn’t be more helpful on this issue.
      Alley

  47. We are planning a family trip from Denver to Mesa Verde to Four Corners, Monument Valley and then to Horseshoe Bend while staying the night in Page, AZ. What if we can’t see Horseshoe Bend in the afternoon on that same day? Silly question, but can we see it in the late evening before the sun goes down, or first thing the next morning? Are there restricted park hours?

    Also, if we do a tour of Antelope Canyon, are we guaranteed to see Horseshoe Bend?

    Thanks,
    Lyndsi

    1. Hi Lyndsi,
      No such thing as a silly question here 😉
      Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon are two separate areas, approximately 10 miles apart from one another. Therefore taking a tour of the latter, doesn’t guarantee that you’ll be able to visit the former, unless you take a tour that expressly includes the two attractions.
      Unfortunately, late afternoon and sunset are the busiest times of day at the Horseshoe Bend Overlook. Lots of day trippers out and about then. You stand a better chance of visiting it with minimal hassle if you plan to hit it just after sunrise. Since you are staying overnight in Page, AZ, you have that option!
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  48. Hi Alley,

    How is the wheelchair accessible path coming along. I have a heavy duty power chair that goes up and down the beach but occasionally struggles in the soft sand. I’m considering a trip to Page over President’s Day and I’m wondering if I should try Horseshoe Bend in my power chair.

    Ray

    1. Hey Ray,
      Sorry to say, they’re still working on it. I wouldn’t try taking your power scooter on the trail as it stands.
      If you are able to walk a short distance, you might consider going to Horseshoe Bend with Horseshoe Bend Tours. They offer shuttle service to a private area of the overlook where the walk is only 200 yards. They do not have the ability to carry wheelchairs or scooters, unfortunately, so you’d have to get on and off the tour vehicle under your own steam.
      Sorry to be the bearer of bad news on that front,
      Alley

    1. Hi Missy,
      The hike to Horseshoe Bend is 1.2 miles round trip, and rated as “easy” on AllTrails.com. In other words, most people in reasonably good health can handle it. It does have a few uphill/downhill sections, and after a prolonged spell of dry weather, the trail currently being used can be sandy (they are working on a more level paved trail, which should be complete by next summer). If you have any doubts about your ability to make the walk, or that of anyone else in your party, read “Help! I Can’t Make the Hike To Horseshoe Bend” for suggestions on alternate ways of including it in your vacation.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  49. Hi, I was wondering if I can come in really early like 5am to hopefully catch some astrophotography at the horseshoe bend. Is this possible?

    1. Hi Quiolo,
      It depends on when you were planning to visit. The main parking lot at Horseshoe Bend is open between dawn and dusk. If your trip is planned for sometime in the next couple of months, that means the pay stations won’t be open until 6:30 AM – 7:30 PM, so you wouldn’t technically be able to get to the overlook before then. If you find that to be the case, there are other areas you might consider for doing some star photography, such as the Glen Canyon Dam Overlook, aka the “White House” Overlook, the Wahweap Overlook, just past the Dam on US89 as you head toward Kanab, UT; or Alstrom Point, near the town of Big Water, UT, which is best visited with a licensed guide for safety.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  50. Hi Alley,

    I will be visiting with 5 others and we will be driving a Class C (with a small car in tow) to Horseshoe Bend, do you know what the parking cost would be for this type of vehicle? Thanks!! 🙂

    1. Hi Helen,
      According to the information we last received, a class C motorhome qualifies as a light commercial vehicle, so your one-time parking rate should be $35. Since you’ll be towing a car, I would strongly advise you to try and visit Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning when the parking lot opens so you can find a pull-through space, or a reasonable facsimile thereof.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  51. Is there much snow in January? I know to expect colder temperatures but do you have snow around this time of the year! Thanks for your response!

