24 Hours in Page, Arizona


“What a difference a day makes?” If that day happens to include 24 hours in Page, Arizona, that difference will be a deeper understanding and appreciation of the power, complexity and artistry of an incredible force of nature known as the Colorado River.

If you’re coming to Page from Grand Canyon South Rim (which most of you will be doing), you’ve already gotten a sense of what wind and water erosion can accomplish, albeit in a somewhat abstract sense. From Grand Canyon Village and nearby vantage points, views of the river tend to be from far away, but as you proceed East on the Desert View Drive toward the park boundary, opportunities to get a better glimpse of it present themselves at places like Grandview Point, Moran Point, Lipan Point and from the top of the Desert View Watchtower.

Upon exiting the park, you are now on Navajo Indian Tribal Land, in an area loosely known as “Grand Canyon East.” A stop at the Little Colorado River Overlook reveals where two rivers join as they continue on course toward the Pacific Ocean. This confluence, known as the “sipapu,” is a sacred place to the local Hopi Indians, and is regarded as the portal through which the human race emerged from the underworld to walk the Earth.  

Continuing East to the junction of AZ64 and US89, a stop at the Cameron Trading Post is a definite must, if not for a quick bathroom break/leg stretch, for a delicious meal of their signature Navajo Tacos and perhaps a bit of souvenir shopping. Ask to visit the gallery to view some of their higher-end collectibles, such as jewelry, pottery, paintings and sculpture.

As you proceed North on US89 toward Page, the river falls mostly out of view until you turn East at Bitter Springs and start the climb to Manson Mesa. Be sure to stop at the well-marked pull-out before entering “The Cut” to view the gorge as the river dramatically cuts its way through the plateau and winds its way toward the Grand Canyon.

Getting back in your car and heading North once more, the town of Page, Arizona begins to come into view. Here, you should start looking for mile marker 545 and the sign for the Horseshoe Bend Overlook. This incised meander of the Colorado River offers perhaps the most “up-close-and-personal” view possible from a rimside vantage point. Small wonder that it’s risen from an obscure afterthought to world-famous icon status in relatively short order. Allow two hours to enjoy the overlook, including the 1.2 mile round-trip walk from the parking area. If anyone in your party has mobility issues, allow more time to complete the walk.


During the summer months when temperatures routinely exceed 100°F, this activity should be scheduled for the following morning.


Time permitting, after visiting Horseshoe Bend Overlook, other activities well worth your time include:  

  • Visiting the John Wesley Powell Memorial Museum
  • Touring the Glen Canyon Dam
  • Visiting the White House Overlook
  • Entering the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and taking the scenic Lakeshore Drive to the Lake Powell Resort complex
  • Taking a short boat tour on Lake Powell

Check in at your hotel, get some dinner, spend the rest of your evening relaxing.


The following day, after a good breakfast, tour Antelope Slot Canyon. There are two branches of the main section of Antelope Canyon, Upper and Lower. At 100 yards in length and a mostly flat trail, Upper Antelope Canyon is the easier of the two sections, manageable for most people, even those with mild mobility issues. Lower Antelope Canyon is the more physical of the two, requiring some stair climbing and light bouldering. Individuals reliant upon wheelchairs, walkers or other mobility aids will not be able to manage this section of the canyon. Due to the rapidly rising popularity of Antelope Canyon tours, reservations are an absolute must. These must be made well in advance of your arrival in Page. If you find that Antelope Canyon tours are sold out, consider touring alternate slot canyons that are just as scenic, but far less crowded, including some lesser-known drainages of Antelope Canyon.


If you manage to tour Antelope Canyon early enough, you might also be able to squeeze in some more sightseeing, including:

  • The Glen Canyon Half-Day Float Trip
  • A stand-up paddleboard or kayak tour of Lake Powell
  • Lunch at Antelope Point Marina
  • A scenic plane or helicopter flight over Lake Powell

If your schedule dictates that you must move on to your next destination, consider stopping at these “bonus” attractions between Page and Kanab, UT:

  • The “New Wave”
  • The Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Visitors Center in Big Water
  • The Paria Rimrocks/Toadstools Trail

Naturally, if you’re visiting Page from Zion or Bryce on your loop through the Grand Circle, the order in which you partake of the above activities can be flip-flopped to suit your itinerary. Still, don’t be surprised if you find that 24 hours in Page, Arizona is just enough to whet your appetite but not enough to satisfy your hunger for jaw-dropping scenery and family-friendly fun. Page, Arizona offers so many ways to play, so why not stay another day?

 

197 Responses

  1. Hi Alley,
    Me and my friend will visit PAGE on Nov.12 only from 2:30PM to 7:00PM.
    We’d like to visit horseshoe bend just to take one picture from the top, and do the kayak at anthelope.
    Questions.. 1. Can we just go with navi or map to horseshoe bend and pay at there for admission? and how long time will be taken?
    2. I know upper of anthelope is easier, but is that less beautiful or similar? and how long would be take with kayak?
    3. Is it better to book for guide? if so, could you recommend?

    1. Hi Kelly,
      First of all, kayaking in any part of Lake Powell won’t be practical at the time of year you’re visiting. Most kayak rental and tour outlets are on seasonal hiatus in November because that time of year is cold, and not very pleasant for being on the water.
      You need to be prepared to tour Antelope Canyon on foot. As for what section is more beautiful, they all are. Upper is the easier walk (aside from the network of catwalks recently installed from the exit of the canyon to the tour vehicle parking area), but if you’re in shape to manage a few stairs, ladders, small boulders, and a longer walk, you might consider touring Lower Antelope. For Antelope Canyon, a guided tour is 100% necessary, and strongly advised to book in advance. For more information on Antelope Canyon tours, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
      For Horseshoe Bend, it is relatively easy to find your way with your preferred navigational app or Google maps. It is located at mile marker 545 on US89, about 5 miles South of Page, AZ. You pay the admission ($10/standard passenger vehicles, $35/light commercial vehicles) on site. We recommend you allot 90 minutes to 2 hours to park, walk to the rim, take photos, and walk back to your vehicle.
      One last concern: you mention visiting page from 2:30 PM – 7:00 PM. On November 12th, sunset occurs at around 5:15 PM. I don’t know what your plans are after that, but you should consider staying overnight in Page, AZ. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, other wildlife and livestock animals that could elevate your risk of a collision. Trust me, that’s not something you want to experience in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
      If you have further questions, please contact us directly at [email protected]
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  2. HI Alley, I really need your help! We are planning a family trip to Arizona and New Mexico for the week between Christmas and New Years. I know it is not the ideal time of year to visit, but we can’t at another time and we would love to go to that area. We are planning on spending two full days in Lake Powell 12/28 and 12/29 but can’t seem to find a company that provides boat tours to Lake Powell. The Lake Powell Resort tours will be closed that week, and can’t seem to find another one close to Page. All of them seem to linked to them. Thank you!

    1. Hi Pamela,
      Although Lake Powell Resorts isn’t the only “game in town” when it comes to boating activities (there’s also Antelope Canyon Boat Tours, and a number of licensed fishing charter and kayak tour operators), the key factor in the difficulty you’re experiencing is the time of year. The timeframe around Christmas and New Year’s is not a good time for any type of water-based activity, mainly because it’s cold. Water temperature in Lake Powell runs between 45-50 degrees that time of year, and air temperatures Wind, snow, and rain, can also factor in, ratcheting up the risk of an accident, or God forbid, your boat capsizing. Trust me, I’ve seen it happen with all sizes of boats that time of year!
      If you have your heart set on doing some kind of boating activity on Lake Powell, the best recommendation I can give you is to inquire about a private charter through Lake Powell Resorts. This must be done by phone at 928-645-1027. Even though you might not be into fishing per se, one of the local fishing charter companies might be willing to take you out for a short excursion. Fish do bite at that time of year (I know, I’ve caught some!), and who knows, you might get into the action, too! As mentioned before, there are several companies that offer fishing charters, but the one I’m most familiar with is McNabb’s Guide Service (I know the owner personally). An Arizona fishing license is required, which can be purchased locally. If interested, give them a call at 928-660-1020 or 928-645-5122. If you call either place and they flat-out refuse to take you out at the time of year you’re visiting, heed their advice. These are experienced, and in some cases, US Coast Guard Certified boat captains who know the lake, and the potential hazards of winter.
      The good news is that you can enjoy nice views of Lake Powell simply by driving into the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (a $30/vehicle entrance fee [good for one week’s time] or the National Park Pass is required). The scenic Lake Shore Drive, as the name suggests parallels the shoreline of Lake Powell for a good distance. You can also get out and explore at the Lake Powell Resort complex, or go a bit further up the road and take the trail from the picnic area to an area called the Coves.
      Another way to get some great views of Lake Powell without forking out $30 is to walk the Page Rim View Trail. The trailhead is near one of the local elementary schools and encircles Manson Mesa, which the townsite is built on. Though the trail is ~10 miles long, you needn’t commit to the “whole enchilada.” There are several spur trails that will take you back to civilization should a shorter walk be desired. Although the views of the Lake are very nice from this trail, there is no lake access. You might also consider stopping at the Wahweap Overlook, which also doesn’t require any sort of entrance fee, but offers spectacular views of Lake Powell. Bear in mind that there is no water available at either of these locations, so you’ll need to bring your own.
      Last but not least, if you have the budget for it, the absolute best way to get a true sense of Lake Powell’s size, scope, and complexity, is to fly over it. Fixed wing airplanes and helicopters depart out of the Page Municipal Airport daily, weather permitting, and possibly contingent on a certain number of passengers traveling. Neither aircraft would land anywhere on the lake (with the exception of a Tower Butte flight), but an air tour makes for an expedient, if not exciting way to get a glimpse of landmarks such as Rainbow Bridge, Horseshoe Bend, the Glen Canyon Dam, and much, much more.
      Whatever you decide, any guided activities or tours must be booked well in advance at the time of year you’re visiting, not so much because tours are busy, but because many tour companies lay off staff and take equipment off-line for servicing and routine maintenance.
      I do hope that helps! If you need to bounce other ideas off us, please contact us directly at [email protected]
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Thank you Alley! I appreciate your response. I sent an email to the email address you posted with the following question. What are the “musts” we should do if we will be in Page for 1 1/2 days (12/28 & 12/29). We are traveling with a very active 70 year old, who can hike without a problem. But no swimming, kayaking or fishing. Boat rides are ok too.

  3. We will be vacationing in Sedona in mid October and are planning a day trip to Page. We plan to tour Antelope Canyon in the morning, visit Horseshoe Bend, and then possibly hike a trail before heading back to Sedona. Is there a trail to the White House ruins? I am finding conflicting information online as to whether or not there is a trail open to the public. If so, is it worth it to hike the trail or just view from the overlook? Any other trails you recommend in the 1-2 hour range? We are also trying to decide between booking a tour of the upper Antelope Canyon or renting jet skis and exploring the other side of Antelope Canyon on our own. How different is the canyon on either side? We don’t want to miss out on the spectacular views in upper Antelope Canyon but we are also not really big tour group people. We like to explore! Pros and cons of either side? If we decide not to hike, what else would you suggest that we could fit in to an extra couple of hours? Since it is a 3 hour drive from Sedona we want to get the most out of our day!

    1. Hi Kristy,
      First off, mid-October is a great time to visit the American Southwest. If I’m interpreting your trip plan correctly, however, it’s too ambitious to pull off in one day, especially as a day trip from Sedona.
      As you have correctly stated, it takes ~3 hours to drive from Sedona to Page, AZ, one way. An Antelope Canyon walking tour, depending on which branch of the canyon you visit, any bottlenecking that might occur, etc., could take 2-3 hours, factoring in advance check-in time. If you opt for a kayak tour, that will run 3-4 hours. We recommend allotting approximately 90 minutes to 2 hours to visit Horseshoe Bend, including parking your vehicle, walking out to the rim, taking photos, then walking back to your vehicle. So there’s 4-6 hours of sightseeing right there. Then you’re facing a 3-hour drive back to Sedona, this on a day when you have less than 12 hours of daylight to work with. All driving in this part of the U.S. should be done during daylight hours. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife (or livestock) that can ratchet up your risk of a car accident. Believe me, that’s not something you want to risk in an area that’s pitch black, cold (nighttime temps in October typically dip down around freezing), where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. In mid-October, sunset occurs at 5:50 PM, meaning you’ll need to be on the road back to Sedona, AZ, by 3:00 PM, 3:30 PM at the latest.
      Long story short, hiking to the White House Ruins, which are situated in Canyon de Chelly National Park, another ~3 hour drive from Page, AZ, won’t be an option, unless you can somehow modify your trip plans to include an overnight in Page, AZ, or maybe Kayenta, AZ. Trip map
      As to whether you kayak Antelope Canyon or do a walking tour of Antelope Canyon, you will be sharing it with other people. It simply can’t be helped. A guided tour is required to visit all land-side segments of Antelope Canyon, including Upper, Lower, Antelope X, and Secret Antelope Canyon, since they are located on Navajo Indian Tribal Land. If you opt to rent a kayak or jet ski to self-tour the waterside, here again, you’ll be with other people. During the COVID-19 closure of the land-based segments of the canyon, exploring the waterside of Antelope Canyon became a tremendously popular alternative, since it is situated on Federal and not Tribal Land. It remains a popular alternative to sold out Antelope Canyon walking tours to this day, so even though you are, as you put “not big tour group people,” it’s pretty much unavoidable in Antelope Canyon. There are some alternate drainages of Antelope Canyon where the tour companies deliberately keep tour groups smaller, but be prepared to pay a little more $$$ for the privilege. How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon & Antelope Canyon Alternatives
      RE: the differences in scenery, Upper and Lower Antelope Canyons are where you’ll experience that iconic, picture-postcard slot canyon scenery. The waterside is more rugged, and a bit more labor-intensive on the tourist’s part, but still beautiful. It’s really hard to go wrong either way.
      Since White House Ruins is kind of off the table (unless you were to add an overnight stay somewhere), other trails you might enjoy time permitting include, but aren’t limited to, the Hanging Garden Trail and the New Wave/Radio Tower Rock Loop. These are located near the Glen Canyon Dam in Page, AZ, so they won’t take you too far out of your way, or put you at risk of driving back to Sedona, AZ, at night.
      If you are able to add an overnight in Page, AZ, to your schedule, you might also take advantage of the opportunity to hit the Sunset Crater/Wupatki Loop drive, just North of Flagstaff. Dominant features are a dormant volcano and an Ancestral Puebloan complex, respectively. You’ll pass right by it on the way from Sedona, AZ, to Page, AZ. Doing this will add another 2 hours, minimum, onto your drive time. Or, if you’ve scheduled a day in or near Flag (that’s what we call it around here) during your vacation, you might add this to your sightseeing plans for the day!
      Sorry if I’ve bounced around your inquiry in a haphazard instead of linear manner. If you have further questions, please feel free to contact me directly at [email protected]
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  4. Hi Alley, I will be getting into Under Canvas Grand Canyon on the 14 and will have basically from the 15th through the 17th (3 full days) to visit the Grand Canyon. Our plan was this:
    First day: Drive to the South Rim entrance and go around the Grand Canyon that day, what do you recommend here to put or time into?
    Second day: Drive to Page and go to Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon, and if time permits go to Lake Powell
    Third day: I am missing a plan for this day but the idea was to go towards the Skywalk and visit whathever is in the middle that day. What would you suggest?
    Does this plan makes sense?
    Regards

    1. Hi Gerardo!
      So, if I’m interpreting your comment correctly, you’re staying at Under Canvas for the next 3 days? Hope you like it hot, because that place has NO air conditioning, and overnight temperatures in Page, AZ, have been quite balmy.
      The drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim will take you anywhere from 3.5-4 hours. While the distance is only ~140 miles, which can be driven in 2.5 hours or less, that’s “wheels turning, no stops.” That rarely happens because the drive is very scenic and you will be stopping to take photos more than you realize. This is especially true of the section of AZ64 between Desert View Point and Grand Canyon Village, where there is over half a dozen named Grand Canyon viewpoints, all with varying perspectives and different features. You’ll want to stop at as many as possible. Upon arrival at Grand Canyon Village, park your vehicle as close to the rim as possible so you can walk the easy, paved Rim Trail, which passes by the El Tovar Hotel, Hopi House, Bright Angel Lodge, Lookout Studio, Kolb Studio and other Historic buildings. Time/desire permitting, you might also hop on the free shuttle that goes out to the viewpoints on the West Rim/Hermit’s Rest road. The main priority will be making sure you get back on the road so that you arrive back at Under Canvas by sundown. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit and their tendency to attract deer, elk, and other wildlife that can hike up your risk of a collision. That’s not something you want to risk in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. At this time of year, sunset occurs at around 7:45 PM, so 5:30-5:45 PM is the latest you should be back on the road.
      On your second day, you should be able to hit Antelope Canyon, Horseshoe Bend, and Lake Powell without much difficulty. Get an early start on the day so you can hit Horseshoe Bend when it’s cooler; sunrise occurs at roughly 5:20 AM. Hopefully, you’ve made an advance reservation for an Antelope Canyon tour, they are a must! For visiting Lake Powell, the most convenient access points are Antelope Point Marina, Lake Powell Resort, and Lone Rock Beach. Since these are within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, you’ll need to pay the $30/vehicle entrance fee, which is good for one week’s time, just keep your receipt and you can enter all 3 places with it if you wish.
      On day 3, I would not recommend trying to go to the Grand Canyon Skywalk. That is a really long drive away from Page (~6 hours), and it’s super-hot there this time of year. If you’re looking for a place to make a day trip to, you might consider Marble Canyon/Lees Ferry (~1 hour one way from Page), Zion National Park (~2 hour drive one way), or Bryce Canyon (~3 hour drive one way). There’s no shortage of cool places to visit much closer in proximity (and cooler [temperature-wise]) than the Grand Canyon Skywalk. FYI, the Grand Canyon Skywalk is closer in proximity to Las Vegas, NV, so if you’re traveling there at some point on your trip, that’s the best staging city for any trip or tour to the Skywalk.
      Hope that helps. If you have further questions, please contact me directly at [email protected]
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  5. Hi, traveling from Thunderbird Lodge in Grand Canyon to Zion Lodge on May 22nd, 2021. Are the road closures through that area?

    1. Hi Barbara,
      At the moment, all roads from Grand Canyon South Rim to Zion National Park are open and passable. The drive will take roughly 5 hours without stopping, but since it will take you by Horseshoe Bend in Page, AZ, you might take advantage of the opportunity to stop and visit.
      Still, I would strongly recommend monitoring the official website of Grand Canyon National Park as your trip date gets closer. The situation could change should there be an unexpected rise in COVID-19 cases, especially on the Navajo Reservation, where the previous road closure (AZ64 East from Desert View Point to Cameron AZ) occurred.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  6. Hi Alley.
    Our group of 5 will be in Page on May 5-May 6 2021.
    Is it now any public boat trip to Rainbow Bridge from Page? Any other boat trips we can do at May 6?
    If we will rent a boat or pontoon from Antelope point marina at May 6, what parts of lake you will recommend for 5-6 hours trip? What expectation for water level?
    Maybe you know somebody who could make a private boat trip on the lake?

    After Page we plan to drive to Sedona, but we steel not booked hotel from May 6 to May 7. Any advises about places we could see on the way to Sedona? Great Canyon Village? Or stay one more night at Page?

    Thank you for great advises!
    And how is AZ64?

    1. Hi Oleg,
      AZ64 East from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View Point on Grand Canyon’s East Rim reopened for travel on April 8th. Therefore, it will take you 3-3.5 hours to drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim, possibly longer if you take advantage of the opportunity to visit the half-a-dozen+ named viewpoints of the Grand Canyon between Desert View and Grand Canyon Village. For this reason, we do not recommend treating the Grand Canyon as a “drive-by” on the way to Sedona (which is another 2.5 hour drive from GC South Rim). If at all possible, try to stay at least one night at the Grand Canyon so you can experience sunset and/or sunrise on the rim, and maybe hit some of the viewpoints on the West Rim/Hermit’s Rest Road the following morning. If you’ve never been to the Grand Canyon, it definitely deserves high priority in your vacation plans!
      RE: Rainbow Bridge boat tours, they are on temporary hiatus due to COVID-19 and won’t resume running until June. Unfortunately, it’s a long way uplake (50+ miles one way) from Lake Powell Resort or Antelope Point Marina to Rainbow Bridge, so trying to get there on your own isn’t really practical. Another consideration: with Lake Powell water levels forecasted to dip to historic lows, a walk of 2-3 miles round-trip from the boat dock may be required to even get a glimpse of Rainbow Bridge. If all that sounds quite tedious, frankly, it is, but there’s another way to see Rainbow Bridge without exerting all that time and effort: fly over it! Fixed-wing airplanes depart from the Page Municipal Airport daily, weather permitting. While Rainbow Bridge Air Tours don’t land at the Bridge, they still show you a ton of incredible scenery in the space of just 30 minutes.
      If you do opt to still do a boat rental from either Antelope Point or Lake Powell Resort, you’ll find plenty of areas to explore in a half day’s time. Your boat rental outlet should offer a map, and suggestions on the best places to visit nearby. As for private boat tours, they are being offered by the Lake Powell Resort, with a US Coast Guard Certified Captain as your guide, so that would definitely be worth looking into! The Page/Lake Powell Hub (local tourist center) can arrange these for you. Simply call (928) 608-5749. If you speak with Gordon, tell him Alley said “hi!”
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  7. Hi Alley!
    We are planning a 5 day road trip following our daughter’s wedding in Telluride. On Monday, July 26 we thought we would start by driving from Telluride to Ridgeway and take the Million Dollar Highway through Ourey, stop for short version hike to waterfalls then continue to Durango, where we will spend 2 nights. Tuesday we plan to do the round trip train ride to Silverton. Wednesday we will head to Page for 1 night, then to Zion for 2 nights and ultimately drive to Vegas for a flight out on Saturday afternoon.
    I’m a little fuzzy on the logistics of our drive between Durango and Zion and how to maximize our limited time once we get there… because I’m geographically and time/distance challenged! Also, having just stumbled upon your site, I’m seeing posts about road closures, etc. Any advice you could contribute would be greatly appreciated!
    Along our drive we hope to see Mesa Verde, take in the sunset at Horseshoe bend, get a photo at Forrest Gump scene where he stops running, and stop at four corners. We’d like to arrive in Zion early enough to get the lay of the land, take in some sights and possibly do a day trip to Bryce the next day… or not?
    My husband & I are not conditioned hikers nor mobility challenged, but we tend more to enjoying the sights from the comfort of our vehicle.
    Thank you in advance for your help!

    1. Hi Loraine,
      Apologies for the delay in response to your inquiry. I was on a work assignment in Idaho over the weekend!
      Your trip plan looks pretty fun, but still warrants a couple of “reality checks.” Your first two days’ plans look pretty doable (I love Ouray, CO!), but things start to venture into the “overly ambitious” zone from there. The drive from Durango, CO, to Page, AZ, via Monument Valley will take at least 6 hours, wheels turning, no stops. That’s won’t leave much time to spend in Mesa Verde. While you can have an enjoyable visit in 4 hours’ time or less, I can pretty much guarantee that you will be planning a return visit to the Durango/Cortez area sometime in the future, which isn’t such a bad thing 😉 Should the Navajo Nation remain closed to visitors by the time you arrive, you can still pass through the area on US163 and get good views, but you may want to skip that photo op at Forrest Gump Point out of respect to the Tribe who have been hit disproportionately hard by COVID-19. Hopefully that will all be a moot point by the time you visit, but just something to keep in mind. In any case, get an early start on the day, and make sure that your activities are timed in order to arrive in Page, AZ, before nightfall. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S., especially on the Navajo Reservation (essentially between Cortez, CO, and Page, AZ), since local roads are very dimly lit, and possibly populated by deer, elk, free range cattle, and even wild horses. Trust me, you don’t want to risk a collision with a large animal in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Sunset in Page, AZ, occurs just after 7:30 PM at the time of your visit. Sunrise in Durango, CO will take place at around 6:15 AM.
      If you don’t manage to hit Horseshoe Bend by sunset that day, don’t sweat that too hard. You’re traveling at the hottest time of the year, so sunrise is actually a better time to visit Horseshoe Bend so you can take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. Zion will then be ~a 90-minute drive from Horseshoe Bend. Be aware that to access Zion Canyon, the main sightseeing area of the park, requires that you ride a shuttle, which you have to purchase tickets in advance for. Should you not want to deal with that hassle, there are places you can see from the main highway through the park (UT-9, aka the Zion-Mt. Carmel Highway).
      If you wanted to do a day trip to Bryce, then you should probably base yourself in Kanab, UT, for the Zion-Bryce leg of your trip. That town is centrally located to both parks, with Zion being ~45 minutes drive, Bryce being ~90 minutes drive (those figures are one way).
      BTW, the road closures you have seen me mention in past replies won’t affect you on your proposed route. It was mainly affecting those traveling between Page, AZ, and Grand Canyon South Rim, necessitating a rather long detour through Flagstaff, AZ, due to the closure of AZ64 East from Desert View Point to Cameron, AZ.
      Hey, speaking of the Grand Canyon, I’m noticing it’s absent from your itinerary. Have you already been? If not, you should give it a high priority on this trip since you’re in the area already. In your case, the North Rim would actually be more convenient to see, but lodging for the season is sold out. If desired, you could visit it as a day trip from Kanab, UT, fairly easily. From Kanab, UT, to GC North Rim is ~a 90-minute drive each way. Same rule applies about timing your return trip so you’re back to base by nightfall. Another way to see the Grand Canyon without all that time behind the wheel is to fly over it. Fixed-wing airplanes depart daily from the Page Municipal Airport, weather permitting, and usually contingent on a certain number of passengers traveling. While Page-Grand Canyon Air Tours would not land at either the North or South Rim, they would still show you a ton of amazing scenery in the course of just 90 minutes’ air time!
      Custom Trip Map
      Whatever you decide, be sure to book all your hotels and guided tours well in advance of your trip.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Thank you so much, Alley! This has given us a lot to process!
        Yes, we have been to the southern rim of the Grand Canyon and due to our tight schedule for this trip, we opted to omit seeing the northern rim.
        Initially our primary interest in going to Page was to visit Antelope Canyon. As no one knows when they might reopen (our prayers go out to the Navaho Nation 🙏🏻), we are now considering skipping Page altogether and instead traveling to Zion from Durango via I-70 W.
        If we can visit Bryce before reaching Zion, we can shorten our stay there in order to extend our stay in Durango another night… in which case we would do a day trip to Mesa Verde from there.
        Can you suggest a 1 night stopping place to break up our drive and recommend which “must see” sights… Arches, Capitol Reef and, of course, Bryce Canyon, etc… to visit along our way to Zion?
        I greatly appreciate your continued help! Thank you again!

      2. Alley,
        We also plan to add a day to our trip and push our flight out of Las Vegas to Sunday vs Saturday… to give us time to see Zion.
        Our trip now looks like 3 nights (M,T,W) in Durango… drive to Zion via I-70 W with 1 night (TH) en route… 2 nights (F,S) in Springdale.
        Looking forward to your logistical recommendations for our drive from Durango to Zion (parks to visit and where to stop 1 night).
        Thanks!