    1. Hi Jessica,
      Page, AZ, is 4,100′ above sea level, and as such, typically doesn’t receive heavy snowfalls. In the rare instance when we get 6″ or more, it tends to melt off fairly quick. However, in other areas around Page, AZ, like the Grand Canyon, Bryce, and Zion, it’s not uncommon for there to be a lot of snow during the winter months. Whether that willl be the case when you visit is difficult to predict as you might imagine, so start keeping an eye on local weather about 2-3 weeks before you get set to travel. Page, AZ, weather
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  52. Hi Alley,

    If I have the America the Beautiful Passes, do I still need to pay entrance fees for Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon? My vehicle is a Dodge Grand Caravan, about 17 feet in length. What would be the entrance fees for my vehicle and for how long can I park it? Thank you!

    1. Hi Anson,
      Unfortunately, your America The Beautiful Pass will not work for either Horseshoe Bend or Antelope Canyon.
      Antelope Canyon is a Native American Tribal Park, therefore separate from the National Park system. Your Tribal Park entrance fee is usually included in your Antelope Canyon tour price.
      Horseshoe Bend is now administered as a municipal park by the City of Page, AZ. The one-time parking fee for passenger vehicles is $10. The typical visit for Horseshoe Bend is 90 minutes-2 hours.
      Hope that helps. Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year!
      Alley 🙂

  53. Good afternoon,

    My friends and I can to hike horseshoe bend on Feb 18, 2020 in the afternoon. We have a reservation for Upper Antelope Canyon at 4:15. Do we need to make a reservation for horseshoe bend?

    Thank you,

    Devin

    1. Hi Devin!
      You do not need to make a reservation to visit the Horseshoe Bend Overlook. The parking lot is open between dawn and dusk. A one-time parking fee of $10 for standard passenger vehicles or $35 for light commercial vehicles is required. Allow for ~90 minutes to park, walk out to the overlook, take photos, and walk back to your vehicle. You then should allow ~30 minutes to travel from Horseshoe Bend to your Antelope Canyon tour outfitter’s departure location. Depending on which tour company you’re traveling with, they will want you to check in anywhere from 30-60 minutes prior to your actual tour departure.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  54. I recently watched a YouTube video of Horsehoe Bend and noticed a sign, and if I’m interpreting it correctly says no work boot type sole allowed on the trail. Are there specific shoes, boots not allowed on the hike?

    1. Hi Curt, and thank you for this excellent question.
      Technically, you can wear whatever kind of shoes you’re comfortable with to hike to Horseshoe Bend. That doesn’t mean you should attempt the hike in 6″ stiletto heels or flip-flops. Heavy work boots may also be discouraged as the wearer may inadvertently do damage to fragile rock formations or crypto-biotic soils if they happen to wander off the established trail.
      Trail runners, tennis shoes, and hiking boots should be fine as these are enclosed and will give your feet the support and protection they need.
      Hope that helps. Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year!
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Shawna!
      Is the hike to Horseshoe Bend doable with a 5-year-old? That kind of depends on your 5-year-old!
      Many young children are able to make it to the Horseshoe Bend overlook faster than their parents can, but parents should exercise their right to restrain kids’ enthusiasm since the majority of the overlook is unfenced and it’s a 700′ drop to the river. Other kids may struggle a bit, particularly if the sand on the trail is dry and deep. The good news is, you’re not limited to a certain timeframe in order to get to the overlook and back safely. Take all the time you need for everyone to enjoy it, and observe the beauty of the terrain around you.
      Be sure to bring water and dress warmly as January temperatures are on the cooler side. If, for some reason, you discover that your child, or anyone else in your party is not able to make the walk, read this piece on alternate ways of seeing Horseshoe Bend.
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year!
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Sven,
      Yes, a one-time entrance fee of $10 per passenger car or $35 for light commercial vehicles such as Ford Transit, Chevy Express vans, etc. is now required for visiting Horseshoe Bend.
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
      Alley 🙂