  8. Hi Alley
    A friend and I want to visit Antelope Canyon, the Wave, and Escalante next Sept. Do you have any knowledge about if they will be open in Sept? What would be your suggestions for an itinerary? we will be driving from CO
    Thanks

    1. Hi Karen,
      Unfortunately we have no idea when the Antelope Canyons will reopen. As for the Wave and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, these are open for visitation, but The Wave probably won’t happen for you. This area is managed by the Bureau of Land Management and as a geologically unique and fragile area, they only allow a certain number of people to enter. An online lottery for the majority of permits is held 4 months in advance (which is May for September permits), then a walk-in lottery for a limited number of permits is held the day prior to when one wishes to hike in Kanab, UT. With September weather being relatively nice, it’s a highly competitive period for Wave permits, which means your odds are even slimmer. How To Get A Wave Permit
      Long story short: start thinking of other areas you might visit in the very likely event you don’t succeed at getting a Wave permit. The most popular Wave alternative at present is White Pocket. This is a stunning area, that by some miracle doesn’t require a permit (yet) and does not involve a lot of hiking. While a guided tour is not required to visit this area, they come strongly recommended since the access road out there is through deep sand and should only be attempted by those with extensive 4×4 driving experience, and definitely not by parties in rental cars. There are several companies offering White Pocket tours, but the ones we are most familiar with are Paria Outpost and Dreamland Safari Tours.
      As for an itinerary, if you’re driving from Colorado, you have several options, for example, you could use Durango, CO, as your starting point, visit Mesa Verde National Park, then swing North to Moab, UT, where you should definitely spend at least 3 days, then over to Capitol Reef, Bryce Canyon, Zion, then Page, AZ. Another option is to skip Moab and Capitol Reef and come to Page, AZ, through Monument Valley (which may be closed depending on the decision of the Navajo Tribe, but you could still pass through), then Zion, Bryce, and Grand Staircase-Escalante, which you could see the Western flank of driving from Page, AZ, to Kanab, UT.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  9. What time do the parking spots for Horseshoe Bend open to the public? Or, what time are we allowed to enter Horseshoe Bend?

    1. Hi Tavia,
      The Horseshoe Bend parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset 🙂
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  10. Hi Alley,

    A group of 5 ladies are planning to drive from Sedona on May 14th around 6 AM. We were hoping to see Grand Canyon and Horseshoe Bend on the same day with just quick pit stops to view the scenic beauty as our time is limited. Do you think we can both places happen? If so, how would you recommend for us to do it? If not, what would be your ideal recommendation between Grand Canyon versus Horseshoe Bend. Thank you in advance

    1. Hey Sandy,
      Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but it is not practical or desirable to attempt to visit the Grand Canyon and Horseshoe Bend on the same day.
      The drive from Sedona, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim takes ~2.5 hours. Normally, the drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, would take ~3 hours, but at the present time, a critical component of the shortest travel route from GC to Horseshoe Bend (AZ64 from Desert View to Cameron, AZ) is closed due to COVID-19. This means that people traveling from GC to Page, AZ, or vice versa have to drive all the way back down to Flagstaff, AZ, then proceed North again. This has turned what is normally ~a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive. You would then have a 3-hour drive to get back to Sedona, AZ, from Page, AZ. So that’s 11-12 hours of driving on a day that has ~14 hours of daylight to work with. That’s not enough time to accomplish everything you want, and if you’re thinking, “well, I’ll just drive back to Sedona, AZ, after sunset,” think again: nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in the more rural areas of Northern Arizona and Southern Utah due to local roads being very dimly lit, and situated in areas populated by deer, elk, and other wildlife that could elevate your risk of an auto accident. A collision with a large animal is not something you want to risk in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, where nights are still cold, cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
      If you are already locked into your hotel reservations in Sedona, AZ, and have to make day trips, you should plan on 2 separate days for the Grand Canyon and Horseshoe Bend.

      1. Alley,

        If we chose to drive directly to Horseshoe bend from Sedona, are the roads open? Its around 3 hour drive right? We had plans to rent kayaks to go through Lake Powell to paddle into the Antelope Canyon as we heard that is the only way to see some of the Canyon. Are there any recommendations from your end? Thank you in advance.

        1. Hey again, Sandy!
          All roads from Sedona, AZ, to Horseshoe Bend (Page, AZ) are open. You are correct that it is ~a 3-hour drive. At present, you should avoid stopping between Flagstaff, AZ, and Page, AZ, as that is on Navajo reservation land and they still discourage contact between outsiders and tribe members. Be sure your vehicle is fully fueled prior to leaving Flagstaff, AZ, and that you have adequate water and snacks to tide you over until you get to Page, AZ.
          There are several companies offering kayak tours and rentals into the waterside of Antelope Canyon. The one we’re most familiar with is Lake Powell Hidden Canyon Kayak, but they’re all established companies with excellent reputations for safety and service. If you do opt for a kayak tour or rental, it is best to do this activity first thing in the morning for less wind and minimal “chop” from larger boat traffic.
          Have a great trip!
          Alley 🙂

      2. Hi alley! My girlfriend and I are making the trip out to Arizona and Utah from Orange County California during memorial weekend and are wondering if you know when the AZ64 from Desert View to Cameron, AZ is going to open so we can plan accordingly. Thank you so much!

        1. Hey Shaun,
          Am happy to report that AZ64 East from Desert View to Cameron is open now! But before you start doing the happy dance, be aware that the Navajo Tribe, on whose land this section of road sits, is pushing for it to re-close. I know that throws a possible wrench into your trip planning. I’d strongly recommend monitoring the National Park Service website for Grand Canyon National Park for current status of the road, and be prepared to make the detour through Flagstaff, AZ, in order to get from GC South Rim to Page, AZ, in the event AZ64 East does close up once more. We’re crossing fingers and toes that it doesn’t, but you know the old saying: “Don’t ‘assume’ or you make an @ss out of u and me!”
          Sorry I couldn’t be more helpful than that.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  11. Hi Alley,
    We will be staying in Kanab May 18-20 (Zion) and then planned to drive to the Lake Powell area on the 21st. We were going to rent a boat for a day on the lake and do Horseshoe Bend another day before driving to St. George on the 24th for an early flight out on the 25th. 2 questions, are there any road closures that will effect our travel and what do you suggest for our second day besides Horseshoe Bend (since Antelope Canyon is closed). We’re not kayakers (I’ve tried) so not interested in kayaking in.
    Thanks!
    Leesa

    1. Hi Leesa!
      If you’re not into kayaking but still want to see a slot canyon whilst you’re in the Page/Kanab area, you’ll be glad to know you can still cross that item off your wish list.
      In Kanab, UT, Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon has been a popular alternative to the Antelope Canyons. With twists and turns on par with Antelope, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery, as well as some geological features unique to it alone. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you consider taking one. The walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, but the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. Tour companies that can get you to Peek-A-Boo in safety are:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      Between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, near the town of Paria, UT, you’ll find Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch. Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, usually full of deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights, but a ladder recently placed at this obstacle has made it more accessible to these groups. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead, or in advance through Recreation.gov. Access to Wire Pass Canyon is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road, another unpaved thoroughfare. While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, it will turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road, and opt for the safety of a guided tour based companies offering guided tours with:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  12. Hi Alley- I can’t seem to find my q to you from last week so perhaps I did something wrong. Thanks for all this great info!!! What is the drive like from Page to Bryce to Zion to Vegas? Easy? We will be driving from Sedona to GC to Page (thanks for info about road closures) and I hear all that is a fairly easy drive so wondering about the second leg of the trip. Thanks so much!

    1. Hey Colleen,
      OMG I’m so sorry that your original question did not get answered! I’ve tried looking for it and had no luck, but I certainly hope you didn’t think I was ignoring you because I’d never do that.
      The drives you mention are all on paved, well-traveled highways, mostly two-lane, so no danger of getting lost or anything like that. The drive from Sedona through Oak Creek Canyon is very scenic (as are all the legs of your trip), but also a bit on the twisty side, so be ready for that. The section of I-15 from Zion to Las Vegas will take you through the Virgin River Gorge, which has its share of twists and turns, and you may encounter some road construction.
      The closure you’ve seen mentioned is on AZ64 East from Desert View Point at Grand Canyon South Rim to Cameron, AZ, on the Navajo Reservation. This means that when you get ready to go to Page, AZ, from GC, you’ll have to drive all the way back to Flagstaff, AZ, then proceed North to Page on US89. This has turned what used to be about a 3-hour drive into more like 5 hours. If you’re of a mind to “make lemonades out of lemons,” you might take advantage of the opportunity to enjoy the Wupatki/Sunset Crater Scenic Loop Drive, which will take you by a dormant volcano and a Sinagua Indian Pueblo complex (a rather sophisticated one at that!).
      On the way back to Las Vegas, NV, maybe stop by the stunning Valley of Fire State Park, just Northeast of town. Try to get there early if you’re traveling in the summer months, though, as it does get really hot there.
      One commonality on all these roads: you should try to do your driving during daylight hours. Nighttime driving is discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to most roads being very dimly lit, and the surrounding areas being populated by deer, elk, and other wildlife that just love to jump out in front of cars. A collision with a large animal can be a real buzz kill, especially in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Between St. George, UT, and Las Vegas, NV, you have a pretty good-sized artificial light dome, so it’s not that big a deal there, or between Phoenix, AZ, and Sedona, AZ. Everywhere else, know when sunset occurs and time your trips accordingly.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  13. Hello!!
    I am taking a trip next week and would love a little advice. I am flying into Vegas on Saturday, April 3rd. I am staying in Vegas Saturday night and heading out in the morning. I plan to go to Zion and have a hotel booked in Zion on Sunday night. I also want to go to Bryce, see those pink sand dunes near Kanab and then maybe Lake Powell and Grand Canyon. I need to end up back in Vegas Friday evening. I would love some suggestions on how I can see all of these places. I read a post about the one road closure so would need to factor that in.
    Thank you for you’re help in advanced!!

    1. Hi Jenna!
      First, I would recommend booking a second night in Zion. You’ll be glad you had it as it is a huge park which really warrants 4-5 days to do it justice, and even then, people report back feeling as though they’d only “scratched the surface.”
      You would need to factor in the road closure between Cameron, AZ, and Desert View Point at the Grand Canyon. That means you would have to drive from Page, AZ, all the way down to Flagstaff, AZ, then proceed North via US180/AZ64 North or I-40/AZ64 North.
      Given your time constraints, you could do something like this:
      April 3rd: Fly into Las Vegas, overnight in Las Vegas
      April 4th: Drive to Zion (~3 hours), overnight in Zion
      April 5th: 2nd day/night in Zion, sightseeing on Zion Canyon Shuttle or from trailheads accessible on Zion-Mt. Carmel Highway (UT9)
      April 6th: Drive to Bryce (~2 hours), overnight in Bryce Canyon area
      April 7th: Drive to Page, AZ, stop at Coral Pink Sand Dunes (~90 minutes from Bryce, ~2 hours from Page), overnight in Page, AZ
      April 8th: Visit Horseshoe Bend, drive to Grand Canyon South Rim (~5 hours), overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim
      April 9th: Drive back to Las Vegas, ~5 hours, fly home
      Custom trip map
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  14. Hi. We are planning to stay in Hurricane, Utah from May 18-21, 2021 which is 4 days & 3 nights. We will be going to Zion National Park one of those days but we want to go to the Grand Canyon North Rim and Horseshoe Bend as well. Do you recommend Horseshoe Bend one day and Grand Canyon North Rim another day. We are still planning activities for each visit. I assume that Antelope Canyon might possibly be closed and if open, we might visit that when we go to Horseshoe Bend. Thanks.

    1. Hi Gary!
      Seeing as though it takes ~3 hours, one way, to drive from Hurricane, UT, to Grand Canyon North Rim, you’ll definitely need to plan for another day to go to Horseshoe Bend, which is just South of Page, AZ.
      It takes ~2.5 hours, again, that’s one way, to drive from Hurricane, UT, to Horseshoe Bend. Be sure to allot ~2 hours to park your vehicle at Horseshoe Bend, walk to the rim, take photos, then walk back to your vehicle. As for the status of Antelope Canyon, that remains uncertain. You should probably count on it not being available at the time of your visit just to be on the safe side. A popular alternative last year was to kayak into the waterside of Antelope Canyon on Lake Powell, then hike into the pre-slot portion of the Lower Canyon, which is on Federal and not Tribal land. However, that activity is best done first thing in the morning, so you’d be better off spending a night in Page, AZ, for that. If that is not possible, on the way from Hurricane, UT, to Page, AZ, you might stop off at Wire Pass Canyon, which is off the House Rock Valley Road between Kanab, UT, and Page, AZ. It’s a pretty easy hike, guided tours are not required, but if recent weather has brought any moisture at all, skip it. The House Rock Valley Road is unpaved, and becomes a slippery, muddy mess every time it rains.
      If setting aside two separate days to visit Grand Canyon North Rim and Horseshoe Bend is not feasible or desirable, a way to “have your cake and eat it too” would be to go to Page, AZ, and fly over the Grand Canyon. Fixed wing airplanes depart out of the Page Municipal Airport daily, weather permitting, and possibly contingent on a certain number of passengers being booked. Page-Grand Canyon air tours
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  15. Hi Alley,

    I am planning a trip for this coming April, 2021. I have heard some scenic sites remain closed. Can you tell me if my trip itinerary makes sense.

    Day 1: Leave Vegas- head to Best Friend’s Animal Sanctuary and then Page (Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend
    spend night in Page.
    Day2: Drive from Page to South Rim of the Canyon
    drive to Sedona, spend the night
    Day 3: Check our Sedona and head back to Vegas

    1. Hey Lori,
      Sorry to be the bearer of bad news here, but this won’t work, mainly because the shortest travel route between Page, AZ, and Las Vegas, NV isn’t fully accessible due to COVID-19. Due to the closure of AZ64 East from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View Point, which is on Navajo Indian Tribal Land, it is now necessary to detour all the way down to Flagstaff, AZ, then proceed North to the park via US180/AZ64 or I-40/AZ64. This has turned what is normally a 3-hour drive into more along the lines of a 5-hour drive. After all that, you’d be facing ~a 3-hour drive to Sedona, then head back to Vegas the following morning, which is ~a 5-hour drive as well. Not my idea of a vacation. Besides, Sedona, AZ, is a huge and beautiful area that warrants 3-4 days minimum to fully enjoy and explore. Even then, visitors report back feeling as though they’d only scratched the surface of everything Sedona had to offer. Save it for another trip when you can give it the time it deserves!
      On Day 2, hit Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning, head to the Grand Canyon and spend the night there. Then head back to Las Vegas, NV, from there (~4.5 hours).
      Unfortunately, walking tours of Antelope Canyon remain closed to visitors by order of the Navajo Tribe. A popular alternative is to take a kayak tour into the waterside of Antelope Canyon, which includes some hiking into the section of the Lower Canyon, which is on Federal and not Tribal Land. Since these tours are approximately 3-4 hours long, that would put you at Grand Canyon South Rim close to nightfall, which wouldn’t allow much time for sightseeing.
      Trip map
      Whatever you decide, be sure that you do all of your driving during daylight hours. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in the more rural parts of Northern Arizona and Southern Utah. Roads in these areas are very dimly lit, plus they are populated by deer, elk, and other wildlife that can elevate your risk of a collision. That’s definitely not something you want to chance in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, where cell service is going to be spotty (if you can get any bars at all) and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. In April, sunrise takes place just before 6:00 AM, sunset occurs at approximately 7:00 PM Arizona Time. Utah is one hour ahead during Daylight Savings Time.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  16. Hi Alley, I’m so glad I came across this!
    I’m landing in Flagstaff at 7pm in 2 weeks and plan to drive to Page from there. I’m scheduled for a kayaking trip to Antelope canyon the next day at 11am. Also, I already booked my hotel in Page. I’ve read that it’s too dangerous driving at night from Flagstaff to Page. Should I stay in Flagstaff instead then drive up to Page first thing in the morning?