  55. It was great experience to visit horseshoe bend and grand canyon. The most beautiful scenic area, natural beauty and heat touching spiritual atmosphere. This page is very informative for those people having plans to visit this unique and wonder of the world. Please read this page before to final your trip. You will enjoy and discover much more.
    Noor Jarral

    1. Dear Noor,
      Thank you so much for your positive feedback. We hope you get a chance to return to our area. In the meantime, enjoy the rest of your summer, and 2019!
      Best regards,
      Alley 🙂

  56. Is it possible to tour antelope canyon, horse show bend and lake Powell in 1 day? And if so what would be the best order of visit coming from Page. Thanks

    1. Hi Tricia,
      Since all 3 of these attractions in Page, AZ are relatively close to one another, they can be visited in one day, and order in which you visit them in doesn’t matter a whole lot. What will probably be the key determining factor on that is availability of Antelope Canyon tours. Antelope Canyon is located on Navajo Indian Tribal land, so a guided tour is 100% necessary in order to tour it. Tours book up fast, so start researching your options, decide whether you want to tour Lower Antelope or Upper Antelope, book a tour at a time that works for you, then plan the rest of your visit around it. Book A Tour Of Antelope Canyon
      Horseshoe Bend is open 24/7, so you can visit it whenever you wish. During the warmer months of summer and early fall, just after sunrise is a good time in order to avoid the excessive heat of mid-day.
      To visit Lake Powell, you have a choice of entering at Antelope Point Marina, which is near Antelope Canyon, or the Lake Powell Resort and Marina entrance, which is just across the Glen Canyon Dam as you head from Page, AZ toward Kanab, UT. Lone Rock Beach is another option, which is a short distance West of the small community of Greenehaven, AZ just before you cross the Utah border. In all cases, you will need to pay the $25/vehicle entrance fee, which is good for one week’s time. If you prefer not to deal with that, The Chains is a public beach type area located outside the Federal Fee Area boundary, but it’s quite the hike to actually get down to the lake from the parking area due to the current water level.

      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  57. Hi! I want to visit this spot (Horseshoe Bend, the photo I am watching here) on this Thursday (June 22) around 3-4 PM. I wonder if I should make a reservation to get into this point that people take photos. We will drive from Las Vegas to get here. Can we just get here by car / on foot after parking?

    1. Mr. Kwon,
      Thank you for your visit and you question.
      You do not need reservations to visit Horseshoe Bend. You are free to visit whenever you wish, including the spot you see people taking photos from. Once you park your vehicle in the very well-signed parking lot, it’s a 3/4 mile hike to the overlook. Be aware that your visit is occurring in peak summer heat, so bring water and wear a hat and sunscreen.
      If you would prefer to have the knowledge and expertise that only a tour guide can provide, consider visiting the Horseshoe Bend Overlook as an add-on to a Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon Tour. https://horseshoebend.com/horseshoe-bend-slot-canyon-tour/#
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Jeremy,
      Yes, pets are welcome at the Horseshoe Bend Overlook. Since there are no guardrails, plus it’s a 500’+ drop to the river, you must be sure that they are leashed at all times. Also, be sure to bring a plastic bag or two to pack out any waste if needed, and bring plenty of water for both of you!
      Alley

  58. alley, do you have the exact address to the horseshoe bend? will it show in the navigation?
    how far from the holiday inn and suites at page,az? thanks

    1. Hi CT,
      The Horseshoe Bend Overlook is located just 5 miles South of Page, AZ at Mile Marker 545 on US89. It is clearly signed and should be quite easy to find. It should take no more than 10-15 minutes to drive there from Holiday Inn & Suites.