    1. Hi Mel,
      IMO it would be safer to plan on driving to Page, AZ, the morning after your flight lands in Flagstaff, AZ, especially if your flight should happen to get in late or there are other unforeseen complications. Also, I’m not certain if it’s possible to pick up a rental car that late at Flagstaff/Pulliam Airport, so you might want to verify that as well.
      The drive to Page, AZ, from Flagstaff, AZ, takes approximately 2.5 hours. Sunrise occurs just before 7:00 AM, so if you hit the road first thing in the morning, you should have no problem getting to your kayak tour on time.
      FYI nighttime driving is discouraged in Northern Arizona due to local roads being very dimly lit (a deliberate move in some cases to preserve the natural darkness of the night sky), and the possibility of encountering deer, elk, or other nocturnal wildlife. You don’t want to risk a collision with a large animal in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, cold, where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  17. Hello,
    We are traveling to Phoenix from the 20th to the 27th and we are looking for places that we can visit while we are there, we are open for any suggestion. Our original plan was to visit Havasu falls and Antelope Canyons, but both places are cosed at the moment.

    1. Hi Sonia,
      You are correct in that Havasu Falls and the Antelope Canyons won’t be an option this time around. Havasu Falls is a trip unto itself, that requires quite a lot in the way of advance planning and ancillary logistics, so do a little more research on that for the future at http://www.HavasupaiReservations.com
      Fortunately, for the Antelope Canyons, there are alternatives. The most popular is to kayak into the waterside of Antelope Canyon from Antelope Point Marina, then hike into the “pre-slot” portion of the lower canyon on the shoreline of Lake Powell, which is on Federal and not Tribal land. While the scenery of the canyon is not quite the “classic” slot canyon scenery of Lower Antelope, judging from the number of sold-out days last year, people didn’t seem to mind a bit! Another popular alternative is Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch, near Paria, UT (~45 minutes from Page, AZ). You can enjoy this as either a self-guided hike, or go with a guided tour. Time and/or desire permitting, you can also hit the easy but rewarding Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail on the way to or from Wire Pass from Page, AZ. Here’s a video depicting a young family enjoying both Wire Pass Canyon and the Toadstools using Page, AZ, as a base: Look Who’s Blogging Wire Pass Trail to Buckskin Gulch Slot Canyon | Toadstool Hoodoos Trail, Utah BTW, Page, AZ, is ~a 4.5 hour drive, one way, from Phoenix, so you should definitely look at this as a 1-2 night trip, and not a day trip from Phoenix! Page, AZ, Hotels
      All that said, if you’ve never been to the Grand Canyon, you should definitely make a point of going there before you do anything else! Grand Canyon South Rim is also ~4.5 hours, one way, from Phoenix, so here again, plan to stay overnight there for optimal safety and comfort!
      Sedona, AZ, is also lovely, and offers enough to see and do to easily occupy a 3-4 night stay, but since it’s 2-2.5 hours from Phoenix, it can be visited as a day trip if need be. But I can pretty much guarantee that a day trip will leave you wanting!
      Hope that helps. Please contact us at [email protected] if we can be of further assistance.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Alley,
        Your advice and expertise is AMAZING. I do not know how else to message you than to reply off one of your messages. I am planning a trip to Page AZ. Leaving Peoria, AZ Friday, May 21st on Saturday May 22 we are kayaking Lake Powell. Heading back home to Peoria, AZ on Monday, May 24th. Other than Kayaking what recommendations to you have for fun things to do in that short amount of time. Fingers crossed that Antelope Canyon is open by then. I would hate to drive that far and not be able to see it. Thank you

        1. Hey Tracy,
          Your message came through loud and clear! 🙂
          We, too, are crossing fingers and toes that the Antelope Canyons reopen by the time you are ready to visit! If they’re not, an easy way to salvage that item on your “wish list” would be to change your kayaking reservations to a tour that goes into the waterside of Antelope Canyon and includes some hiking in the “pre-slot” portion of the lower canyon on the shoreline of the lake, which is Federal and not Tribal land.
          Should you be good to go for a land-side tour of Antelope Canyon, that will last anywhere from 2-4 hours depending on which section of the canyon you tour. So that would leave a substantial part of the day open for more sightseeing! Fortunately, there’s no shortage of opportunities. Horseshoe Bend is a definite must, and I would suggest hitting that on your way back to Peoria, or on your way into town that first day, since it’s just South of town. At the time of year you’re visiting, though, the hours just after sunrise would offer the dual benefits of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
          For the rest of your time, choose from:
          Page Rim View Trail
          Glen Canyon Dam/Steel Arch Bridge
          Hanging Garden Trail & The Chains
          Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook
          Grand View Overlook Park
          The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
          Gunfighter Canyon
          Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach (located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time)
          If you have the time and/or inclination to venture a short way into Utah, you might also visit:
          Big Water Visitors Center & Dinosaur Museum (in Big Water, UT, ~20 minutes from Page)
          Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail (~1 hour from Page, AZ, trailhead at mile marker 19 on US89)
          Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  18. Hi Alley,
    We’re planning on flying into Vegas the week of March 15, staying in Vegas for two nights followed by 4 nights on the road finishing back in Vegas for another night before flying home for a family trip, 2 kids (ones an infant). Ideally we wanted to see Zion, antelope but closed, horseshoe bend, Grand Canyon including skyway. I see you mention somewhere about road closures which I never thought of.

    Is this realistic given our time and do you have any suggestions or things to look out for having an infant? Will be renting a car and have a week. Thank you so much in advance.

    1. Hi Darren,
      With an infant in tow, you’ll need to make sure you’re not spending long hours in the car. In this part of the country, long drives unfortunately can’t be helped, and there is a road closure that’s making one in particular longer than normal. More on that in a minute.
      RE: the Grand Canyon “skyway,” it’s actually called the Grand Canyon Skywalk. This attraction is located at Grand Canyon West, and not Grand Canyon National Park. If you’re a first-time visitor to the Grand Canyon, we recommend trying to visit Grand Canyon National Park as this area of the Grand Canyon will have the “picture-postcard” views you’re expecting to see. At the time of your trip, the South Rim is the only side of the National Park that’s open.
      Given your time constraints, here’s what I’d recommend:
      Day 1: Drive to Zion National Park (~3 hours from Las Vegas), concentrate sightseeing on what you can see from the Mt. Carmel Highway (Highway 9), then drive to Kanab, UT (~1 hour), for overnight
      Day 2: Tour Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon first thing in AM, then drive to Page, AZ (~90 minutes from Kanab), overnight in Page
      Day 3: Visit Horseshoe Bend on way to Grand Canyon South Rim **this is where the road closure comes into play: normally, this is ~a 3-hour drive, but the necessity of detouring through Flagstaff, AZ due to the closure of AZ64 East has turned this into more of a 5-hour drive; be sure your vehicle is fully fueled and that you have water and snacks in the car to tide you over until you get to Grand Canyon South Rim*** overnight at the South Rim
      Day 4: Drive back to Las Vegas, NV (~4.5 hours)
      As you can see from the trip map, the Grand Canyon Skywalk could be seen on the way back from Grand Canyon South Rim to Las Vegas, but that would turn this day into an awfully long drive as it would add another 2.5 hours onto your trip time. If you are able/willing to schedule a trip to Grand Canyon South Rim for the future, another option would be to use one of your road days to visit Grand Canyon West as a day trip from Las Vegas, then visit Zion, Peek-A-Boo Canyon, and Horseshoe Bend using the other 3 days you have.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  19. Hi,
    My daughter and I are planning a 4 day visit in about a week. Flying into Phoenix and hoping to visit Grand Canyon, Horseshoe Bend, and WirePass Canyon, as Antelope Canyon is closed. I realize this may be a little ambitious, wanting to squeeze in all we can without being run ragged. Planning to book/stay at hotels along the way so we are not under any commitment. Is this possible or bad idea? Have never been to Arizona before. Thanks for any suggestions.

    1. Hey Shelby,
      Hopefully you have 4 full days to work with. That way you can stay 2 nights in Grand Canyon, 2 nights in Page, AZ.
      I strongly recommend you rethink “booking hotels along the way.” You need to realize that you’re proposing to travel during what is Spring Break for some schools, and a lot of quarantine-weary people who are chomping at the bit to get out and travel. If you find hotels in one area sold out, you could find yourself having to drive a long distance to find someplace that’s available. Naturally, that’s worst case scenario, but in this part of the U.S., with towns and cities being separated by long distances, it’s better to be safe than sorry.
      If you wish to visit Horseshoe Bend and Wire Pass Canyon, then book a hotel in Page, AZ. You can hit Horseshoe Bend on your way into town from Phoenix, or hit it first thing in the morning the following day. On your Wire Pass day, time/desire permitting, you might also hit the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail. This is a cool little hike, and fairly easy. This video depicts a young family doing both hikes in the course of a day.
      The drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim will be ~4-5 hours due to the necessity of detouring through Flagstaff, AZ, then back up North via US180/AZ64N due to a COVID-19 related road closure. Be sure to book a Grand Canyon hotel room in advance as well. That way, you’ll be ideally situated to see sunset and/or sunrise at the best place possible: right on the canyon rim!
      The drive back to Phoenix from Grand Canyon South Rim would then take ~4-5 hours.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  20. Hi Alley. Planning a short trip to AZ on the first weekend of May. We only have 2 days, maybe 3. Our plan is:
    Day 1 – Drive from Phoenix to Grand Canyon, enjoy the park, them drive to Page and stay the night.
    Day 2 – Visit the Antelope Canyon (if open), Horseshoe bend, and maybe Lake Powell.
    Do you thinks it will be enough time for doing those things?
    We like to hike, so our plan is to do a short hike on the first day.
    Thanks!

    1. Hi Daniele,
      Sorry, but this plan is not realistic. Too. Much. Driving.
      It takes approximately 4-5 hours to drive from Phoenix to Grand Canyon South Rim. Normally, the drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, takes ~3 hours, but due to a critical component of the shortest travel route being closed due to COVID-19 (AZ64 East from Desert View Point to Cameron, AZ), it is necessary to detour all the way back to Flagstaff, AZ, then back up North via US89. This has turned a 3-hour drive into more along the lines of 5 hours.
      The section of road from Desert View Point to Cameron is scheduled to reopen May 21st. The Navajo Tribe is crossing fingers and toes that the Antelope Canyons will reopen in April, but none of this is etched in stone.
      If two days are all you have to work with this time around, and you’ve never been to the Grand Canyon, prioritize it over anything else. If you can possibly carve out an extra day, or two, then you might be able to work Page, AZ, into your plans comfortably.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  21. Hi Alley,
    Planning on spring break trip to AZ x 8 days driving from Sacramento. Trying to make it to Grand Canyon for sunset, stay x 1 night, visit GC during the day and drive to Sedona in the evening x 2 nights. drive to Page in AM x 2 nights and also visit Grand Escalante. drive in the Am to Bluff and stay x 1 night to visit Valley of the Gods. in the Am drive to Tucson (will drop by Petrified NF along the way) and stay x 1 night then explore Saguaro NP x 1 day. Drive home next day. Is this too ambitious or doable? Any suggestions? We are a convoy of 4 families with different age groups for the kids (youngest is 8) with no mobility problems.

    1. Hey Leah!
      With only 8 days to work with, I would strongly recommend trimming your “wish list.”
      Looking at what you want to accomplish, you’re basically talking about two separate trips:
      1. Petrified Forest-Grand Canyon-Page-Grand Staircase-Bluff
      2. Sedona-Phoenix-Tucson-Saguaro National Park
      To try to hit all these destinations in just 8 days time is going to mean too. much. driving.
      Since this is a Spring Break trip, you might take the opportunity to hit the attractions in Southern Arizona this time around, maybe hitting Petrified Forest and/or Sedona as well. The reason I suggest this is because the summer months will be ghastly hot in the Phoenix/Tucson area and not really conducive to outdoor sightseeing. Weather in the Southern part of the state will be balmy during Spring Break, but not to the point that it’s unbearable. Not usually, anyway 😉
      If the Grand Canyon and attractions in that area have been decided by majority vote or other means, then you must be aware that the drive from Sacramento to Grand Canyon South Rim is very long, anywhere from 13-15 hours. With kids in tow, I’d strongly recommend breaking up the drive into two days. Las Vegas, NV, makes for a good point stopover point; the drive from there to Grand Canyon South Rim would then be ~5 hours. Or you could head down 99 and make Barstow, CA, your half-way point. Just make sure you avoid Baker, CA, though, that town’s hinky. I’m also going to suggest you take Bluff, UT, and Valley of the Gods off the table. Not that these areas aren’t beautiful — they definitely are — but they’re an awfully long swing out of your way, and you’ve already drastically underestimated your drive times.
      In light of these concerns, here’s what I’d recommend:
      Day 1 – Leave Sacramento, CA, overnight in Barstow, CA, or Las Vegas, NV (~8-9 hour drive) Best Kid-Friendly Hotels in Las Vegas, NV
      Day 2 – Drive from Las Vegas to Sedona (~5 hours), overnight in Sedona
      Day 3 – 2nd day/night in Sedona, plenty of family-friendly hikes to enjoy!
      Day 4 – Drive from Sedona to Grand Canyon South Rim (~3 hours), optional stop at Planes of Fame Museum in Valle, AZ, overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim
      Day 5 – Drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Horseshoe Bend (Page, AZ) ***normally, this drive would take you ~3 hours, but due to the closure of a critical component of the shortest travel route (AZ64 from Desert View Point to Cameron, AZ), it is now necessary to detour through Flagstaff, AZ, then back North on US89 to get to Page, AZ; this has turned a 3-hour drive into more like 5 hours*** overnight in Page, AZ
      Day 6 – Drive from Page, AZ, to Zion National Park (~2 hours); this drive will naturally take you past the Western flank of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. A fun little hike to take en route is the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail at Mile Marker 19 of US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT. Fast forward to the 6:19 mark on this YouTube video to see a young family hiking this trail. Before that, the video depicts a hike through the Wire Pass Canyon and part of the Buckskin Gulch, which you also might enjoy. Overnight in Springdale, UT.
      Day 7 – 2nd day/night in Zion National Park. Note that to access the main sightseeing area of Zion, you’ll have to utilize the Zion Canyon Shuttle, which is free, but may require advance ticket purchase.
      Day 8 – Begin trip back to Sacramento, CA. On this leg of the trip, instead of going back through Las Vegas, NV, you might use historic Tonopah, NV, as your mid-way stopover (~6 hours from Zion), then continue on home via South Lake Tahoe. Trip map Another option would be to stop over in Death Valley.
      The main priority right now is to get your hotel accommodations booked. Ditto for guided tours if you’re interested in those. If need dictates, you might take this itinerary in reverse.
      I hope that helps, I know it’s a lot to digest! If you need to bounce more ideas off us, feel free to contact us directly by e-mail at [email protected]
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Elizabeth,
      Wow, great question!
      Horseshoe Bend would be OK provided you don’t carry a humungous cooler out there and you pick up after yourself.
      Another place with a great view is Grandview Overlook Park in the town of Page, AZ, near Lakeview Elementary School. If you’re not super-concerned about having good view, there are a couple of parks in Page, AZ, with picnic tables that visitors are welcome to utilize. The Page City Park is located behind the local Safeway store. Golliard Park is next door to the Page Municipal Airport. It’s kinda fun to watch the planes and helicopters land and take off from there!
      If the campsites are not full, you might also try Beehive Campground, and after lunch, enjoy a walk to the New Wave and Radio Tower Rock.
      If you have a National Park Pass, or don’t mind paying the $30/vehicle entrance fee into the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, you might also enjoy your lunch at the Wahweap Swim Beach, which is a short distance from Lake Powell Resort complex. There are some covered ramadas with picnic tables and BBQ grills there.
      Hope that gives you some good ideas!
      Enjoy your picnic, and your visit to Page, AZ,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Denise,
      Yes, you pay a one-time fee of $10/standard passenger vehicle to park at Horseshoe Bend.
      Alley 🙂

  22. Hello
    I’ve just booked a trip for mid March for us to be in the Grand Canyon.
    While there we wanted to take a day trip to Horseshoe Bend & Antelope Canyon.
    Are there any companies that offer a trip leaving from the Grand Canyon Village? I’d like to go on the boat float, be able to look from the top / take photos at Horseshoe Bend and also see Antelope Canyon. If not from the Grand Canyon, we’ll have a car so could drive to Page, AZ?
    I understand Antelope Canyon is closed at the moment due to COVID. If it doesn’t reopen, ’ve heard there are other really wonderful caves in the area with similarities… are there any others that would be not far out of the way in case we do decide to drive?

    Thanks for any info you can provide!

    1. Hi Natalie,
      You are correct that the Antelope Canyons remain closed. As to when they will re-open to tourists, we don’t know, but “unofficial” word has it that Spring will be the earliest, and that’s being optimistic.
      Under normal circumstances, there is a day trip from Grand Canyon Village that would accomplish your goals, that would be the Canyon River Adventure, also known as the Antelope Canyon with Rafting Tour. Starting first thing in the morning with a fixed-wing airplane flight over the Grand Canyon and Horseshoe Bend, upon landing at the Page Municipal Airport, you would then embark on a 4×4/hiking tour of Upper Antelope Canyon, then segue to the 1/2-Day Glen Canyon Raft Trip.
      That particular tour was unable to operate last year due to COVID-19 and the closure of the Antelope Canyons. Should that remain the case at the time of your visit, you do have alternatives, but they will take more time and involve a bit more driving on your part. Horseshoe Bend, first off, is one of the few attractions that never closed during COVID-19. It can be visited at your convenience during normal operating hours, which are sunrise to sunset.
      Slot canyons in the area that were also exempt from the closure of the Navajo Reservation are Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch, near Paria, UT, and Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Kanab, UT. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons in a short but memorable walk offering up classic slot canyon scenery, and some unique geological features, Red/Peek-A-Boo is the most family-friendly of the two afore-mentioned slot canyons. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you take one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is not difficult, the drive to get there is. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. Even then, experienced drivers get stuck out there on a daily basis. If you’re in a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. There are several reputable companies in Kanab, UT, that can get you to Peek-A-Boo Canyon, including:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      If you’d prefer something a bit more rugged, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. After paying your self-permitting fee at a well-marked kiosk, the walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, through deep sand. An 8-10’ makeshift ladder a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road, which is also unpaved. While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should automatically think twice about attempting this road. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Should the 1/2-Day Horseshoe Bend Raft Trip not be an option, the best alternative to it would be to drive to Lees Ferry (~1 hour from Page, AZ), rent a kayak, get backhauled to the base of the Glen Canyon Dam, then paddle the 15 miles back to Lees Ferry. This activity is mild enough for first-time kayakers, but again, may not be suitable for families with very young children or extreme seniors in tow. Local companies offering this service are:
      – Kayak Horseshoe Bend 928-355-2211 https://kayakhorseshoebend.com/
      – Wilderness River Adventures (928) 645-3296 https://www.riveradventures.com/
      – Kelly Outfitters/Lees Ferry Backhaul (928) 510-5511 http://www.kellyoutfitters.com/ http://leesferrybackhaul.com/
      – Kayak The Colorado 928-856-0012 https://www.kayakthecolorado.com/
      – Lees Ferry On The Fly (928) 326-1162 https://leesferryonthefly.com/
      – Marble Canyon Outfitters 800-533-7339 https://www.leesferryflyfishing.com/
      I know this is a lot to digest, but one more thing I must mention: should the closure of the Navajo Nation remain in effect at the time of your visit, you will face a longer drive than you expect from Grand Canyon Village to Page, AZ, or vice versa. The section of AZ64 from Desert View Point at Grand Canyon South Rim to Cameron, AZ, has been closed to minimize Navajo Reservation residents’ potential exposure to COVID-19. This critical component of the shortest travel route between Grand Canyon South Rim and Page, AZ, now makes it necessary to drive all the way down to Flagstaff, AZ, then proceed North via US89 to Page, AZ (or US89 South from Page, AZ, to Flagstaff, then US180/AZ64 or I40/AZ64 to Grand Canyon South Rim). This has turned what is normally ~a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive. Be sure you plan accordingly, and that your vehicle is fully fueled and that you carry adequate water and snacks to tide your family over between the Grand Canyon and Page.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hello Alley,

        My boyfriend and I are planning a trip to Grand Canyon and Page, AZ on Valentine’s day weekend. I was wondering if you had any tips on how to do this efficiently, if the shortest road was still closed to get from Grand canyon to Page, and also tips on what to do in Page besides Horseshoe Bend. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

        We are driving to Grand Canyon from high desert, CA area on Friday morning and staying there through Sunday. Leaving Sunday morning to Page, AZ for one night. Thank you again!

        1. Hi Julia,
          When I Google “High Desert, CA” the only location that comes up is near Irvine, CA, so I’ll go off the rough assumption that that’s where you’re coming from. The drive from there to Grand Canyon South Rim will take ~9-10 hours, factoring in bathroom breaks, meal and gas stops, etc. If the prospect of doing that much driving in one go doesn’t appeal, you might consider leaving a day early and breaking up the drive in Laughlin, NV, or Bullhead City, AZ.
          Unfortunately, your drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, will be affected by the closure of AZ64 from Desert View Point to Cameron, AZ. That means you’ll have to drive all the way down to Flagstaff, AZ, then bounce North again via US89 to Page, AZ. This has turned what is normally a ~3-hour drive into more like 5 hours. As for what there is to do in Page, AZ, besides visiting Horseshoe Bend, which will take ~2 hours of your time, you can:
          – walk the Page Rim View Trail
          – walk across the Glen Canyon Dam/Steel Arch Bridge
          – hike the Hanging Garden Trail & The Chains
          – visit the Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook
          – visit Grand View Overlook Park
          – take the short hike to The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
          Visit Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach (located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time)
          Visit Big Water Visitors Center & Dinosaur Museum (West of Page, AZ, on US89 in the town of Big Water, UT — can do this on the way out of town if desired)
          – Hike the Paria Rimrocks/Toadstool Hoodoos Trail (mile marker 19 on US89, between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT — above link also has information on this)
          Upon leaving Page, AZ, to return to California, here again, you’re looking at a long drive (~10-11 hours), so you might want to use Las Vegas, NV, as your half-way point on this leg of your trip. If you take me up on that suggestion, then consider making the short detour through the stunning Valley of Fire State Park just north of town. Winter is a really nice time to visit this area because it’s not so oppressively hot, like summertime.
          Trip map
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  23. Hello Alley,
    I’m interesting in visiting Horsebend towards the end of this month for my birthday. I’ve never been to this area, and interested in your lodging suggestions, and where would I fly into?

    1. Hi April,
      Horseshoe Bend is located approximately 5 miles South of the town of Page, Arizona, so that’s where you should stay.
      As for where to fly to, most visitors fly into either Phoenix, AZ, or Las Vegas, NV. Either airport is approximately a 5-hour drive from Page, AZ, and either one would make a good jumping-off point for a trip including Grand Canyon South Rim, Sedona, Zion, and/or Bryce Canyon.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Alley,
        I wanted to know if there would be a limit on the amount of people who are admitted to see/view the horseshoe bend?

        1. Hi Yvette,
          There is no “formal” capacity limit at Horseshoe Bend, after all, tour buses go there all the time … well, they used to, before COVID-19. Nevertheless, visitors are asked to take personal responsibility for mask wearing, social distancing, hand-washing, etc., if that is your concern.
          Your question actually piques my curiosity as to what you might be trying to accomplish at Horseshoe Bend. Are you thinking of having a large wedding or other special event there? If so, you’d need a special use permit from the National Park Service.
          If you simply are leading a tour group there, you would have to pay the appropriate entrance fee, determined by the capacity of your vehicle, upon entry to the parking area.
          Hope that answers your question. If it doesn’t, feel free to write in again.
          Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year!
          Alley 🙂

  24. Hi there,

    I’m travelling to Vegas & Arizona for the first time with my boyfriend. I’ll be exploring Canyon from 28th Nov & returning to Vegas on 30th.

    Could you please suggest what part of Canyon should be visit?

    I’ve read some of your replies. So much of information, thank you for helping 🙂

    1. Hi Aashna,
      I’m assuming that your inquiry is regarding December and not November?
      Whatever the case, we recommend that you visit Grand Canyon South Rim. That is the best place for first-time visitors since there are more in the way of tourist services, plus that’s where the best views of the canyon can be enjoyed.
      Grand Canyon South Rim is ~a 5-hour drive, one way, from Las Vegas. There are 6 hotels located inside the park, 5 in the community of Tusayan, 7 miles outside the park. Advance reservations for lodging are strongly recommended. Grand Canyon hotels
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays,
      Alley 🙂

  25. Hi. My fiancé and I are coming to do our New Years trip. We are flying in on the 30th. Planning on staying in Page, AZ on New Years Eve so we can do Horseshoe bend. What will be open New Years Eve and what is it like for covid? And is Horseshoe Bend safe at the moment to go due to the weather? Then headed down to the Grand Canyon. What tips can you give us. We are staying at the Grand Canyon Village in Tusayan. Is the Village open? What should we expect and pack for the weather clothing wise as well? We are ending our trip in Sedona! I came and did this ttrip three years with my friend but we did it in May. Not December/January. Please give me all the tips and tricks!!

    1. Hi Natasha,
      The first thing to be aware of is that you’re traveling in winter, and weather will be cooler than what you experienced on your previous trip. Conditions can range from sunny and brisk to all-out blizzard and everything in between. At the moment, no precipitation is expected in Northern Arizona until Tuesday 12/29, but that could change quickly. Weather conditions can also differ quite widely due to varying elevations of the sites you wish to visit: Page, AZ, is ~4,300′ above sea level, Sedona, AZ, is roughly the same, Grand Canyon South Rim is 7,000′ ASL, so the coldest weather, and greatest likelihood of precipitation, will occur there. I recommend monitoring the weather in all 3 sites before you get set to travel. That will give you the best idea of how to pack.
      One very major consideration in light of COVID-19 is that an integral component of the shortest travel route between Page, AZ, and Grand Canyon South Rim (AZ64 from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View Point on the South Rim) on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands is closed. This means that to get from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim requires that you drive all the way back to Flagstaff, AZ, then back up North to Tusayan via US180/AZ64 (or I-10/AZ64). This rather long but unavoidable detour has turned what used to be a 3-hour drive into more like a 5-hour drive. Be sure you plan accordingly.
      As for what’s open, Horseshoe Bend is definitely a “yes,” but the Antelope Canyons (also on Navajo Indian Tribal Lands) are closed. Other outdoor sights are pretty much open for visitation, including, but not limited to:
      Page Rim View Trail
      Glen Canyon Dam/Steel Arch Bridge
      Hanging Garden Trail & The Chains
      Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook
      Grand View Overlook Park
      The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
      Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach (located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time)
      Big Water Visitors Center & Dinosaur Museum
      Some local bars and/or restaurants will probably be open for New Year’s Eve but operating at reduced capacity and with mask requirements due to COVID-19. For more information on what’s open and what isn’t, inquire at your hotel or the local visitors center.
      Hope that helps and that you have a wonderful visit. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
      Alley 🙂

  26. Hello,

    I plan to visit stay in page one day. The available time to tour horseshoe bend area is from 9am to sunset. I read the comment that 2 hours would be enough to tour around horseshoe bend. can you recommend any other activities (scenic view, etc) for 1 day schedule?

    Thanks!