      Happy traveling!
      Alley

  59. Hello! My family (Dad, Mom, Sister, and I) are visiting beginning of September (during labor day weekend). We wanted to book a tour with you guys for Horseshoe Bend & Antelope Canyon; however, I saw that you guys pick up only from Sedona? We’re planning on staying in Lake Powell area, so it’s closer to the actual canyons. Do you guys pick up from there? Would that be a different price? I would love to get options! Thank you so much! 🙂

    1. Hello Sing, thank you for visiting our site.
      The tour out of Sedona is by no means the only way to visit Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend. Since you are planning on staying in Page/Lake Powell anyway, you can take a tour to Antelope Canyon directly from there. 3 tour companies pick up in the town of Page; you also have the option of driving to the Tribal Park Entrance on Highway 98 (about 5-10 minutes drive from Page) and going to the canyon from there. Whichever way you choose to go will cost the same, and tour duration will be comparable as well. Visit AntelopeCanyon.az for more information.
      Horseshoe Bend can be visited on your own. There is no charge for entry at the present time. Just after sunrise or just prior to sunset is generally regarded as the best time to view it.
      Thanks again and happy travels,
      Alley

  60. This is a photo I took and almost lost my life for. Don’t try this at the rim like I did..to close for fun.
    I was sitting on the edge about 3 feet back of the rim. I had my camera on the end of my tripod and the release in my hand. I took the shot and just as I did this big chunk of sandstone broke loose. Holy S..t !!
    I was quick enough to put my boots into the dirt and stop my sliding while still hanging on to my gear.
    We went in before dawn so I didn’t see the warning sign.
    Someone was looking out for me that day.
    Enjoy.

    1. Hi Scott – an important and timely cautionary tale. The rest of you, take heed: If in doubt, leave it out!

    1. Hi Lexi,
      This is a wonderful question!
      Yes, you can get married at Horseshoe Bend, and many people have. However, since it’s part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and thus overseen by the National Park Service, you may be required to get a permit for your wedding. Cordoning off the overlook just for your ceremony is not allowed. Your activity shouldn’t disrupt other visitors’ ability to enjoy the overlook. “The smaller, the better” is the way to go. For more information on National Park permit guidelines, click here ->: https://www.mylakepowellwedding.com/Lake_Powell_Wedding_Ceremony_S/Horseshoe_Bend_Wedding/horseshoe_bend_wedding.html
      If you’re wanting to have something a little more elaborate, with friends, family, photographers, etc., visit this site for other ideas for wedding sites and venues in Page and Lake Powell ->: https://www.myarizonaguideweddings.com/html/lake_powell_wedding_sites.html
      Good luck and congratulations on your upcoming nuptials!
      Alley

  61. Hi! Do I need to book a tour to visit Horseshoe Bend or can I do it on my own? I am planning on doing a tour of Lower Antelope the same day do you think there is enough time? Thanks!

    1. Hi Val, and thank you for visiting our site!
      Horseshoe Bend can be visited on your own, any time of day, though we wouldn’t recommend visiting at night — it’s a long drop to the river!
      You can easily visit Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon in one day. Lower Antelope Canyon is located approximately 7 miles East of Horseshoe Bend Overlook. Be sure to allow 90 minutes to 2 hours to enjoy each attraction. You’ll want to take lots of photos. Remember that you must visit Antelope Canyon with an authorized Navajo guide. Visit this page for more information ->: http://www.antelopecanyon.az/how-to-book-a-tour-for-antelope-canyon/
      Have a wonderful visit to Page!
      Alley

      1. Hi Alley,
        I have a question regarding parking. If I come in May (the date I have in mind has a sunset time at 7:15 pm) one afternoon right before the sunset, can I use the same parking sticker to return the very next morning for the sunrise visit (5:33 am)? Thank you for your time!

        1. Hey Jim,
          Sorry to be the bearer of bad news in this regard, but according to the City of Page, who oversee the Horseshoe Bend parking lot, the $10/vehicle parking fee is a one-time fee. Therefore, if you were to revisit the overlook, you would have to pay the entrance fee again — theoretically, anyway. When you visit the overlook, you might ask the staff of the entrance gate if you can re-use your entrance fee receipt to visit Horseshoe Bend overlook a second time. I can’t guarantee this will work, but it never hurts to ask.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

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