    1. Hi Henry!
      You are correct that 90 minutes to 2 hours is the recommended time to allot to visiting Horseshoe Bend. Unfortunately, the Antelope Slot Canyons are closed due to COVID-19, but there are enough sites still open available for sightseeing. You’ll have no problem filling your day!
      Areas you could visit include but aren’t limited to:
      Page Rim View Trail
      Glen Canyon Dam/Steel Arch Bridge
      Hanging Garden Trail & The Chains
      Glen Canyon Dam/White House Overlook
      Grand View Overlook Park
      The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
      Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach (located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which requires a $30/vehicle entrance fee, good for one week’s time)
      Big Water Visitors Center & Dinosaur Museum (~20 minutes from Page, AZ, just over the border of Utah)
      Hope that helps. Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
      Alley 🙂

  27. We are planning a trip between 23rd December and 29th and planning to visit horseshoe bend on Christmas day, will the park be open?
    Thanks

    1. Hi Arrowhee,
      Barring super-bad weather or any unforeseen circumstances, Horseshoe Bend will be open on Christmas Day. The entrance gate/parking fee both is open from sunrise to sunset, and the one-time parking fee for standard passenger vehicles is $10.
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays,
      Alley 🙂

  28. Hi Alley

    WOW you are super helpful on here! I am wondering if you could help me plan my Sedona, Grand Canyon, Flagstaff, possibly Page trip. I will be in Sedona at the end of December till the 3rd of January and would like to visit the Grand Canyon and maybe Horseshoe Bend if it is accessible. We will spend most of our time in Sedona and Flagstaff too. Any advice on must go places when we only plan to spend a day at the Grand Canyon or Horseshoe Bend? Since we will be in that area for NYE as well do you have any recommendations where we should spend it?

    Thanks in Advance!

    1. Hey Annette,
      Thanks for your compliments! They are very much appreciated 🙂
      If you were planning to use Sedona or Flagstaff, AZ, as a “base camp” from which to visit the Grand Canyon and/or Horseshoe Bend, you might want to rethink that: the drive from Sedona to Grand Canyon South Rim takes ~2.5 hours; from Flagstaff, AZ, it’s ~90 minutes. That’s 1 way. You’re also visiting at a time of year when your days are going to be very short: sunrise occurs just before 7:45 AM and sunset takes place at around 5:15 PM. That’s less than 10 hours of daylight, and you’re already proposing to use up 3-5 hours of it driving. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to the fact that local roads are very dimly lit, and you might encounter deer, elk, or other wildlife, which can hike up your risk of an accident. That’s not something you want to chance in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
      If you’re not locked into your hotel reservations in Sedona, I would strongly recommend booking lodging closer to the Grand Canyon (Grand Canyon Village or Tusayan) so you can be on the rim for sunrise and/or sunset.
      Visiting Page, AZ, requires another full day. If you were visiting as a day trip from Sedona, AZ, the drive would take you ~3 hours one way; from Flagstaff, the drive time is 2 hours and change (each way). You would then need at least 90 minutes, maybe 2 hours to visit Horseshoe Bend, and then you would probably want to get lunch at some point. That’s a lot of time behind the wheel just to go out to an overlook, grab a bite to eat, and not much else. Here again, booking lodging in Page, AZ, would allow you to get more out of your visit.
      For New Year’s Eve, I’d recommend spending that in Flagstaff, AZ, or Sedona, AZ. These areas will offer more in the way of bars and nightlife, contingent on the state not be locked down again due to COVID-19. If partying for NYE gets taken off the table by the powers that be, spend New Year’s wherever it’s convenient to do so.
      If you end up with another day to work with, the time of year you’re visiting is nice for going to Petrified Forest and the Painted Desert. That’s ~90 minutes one way from Flagstaff, AZ. If you’d prefer to stick closer to Sedona or Flagstaff, you might visit Montezuma’s Castle & Well and/or Tuzigoot National Monuments, or the ghost-town-turned-artist-colony, Jerome, AZ. Day trips from Sedona, AZ
      Trip map
      Hope that helps! Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays,
      Alley 🙂

  29. Hi Alley,

    I am planning a trip to see Horseshoe Bend as we will be staying in Page, AZ. The plan is to drive from Las Vegas to St. George and then over to Page. Do you think that will still be possible or will we have to go down south to Flagstaff?
    Also any recommendations on what else to visit nearby from Page.

    Thank you in advanced 🙂

    1. Hi Zaida,
      The most efficient way to drive from Las Vegas to Page, AZ, is via St. George, UT. It is not necessary to drive all the way down to Flagstaff, AZ, in your case, which is a very good thing LOL
      As for other activities/attractions you might visit while in Page, AZ, unfortunately, the Antelope Canyons are closed, but you can still visit the White House/Glen Canyon Dam Overlook, walk across the Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge, hike easy but scenic trails such as the Hanging Garden Trail or the “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock. Grandview Overlook Park and the Page Rimview Trail also make for a nice walk. If you are OK with paying the $30/vehicle entrance fee into Glen Canyon, you might venture down near the water’s edge at the Wahweap Swim Beach or Lone Rock Beach. The water is a bit too cold for swimming right now, but the scenery is still quite nice.
      If seeing a slot canyon remained high on your “to-do” list, the best alternative would be Red Canyon/aka Peek-a-Boo Canyon near Kanab, UT. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you consider taking one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. Reputable tour companies who can help you get to Peek-A-Boo Canyon are:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  30. Hi Alley,

    Thank you so much for all your insights, this site has been an invaluable resource as my family and I plan our visit to Page, Arizona and the surrounding area. We are coming into Page from Zion the week of Thanksgiving and I had a couple questions:

    1) We would love to visit Peek-a-boo/Red Canyon on the way from Zion to Page but we are making that drive on thanksgiving day and it seems like all the tours would be closed. Any recommendations on how to trek the 3 mile ride to the canyon? Are there 4 wheel drive rentals available in town or is our only option to walk those 3 miles?
    2) we were considering making a day trip to the east entrance of the Grand Canyon and catching a glimpse of it. Do you know if that is still an option with the covid road closures? Is there any option to see some of the Grand Canyon without that 5 hour drive?

    Thanks again for all your answers and linking the tour companies! It’s been super helpful.

    – Dullah

    1. Hi Dullah,
      You certainly do have a challenge to overcome with Peek-A-Boo Canyon. I checked with a few of the tour companies, and it does appear as though they are closed on Thanksgiving Day. Jeep rentals are available in the area, but this may not be the ideal solution either. The access road to Peek-A-Boo Canyon is quite sandy, and if you don’t have previous experience driving in that kind of terrain, you stand a fairly good chance of getting stuck. I know, the tour rescue people who get in trouble out there on almost a daily basis. If at all possible, I’d recommend trying to rearrange your trip plans so that you can enjoy the tour to Peek-A-Boo Canyon either the day before or after Thanksgiving.
      Unfortunately, I have more bad news: the East entrance of the Grand Canyon is not accessible due to the road from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View Point on the Navajo Reservation being closed. To drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim requires that you take a detour through Flagstaff, AZ, which is turned what is normally a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive. If doing this is not feasible or desirable, another way you might consider seeing the Grand Canyon would be to fly over it. Fixed wing airplanes depart out of the Page, AZ, Municipal Airport daily, weather permitting, and possibly contingent on a certain number of passengers traveling. For more information on Grand Canyon air tours from Page, visit Westwind Air Service.
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays,
      Alley 🙂

  31. Hello Alley,
    I’m planning to visit the following parks from Denver:
    1. Arches National Park
    2. Bryce Cayon
    3. Zion
    4. Antelope (I think it’s closed?)
    5. Horseshoe Bend
    6. The Grand Cayon

    I think I’ll stay in Page, Zion Area and Grand Cayon… Any recommendations??? It is going to be my first time there…

    Thank you

    1. Hi Leopoldo,
      It takes approximately 6 hours to drive from Denver, CO, to Moab, UT, which is the gateway community for both Arches and Canyonlands National Park. You should allow 3-4 days in that area, especially if your trip is scheduled to occur during the warmer months of the year. Bryce Canyon, the next stop on yur itinerary, is ~5 hours from Moab, UT, but if time allows, you should plan for at least an overnight Capitol Reef, which is about midway between Moab, UT, and Bryce Canyon. There is no lodging in the park itself, but the gateway communities of Torrey, Fruita, or Caineville have several motels. You should definitely plan on driving to Bryce Canyon via Scenic Byway 12, one of the most beautiful highways in the Southwest U.S. Bryce is small enough to where you can spend just 1 night there and have a perfectly enjoyable visit. Zion, on the other hand deserves at least 2-3 days, longer if you can swing it.
      You are correct in that the Antelope Canyons are closed. Should they remain closed at the time of year you’re visiting, good alternatives are Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT, or Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch near Paria, UT. For more details on these alternate slot canyons, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: “Help! My Tour Got Cancelled”
      For Horseshoe Bend, you should stay in Page, AZ. For the Grand Canyon, staying inside the park is most desirable. FYI, if your visit is occurring between now and the end of 2020, you’ll have to make a detour through Flagstaff, AZ, to get from Page, AZ, to the Grand Canyon. This is due to the road from Desert View Point to Cameron, AZ, on the Navajo Reservation being closed. This has turned what is normally a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive, so you’d probably want to stay at least 2 nights at the park.
      On the drive back to Denver, you could circle back to I-70 through Moab, UT, or go back through Telluride and Ouray. That’s a beautiful drive, too. Trip map
      Whatever you decide, be sure you book any hotels and guided tours well in advance.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  32. Hello,
    A friend and I will be road tripping from Phoenix to Page on the 7th just for one night. We were thinking about kayaking through antelope canyon but hesitant because of the weather. We are planning to watch the sunset at horseshoe bend Saturday night but anything else you recommend doing maybe Saturday during the day? Or Sunday? I was thinking stopping at the south rim on the way back home.

    1. Hi Amber,
      First off, I don’t recommend attempting to “stop at the South Rim on the way back home” to Phoenix from Page, AZ. The drive from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim normally takes ~3 hours, but due to the closure of AZ64 on the Navajo Reservation from Cameron, AZ, to Desert View because of COVID-19, it is now necessary to go all the way down to Flagstaff, AZ, then up to the South Rim via I40/AZ64 or US180/AZ64. This detour has turned a 3-hour drive into more like a 5-hour drive. You would then be facing another 5-hour drive down to Phoenix. Not my ideae of a fun day. Another thing working against you at that time of year is daylength; in November, it’s short, with sunrise taking place just before 7:00 AM and sunset occurring around 5:30 PM. This gives you 10.5 hours of daylight to work with, and you’re proposing to eat up 10 of those hours just driving. That doesn’t leave much time for sightseeing, plus you want to be sure that you do at least the first half of the drive back to Phoenix in daylight. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. The main reasons are that local roads are very dimly lit, plus the possible presence of large wildlife such as deer and elk, as well as free range livestock such as cattle and even wild horses ratchets up your risk of an accident. You don’t want to chance a collision with a large animal in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, possibly cold (nighttime temps are dipping down below freezing in the higher elevations), where cell service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Long story short, if you want to visit the Grand Canyon, best to spend the night there for optimal comfort and enjoyment.
      As for kayaking in Antelope Canyon, you are correct in that the weather may not be ideal for any kind of water-based activity. A quick check of Page, AZ, weather indicates that temperatures are supposed to drop over the weekend, with a chance of precipitation on Sunday. However, you’ll find plenty to see and do in the area to fill your day! You could drive down to the Glen Canyon Dam/Steel Arch Bridge and walk across that to get a nice view of Glen Canyon. Be sure to park your vehicle on the Eastern flank of the bridge so you can also hit the Chains and/or the Hanging Garden Trail if you want. In the town of Page, AZ, itself, the John Wesley Powell/Glen Canyon Conservancy Museum is open and the displays in there are very illuminating and informative. Although getting on the water may not happen this time around, you can still go down to the shoreline of Lake Powell by entering the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (if you’re OK with paying the $30/vehicle entrance fee; the National Park Pass also works). The Wahpweap Swim Beach and Lone Rock Beach both have great views, and actual access to the water. Airplane tours and helicopter tours are also operating, weather permitting, and contingent on a certain number of passengers traveling. Time permitting, you could also take the short drive over the border of Utah to the town of Big Water to view award-winning dinosaur displays. If seeing a slot canyon was high on your wish list, and kayaking doesn’t work out, you might consider taking a 4WD tour into the Cottonwood Wash Narrows. While this canyon is not as “slotty” as Antelope Canyon, it is still beautiful, as is the scenery of the surrounding terrain. For more information, visit Big Orange Jeep Tours
      Hope that helps; good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Ashley I’ve read your several comments and it’s very informative thank you.
        We are planning on a day trip to horseshoe bend and grandcanyon from Las Vegas NV.
        But when I looked up on map app it says it takes 3 hours to get ground Canyon from horse show bend .
        I was there 3 years ago and i remembered it was only an hour way??
        I don’t know if anything changed ? If you can give me an advice on our trip.

        1. Hi Akane,
          Sorry to say, but your memory is incorrect. It has always been ~3 hours, one way, from Horseshoe Bend (Page, AZ) to Grand Canyon South Rim or North Rim. Unfortunately, another kink has been thrown into the mix due to COVID-19: the Navajo Tribe has opted to close a critical section of the shortest travel route from Grand Canyon South Rim (the only side that’s open now) to Page, AZ. Therefore, it is now necessary to drive all the way down to Flagstaff, then proceed North to either Page, AZ, or Grand Canyon South Rim. This has turned what used to be ~a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive. For this and other reasons, we strongly discourage you from attempting to visit the Grand Canyon and HorseshoeBend as a day trip from Las Vegas. It will take you ~5 hours to drive from Las Vegas to Grand Canyon South Rim or Page, then you’re looking at another 5-hour drive to your next destination, then another 5-hour drive to get back to Las Vegas. That’s at least 15 hours of driving at a time of year (assuming your trip is taking place in the next few weeks) when you have maybe 12 hours of daylight to work with if you’re lucky. Trip map
          Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit, plus the possible presence of large wildlife such as deer and elk, as well as free range livestock such as cattle and even wild horses ratchets up your risk of an accident. You don’t want to chance a collision with a large animal in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, extremely cold (nighttime temps are dipping down below freezing in the higher elevations), where cell service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Long story short, if you want to visit Grand Canyon South Rim and/or Horseshoe Bend from Las Vegas, best to plan this as an overnight, preferably 2 night trip. Grand Canyon hotels
          Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays,
          Alley 🙂

          1. I you are amazing alley! I do remember it was so dark to get to lake Powell from Grand Canyon we were scared.
            We are reconsidering our trip now maybe just Grand Canyon now . Thank you so so much for your advice !
            P.S Sorry I miss typed your name .

          2. Hi again, Akane,
            Under the circumstances, that’s probably a good call. Hopefully you can plan a return trip for a time when COVID-19 isn’t casting a shadow over everyone’s fun.
            Take care and Happy Holidays,
            Alley 🙂

  33. Hi Alley,
    Me and friends are planning a 5 days trip going to Arizona to Utah then going back to Los Angeles. Any recommendation/advice. Thank you so much in advance.

    1. Hi Kathleen,
      Assuming your 5 days does not include travel from/to LA, here’s what I would recommend:
      Day 1: Begin by driving from LA to Grand Canyon South Rim (~8.5 hours), overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim
      Day 2: 2nd day/night at Grand Canyon South Rim
      Day 3: Drive to Page, Arizona ***unfortunately, the closure of a section of the usual drive due to COVID-19 necessitates a detour through Flagstaff, AZ, then back North on US89; this has rendered what is normally a 3-hour drive into a 5-hour drive*** overnight in Page, AZ
      Day 4: Visit Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning, then drive to Kanab, UT (~70 minutes), to tour Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Slot Canyon (if desired), then head to Zion National Park, overnight in Springdale, UT
      Day 5: 2nd day/night in Zion National Park, overnight in Springdale, UT
      Map of trip
      Day 6: Drive to Las Vegas (~3.5 hours from Springdale, UT) or drive back to LA (~7 hours from Springdale, UT)
      Of course, the feasibility of the above route is most dependent on hotel availability. If needed, you can also reverse this itinerary, hitting Zion first, followed by Page, AZ, and Grand Canyon South Rim. If you find you can squeeze an extra day in there somewhere, instead of going from Page, AZ, to Zion, you could visit Bryce Canyon (~3 hours from Page) for 1 night, then proceed to Zion before heading home.
      Very important that whatever you decide, you do all driving during daylight hours. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of large wildlife such as deer and elk, as well as free range livestock such as cattle and even wild horses. You don’t want to risk a collision with a large animal in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, possibly cold (nighttime temps can dip down below freezing that time of year), where cell service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
      Be sure that you reserve all hotels and guided tours well in advance of your arrival.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Alley,

        I am reading all these comments, and I am so impressed with your knowledge that I had to ask you some questions.

        My GF and I are thinking of visiting some national parks like Zion and red canyon. I am doing my research online, but not sure what sites I can trust to find out if roads are open or not. we will be driving from Los Angeles. I would like your recommendations/advice for a 5 day trip during thanksgiving weekend. we don’t have anything specific in mind, just to visit some cool national parks like Zion .

        thank you in advance.

        Pak.

        1. Hi Pak!
          First off, by “Red Canyon” I assume you’re talking about the slot canyon near Kanab, UT, that also goes by the name Peek-A-Boo Canyon. If so, that is a beautiful canyon that makes for a good alternative to Antelope Canyon since it’s closed due to COVID-19.
          Regarding road closures, there is one critical closure that must be factored into the plans of most vacationers in the Southwest U.S., and that’s AZ64 from Desert View Point at Grand Canyon South Rim to Cameron, AZ, on the Navajo Indian Reservation. This has necessitated extending the drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Horseshoe Bend from 3 hours to 5 hours due to the need to detour South through Flagstaff, AZ.
          For a 5-day trip, here’s what I’d recommend:
          Day 1: Drive from LA to Grand Canyon South Rim (~8 hours), overnight at Grand Canyon
          Day 2: 2nd day/night at Grand Canyon
          Day 3: Drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ (~5 hours, with the detour I mentioned), visit Horseshoe Bend, overnight in Page, AZ
          Day 4: Drive to Kanab, UT (~70 minutes from Page, AZ), tour Peek-A-Boo Canyon, then drive on to Zion National Park (~45 minutes from Kanab), overnight in Springdale, UT
          Day 5: Spend 2nd day/night in Zion, or drive back to LA (~7-8 hours from Zion)
          Bear in mind that in Zion National Park, use of a shuttle is required to access the Zion Canyon Drive, the main sightseeing area of the park. Due to COVID-19, capacity on the shuttle has been reduced to promote social distancing. You must purchase tickets for the shuttle in advance of your arrival through Recreation.gov, and frankly, I wouldn’t be surprised if they were already sold out for Thanksgiving weekend. That doesn’t mean you can’t still have a fun visit to that area, but you’d definitely have to temper some of your expectations. In light of that, you might consider skipping Zion this time around and maybe spending that time in Las Vegas, NV, with a detour through Valley of Fire State Park. VOF is a stunning area just a short distance out of the way between Zion and Las Vegas. Another alternative worth consideration might be Snow Canyon State Park near St. George, UT. Its rock formations have earned it the nickname “Little Zion” for good reason!
          One issue I haven’t addressed is weather: best case scenario, it could be sunny but cold, worst case, you could run into a blizzard. Start monitoring local weather about 5 days before you get ready to travel, and should you encounter a snowstorm during your travels, stay put and wait it out. Also, plan on doing any and all driving during daylight hours. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit, plus the possible presence of large wildlife such as deer and elk, as well as free range livestock such as cattle and even wild horses, ratchets up your risk of an accident. You don’t want to chance a collision with a large animal in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, extremely cold (nighttime temps are dipping down below freezing in the higher elevations), where cell service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
          Whatever you decide, be sure to reserve all hotels and guided tours ASAP. Thanksgiving is a popular time of year to visit the National Parks.
          Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
          Alley 🙂

  34. Hi Alley – We will be flying into Las Vegas the week of Thanksgiving. We are planning on visiting the south rim of the Grand Canyon, but were also interested in heading into Page to see Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon. I see that Antelope Canyon is closed at the moment. Any idea whether it will be open by late November? And, hoping that it is, are the visual effects of the sun through the canyon still as spectacular at that time of year? And if not (open), what other recommendations would you have for around Page?

    1. Hi Mark,
      Unfortunately, I have a bit of bad news for you: it was recently announced that Navajo Indian Tribal Parks will remain closed through the end of 2020, which means the Antelope Canyons won’t be an option. The local slot canyons are still beautiful in November, but you wouldn’t get the light beams you’ve no doubt seen photos of. That’s strictly a late spring through early fall phenomenon.
      If visiting a slot remains on your to-do list, there are a few options not subject to the closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Lands. The ones we recommend are Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT, and Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch near Paria, UT.
      Red Canyon is a beautiful slot canyon, and an easy walk, about 70 minutes from Page, AZ. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, and some features unique to it, the hard part about touring Peek-A-Boo is actually getting there. The access road to the slot canyon goes through a lot of deep sand, which a lot of people get stuck in, therefore, a guided tour is strongly recommended. Reputable tour companies who can get you to Peek-A-Boo are:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      If you’re up for something more rugged, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the first slot is via a typically dry streambed, usually full of deep sand. That and an 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is via the House Rock Valley Road, which is also unpaved, and any moisture whatsoever can render it a muddy, impassable mess. Therefore, a guided tour is recommended for getting your party there and back without incident. Companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Before committing to either of these, here’s another thing to consider: Normally, it would then take ~3 hours (one way) to drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ (or vice versa). However, because of COVID-19, an integral component of the shortest travel route between the two places has been closed to through traffic by the Navajo Tribe, which means you have to take a rather long detour from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, through Flagstaff, AZ. This has turned a 3-hour drive into more like a 5-hour drive. Then you have another hour to drive to Kanab, UT. Not the sort of thing I’d recommend attempting as a day trip.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  35. Hi,

    I’m planning a trip in a few weeks, with kids. I know we will be limited because of the kids but do you have any recommendations around Horsehoe bend that are kid friendly? Kids ages are 3, 4 and 10. 3 adults. Thank You!

    1. Hi Paulina,
      You are correct in that you will be somewhat limited with children that young, but you’ll be glad to know that there’s plenty to see and do, even with the Antelope Canyons closed.
      Horseshoe Bend should definitely be on your to-do list, with a few caveats: for one, the trail from the parking lot to the overlook is .7 miles one-way. Strollers can be managed on it, but the terrain might be a little rugged for that, it just depends on recent weather and use. Long story short, the kids should be prepared to walk, or you might have to carry them, all or part of the way. At the rim, there is a small viewing platform with a fence, but the majority of the ‘bend’s “real estate” is unfenced, and it’s a 700’ drop to the river. Be sure to keep a close eye on the kids near the edge!
      As for other things you might do, if visiting a slot canyon was something you had planned on, Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT (~70 minutes from Page, AZ), is still open, and smaller children are permitted on tours. Companies offering tours of Red Canyon are:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      If you were wanting to get down near the water, the Wahweap Swim Beach offers such opportunities, and you’ll even find picnic tables, shade ramadas, and BBQ grills nearby. It will probably be too cold to swim, but you can at east claim bragging rights to having dipped your feet in Lake Powell. Lone Rock Beach is also accessible, but you have to be careful not to drive too far into the sand or you might get stuck. FYI both of these areas are located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, meaning you’d have to pay the entrance fee.
      If any of the kids, or adults for that matter, are into dinosaurs, plan to visit the Grand Staircase-Escalante Visitors Center in Big Water, UT, ~20 minutes from Page, AZ, or on your way to Kanab, UT. Some of the dinosaur fossils on display were actually excavated in the local area.
      Hope that helps. Whatever you decide, be sure you make any and all hotel and guided tour reservations well in advance of your arrival.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  36. Hello, I am planing to visit this beautiful place, Horseshoe Bend on 9/29/20, can someone please tell me what time the park closes and until what time they let in the last person? Can we come in for sunset? How long is the hike from the parking Lot on Route 89? Any additional information would be much appreciated! Thank you!!

    1. Hi Natalia,
      The parking lot at Horseshoe Bend is open from sunrise (~6:15 AM) to just after sunset (~6:15 PM). You can come in for sunset, but I strongly advise arriving about 30 minutes prior as the light starts to change about then, and that way you have a better chance of catching the “starburst” phenomenon. That’s all I’m going to say about that 😉
      Anyway, the hike from the parking lot to the Glen Canyon Rim is ~.7 miles one way. The path is partially paved, partially graded. Although it’s advertised as being wheelchair and stroller accessible, recent reports assert it’s not to easy to navigate. Be sure to bring enough water for yourself and all members of your traveling party, maybe a light jacket, and to bring a flashlight in case it gets dark as you are walking back to the parking lot.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  37. Hello,

    Me and my partner is spending the night in Page after our day trip in Flagstaff. I have a few questions:

    1-We are probably arriving in Page after sunset and we’re looking for a site suitable for our camper van. Which place do you recommend that will accommodate us at the time we arrive and that is close to Horseshoe Bend and other scenic spots?

    2-We will be in Page for the day (but no later than sunset time) until we drive back to Flagstaff for the night. We know that Antelope Canyon is still closed. What do you recommend for things to do that is within the Horseshoe/Antelope area? Preferably easily accessible and with parking. Also, newbie roadtrippers here—can you advise us on where and what needs to be purchased in terms of permits and fees?

    Thank you so much in advance for all your advice! This site is super helpful!

    1. Hi Kendra,
      Since I don’t recall seeing when your visit is planned for, I’ll assume it’s happening in the immediate future.
      The nearest developed campground (aka, with electrical and water hook-ups) to Horseshoe Bend is the Page/Lake Powell Campground. While they are typically able to accommodate late arrivals, DO NOT assume you can stay there without a reservation. Even with COVID-19 going on, the Page, AZ, area has been surprisingly busy, and many hotels and tours are selling out. I recommend giving them a call at (928) 645-3374 to book a site, and inquire about office hours.
      Visit Horseshoe Bend first thing in the morning to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. As for other activities you can still enjoy in the Page, AZ, area, there’s no shortage things to see and do, even with the Antelope Canyons closed. You don’t need an advance permit for any of them; for Horseshoe Bend, there’s a one-time parking fee, which is collected upon entry. Should you wish to enter the Glen Canyonn National Recreation Area, there’s a $30/vehicle fee, which is good for one week’s time. Open/accessible attractions in the immediate area include:
      – Grandview Overlook Park
      – Wahweap Marina
      – Antelope Point Marina
      – The Chains & Hanging Garden Trail
      – Lone Rock Beach
      – Page Rim View Trail
      – The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock
      – Wahweap Overlook
      – Glen Canyon Dam Overlook
      – Alstrom Point
      – Skylight Arch
      – White Pocket
      – Wire Pass/Buckskin Gulch
      – Lees Ferry & Lonely Dell Ranch
      – Navajo Bridge & Interpretive Center
      – Glen Canyon Conservancy Flagship Store
      – Kayak Tours on Lake Powell & the Colorado River
      – Private Boat Charters
      – Airplane & Helicopter Tours
      – Glen Canyon Dam Steel Arch Bridge
      – Jeep/ATV Tours
      – Electric Mountain Bike Tours
      – Big Water Visitors Center (Big Water, Utah)
      – “The Moon” (Big Water, Utah)
      – Gunfighter Canyon Indoor Shooting Range
      Before I sign off, one thing I will caution you on is driving after dark. It’s not recommended in this part of the U.S. Roads around here are very dimly lit; that’s a deliberate move in most cases to preserve the natural darkness of the night sky. Another safety factor is the possible presence of deer, elk, and other animals such as free range cows, sheep, and goats, and even the occasional wild horse. Trust me, you don’t want to risk a collision with one in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, extremely cold (temps in Flagstaff are dipping down around freezing), where cell service is spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. If possible, try to adjust your schedule so that you are doing any and all driving during daylight hours. Sunrise occurs at around 6:15 AM; sunset takes place just after 6:15 PM.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  38. Hi
    We are planning to visit the week of thanksgiving from Texas. We will be flying in at Flagstaff and driving to Lake Powell Resort. We have one day for the Horseshoe Bend and the Lake Powell. We understand that antelope Canyon is closed due to COVID. What do you recommend for us to day ? Our family is big on photography. I saw in previous post of Peek a boo canyon. Is that worth the drive in the time we will have. We have planned a 7 days trip for Utah. Starting from Horseshoe Bend to driving to Monumental Valley & Gooseneck Park than to Moab with Canyonlands , Dead Horse and the Arches than to Goblin and Capital Reef and Finally end the trip with ZIon and Bryce. Your expertise for the area would be greatly appreciated .

    1. Hi Diba!
      First off, we’re crossing fingers and toes that the Antelope Canyons will reopen by Thanksgiving. As to whether it will happen is anybody’s guess, but you can get on a priority e-mail list to be notified if it does. If interested, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Antelope Canyon Reopening Alert
      If you only have one day allotted for Page, AZ, driving up to Kanab, UT, to tour Peek-A-Boo Canyon would take up the better part of that day. It takes ~70 minutes, 1-way, to drive from Page, AZ, to Kanab. Peek-A-Boo Canyon tours take anywhere from 3-4 hours. Then you’d probably want to get lunch or dinner somewhere, so there’s another 60-90 minutes gone.
      At first glance, that probably doesn’t seem like that big a deal, but the thing to keep in mind at the time of year you’re visiting is that days are rapidly shortening. Sunrise during Thanksgiving week occurs at around 7:15 AM; sunset takes place shortly after 5:00 PM. That means you have ~10 hours of daylight to accomplish a lot of sightseeing. Since the Horseshoe Bend parking lot opens right at sunrise, you could hit it first thing in the morning before heading to Kanab. You’d need to allow ~90 minutes to 2 hours to park, walk to the overlook, take photos, then walk back to your vehicle. You then have a 70-90 minute drive to Kanab, 4 hours for touring Peek-A-Boo, another hour or so for lunch or dinner, then another 70-90 minute drive back to Page. Any and all driving must be done during daylight hours in this part of the U.S. due to roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other large animals, which increases your chance of an accident. That’s not something you want to risk in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold (nights get down around/below freezing at that time of year), where cell service may be spotty, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
      Long story short, it can be done, but you’d be sacrificing a lot of opportunities in Page, AZ. If you decide to do this, you’d probably be best off staying overnight in Kanab, UT after touring Peek-A-Boo. Another option might be to tour Peek-A-Boo at some point between Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks. Kanab would be a relatively short detour off the route you’d have to take anyway, and Kanab, UT, makes for a good place to stay for visiting Zion.
      Should the closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Lands be extended further, you wouldn’t be able to tour the backcountry of Monument Valley, but you’d still be able to get good views of it en route to Moab, UT, on US163. Hopefully you’ve allowed 3 days for the Moab, UT, area, there’s a lot there to see! If you could possibly add another night or two to your vacation, that would allow you to enjoy things at a more relaxed pace. If, as you say, you’re “big on photography,” one thing I would like to suggest is taking Scenic Byway 12 from Capitol Reef to Bryce Canyon. It’s a stunning drive, rated as one of the most beautiful in the U.S.! It would add a bit of time to the trip, but most find it time well spent.
      Here’s what’s jumping out at me: the Grand Canyon is conspicuously absent from your itinerary. If you’re flying into Flagstaff, the South Rim is only a 90 minute drive away. If you’ve never been there, you should really try to carve out some time for it.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi DeAnn,
        My reply to Diba did indeed seem to imply that you could drive through Monument Valley without permission. I have edited it to be a bit more clear: since US163 from Kayenta, AZ to Bluff, UT, remains open, Diba could still get good views of Monument Valley driving past it en route from Page, AZ, to Moab, UT. One notable exception: Goulding’s Lodge remains open, and operating tours on modified routes. Other than that, you are correct, Navajo Indian Lands are closed to the public until further notice.
        Thank you so much for pointing this out.
        Alley

  39. Hi Alley,
    I decided to last minute visit the horseshoe bend on the day August 17th, is there anything else fun to do for the day? Is it worth it to visit lake powell? I’m coming from Las Vegas, NV and planning on driving home that same night.

    1. Hey Sam,
      Apologies for not replying to your inquiry in a more timely fashion. Hopefully you’ve sorted out the details of your last minute day trip to Horseshoe Bend, particularly the fact that it’s a 5+ hour drive, each way, from Las Vegas, NV, to Page, AZ. A better plan would be to spend the night in Page, AZ, and hit Horseshoe Bend at the best time of day: sunrise!
      As for other things you might do while visiting Page, AZ, you might walk across the steel arch bridge at the Glen Canyon Dam (the visitors center is closed due to COVID-19). If you’d like to enjoy a refreshing dip in the water, head down to The Chains. It is a bit of a hike to get back up from the waterline, but if you’re in decent health, you can probably manage it. If you’re feeling peppy after a swim at the Chains, you might also enjoy the short hike to the Hanging Gardens area. The springs are probably dry, but this is a neat little area, very unexpected to find in the desert.
      A short distance away, across the Glen Canyon Dam bridge, the “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock is a small but interesting cluster of rock formations, some of which resemble the Wave, but don’t require a permit to visit. Just bear in mind that there is also a campground in this area, so be sure that you don’t accidentally impede on someone’s space or privacy.
      Another thing: make sure you begin your drive back to Las Vegas well before sunset. Between Page, AZ, and St. George, UT, especially, local roads are very dimly lit and may be populated by deer, elk, free range cattle, feral horses and other wildlife that can ratchet up your risk of an auto accident. Trust me, you don’t want that to happen in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, where cell phone service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. Between St. George, UT, and Las Vegas, NV, is more heavily populated, so you’ll have more (and bigger) city light domes to illuminate your way. Sunset this time of year occurs shortly after 7:00 PM, so recommend you get on the road by 4:30-5:00 PM at the absolute latest.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  40. Hello,
    My families are planning travel to Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe in Labor Day weekend – Do you know if Antelope Canyon will be open for tour at that time yet? If I want to book tour for Horseshoe then which tour you recommended? Which area that we should visit for our trip. Our group will be around 20+ people, we have about: 15 adults, 5 kids 5-10 years and 3 children 2-3 years old. We are coming from Hurricane, Utah for 1 day visit. Thank you so much

    1. Hi Jennie!
      The closure of Navajo Indian Tribal Parks was recently extended through August 16th. As to whether it will be extended beyond that is unclear; hopefully you will be able to tour Antelope Canyon when you visit on Labor Day. Nevertheless, you should be thinking of a “Plan B” in case it is not. “Help! My Antelope Canyon Tour Got Cancelled” Another consideration: because you have toddlers in your party, you are going to be somewhat limited in what tours you can/should take. If the Antelope Canyons reopen by the time you visit, Upper Antelope Canyon will be the best choice for your group. If it is not, then Red Canyon aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Kanab, UT, would be your next best alternative. Car seats will most likely be required for the younger kids.
      As for Horseshoe Bend, a tour is not required to visit there. The parking lot is open from sunrise to sunset. We recommend visiting just after sunrise to enjoy cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
      The drive from Hurricane, UT, takes approximately 2.5 hours, each way. That’s going to make for an awfully long day for your family, especially the younger children. If you possibly can, reconsider this plan and stay overnight in Page, AZ. If that is not possible, be sure that you time your return drive so that you’re not doing any of it at night. The route is very dimly lit, and extremely remote, and may be populated by deer, elk, free range cattle, and other large animals that pose a collision risk in an area where cell phone reception is spotty and help will be a long time coming, not to mention very expensive. What’s more, Hurricane, UT, will be on Mountain Daylight Time, but Page, AZ, will be on Mountain Standard Time, meaning that Hurricane, UT, is one hour ahead of Page, AZ. You’ll need to factor that in when deciding when to head back to Hurricane. Sunset on Labor Day weekend occurs at ~7:45 PM Utah time, 6:45 PM Arizona time, so that means you’ll need to start heading back to Hurricane by 4:30 PM (Arizona Time) at the latest.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hello Alley,

        This website is AWESOME! My friend and I are thinking of visiting Horseshoe Bend between August 20-23. What time is best to arrive at Horseshoe Bend in order to find parking? Also, how long is the hike from the parking to the Horseshoe Bend?

        We would also love to visit Antelope Canyon however I see that it remains closed due to COVID. If it opens by next week, do we need to make a reservation ahead of time?

        Lastly, which other hiking places do you recommend near Horseshoe Bend?

        Thank you! 🙂

        1. Hi Lauren, and thanks for your compliments on our website!
          In the hot months of late summer/early fall, we recommend arriving at Horseshoe Bend in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds. At the time of year you’re visiting, sunrise occurs just before 6:00 AM. The trail to the overlook, which has recently been flattened, graded and partially paved, is .7 miles 1 way.
          Unfortunately, we don’t anticipate the Antelope Canyons reopening by the time you visit. If, by some miracle, they do, you’d definitely need an advance reservation as people are going to be chomping at the bit to visit. In the likely event the Navajo slot canyons remain closed, we recommend visiting Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT, ~90 minutes from Page, AZ. While a tour is not 100% required to visit Peek-A-Boo, we recommend taking one because the access road to get out there goes through some very deep sand. People get stuck out there all the time, resulting in a hefty tow fee. For more information on slot canyon tours to Red/Peek-A-Boo Canyon, read this piece on our companion site, “http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Help! My Antelope Canyon Tour Got Cancelled”
          As for other good hikes around Page, AZ, you can take your pick of hikes ranging from easy to difficult, through a variety of scenery. The Page Rim View Trail is a fun one, it circumnavigates Manson Mesa, where the townsite of Page, AZ, is situated. It’s 10 miles long, but you don’t have to commit to the entire length of it. There are several spur trails which enable you to get off it at pretty much anytime. The trail features nice views of Lake Powell, but no lake access.
          You can also walk across the bridge at the Glen Canyon Dam, and if you’d like to enjoy a refreshing dip in the water, head down to The Chains. It is a bit of a hike to get back up from the waterline, but if you’re in decent health, you can probably manage it. If you’re feeling frisky after a swim at the Chains, you might also enjoy the short hike to the Hanging Gardens area. The springs are probably dry, but this is a neat little area, very unexpected to find in the desert.
          A short distance away, across the Glen Canyon Dam bridge, the “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock is a small but interesting cluster of rock formations, some of which resemble the Wave, but don’t require a permit to visit.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  41. Hey!

    We are looking at doing a big road trip from Texas for New Years. As of right now I’m planning on coming from New Mexico. We will stay the night in Page, and hopefully get to see Antelope Canyon and Horse Shoe Bend. I read in a previous comment you recommended Red Canyon, or Peek-a-Boo in Kenab, Ut. Logistically could we do Horse Shoe Bend, and Red Canyon in one day and still be able to drive up to Bryce to stay? Or should I plan on staying in Kenab for the night.
    Just trying to wrap my head around the area.
    Thank you so much!

    1. Hey Kristen!
      At the time of year you’re traveling, you need to be prepared for cold weather, up to and including snow. That could affect your plans, so keep a close eye on it in the various places you go. I have family in Austin, TX, so I’ve made the drive from Texas to Page, AZ, several times at that time of year. We typically break the drive into two days. If winter weather is a threat, I recommend traveling via I-10 to Tucson, overnighting in Las Cruces, NM (the Best Western propert there is nice). If weather is expected to be good, head up to I-40, maybe break up the drive in Albuquerque, NM.
      If the closure of Antelope Canyon is extended through New Years (which we certainly hope won’t happen!), you could hit Horseshoe Bend right at sunrise, which takes place at around 7:30 AM. Allow approximately 2 hours to walk out to the overlook, take photos and walk back. The drive to Kanab, UT, would take ~90 minutes, and your tour company will probably require that you check in at least 30 minutes prior to departure. You’d probably want to get lunch beforehand, so that will eat up 60-90 minutes right there; we recommend the Kanab Creek Bakery 😉 Tours to Red/Peek-A-Boo Canyon are 3 hours in length, and sunset at Bryce Canyon takes place at 5:30 PM. Overnighting in Kanab, UT, would be the safest bet so you’re not doing any of the drive at night. Then you can start fresh the next morning for Bryce, which is about a 90-minute drive from Kanab. Page, AZ, to Bryce Canyon, UT, via Kanab
      Hope that helps you get a sense of drive times and logistics! Please feel free to write in again if you need further guidance.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  42. Hi was wondering if Wednesday July 8th , will horseshoe bend still be open for a sunrise hike ? Or will it be affected by the wildfires?

    1. Hi Alina,
      Horseshoe Bend happily has not been affected by wildfires in the area, so we fully expect it to be open on July 8th!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

        1. Hi Fernanda!
          This is an excellent question — fortunately, the answer is “no,” reservations are not required to park at Horseshoe Bend.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

  43. Hi!
    We are planning to go to Page, Arizona this 4th of July weekend. Just want to know what state parks are open now that your governor orders closure again of bars, clubs etc. for the next 30days.
    Thank you.

    1. Hi Cez,
      Hope you’re looking forward to your trip to Page, AZ, for 4th of July weekend. We are very sorry that you won’t be able to partake of bars, clubs, and other nightlife while you’re here, but we’re confident you can find other ways to enjoy your visit.
      Fortunately, the majority of National Parks, Arizona State Parks and Utah State Parks remain open, including the Grand Canyon, Lake Powell, Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon, etc. It’s probably best to list the few that are closed, which are:
      Navajo Nation Tribal Parks – the Antelope Canyons, Monument Valley, Four Corners Monument, Canyon de Chelly, Antelope Point Marina, and Canyon de Chelly
      The Paria Canyon/Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area – Coyote Buttes North/South, The Wave, House Rock Valley Road, which was closed as of Friday June 26th due to a wildfire; as of this morning, the Wire Pass Fire is 70% contained, so the trails are expected to reopen on Wednesday
      Visitor Services on Grand Canyon North Rim – this park itself is open only for day use; all visitor services facilities are closed
      As for things you might do during the evening hours that don’t involve bars or restaurants, you could enjoy a sunset stroll on the Page/Lake Powell Rim View Trail, or watch the sun go down from the vantage point of the Wahweap Overlook, Horseshoe Bend, or the Glen Canyon Dam Overlook.
      On the 4th of July, be sure to bring a lawn chair and mask up so you can enjoy Page, AZ’s world-famous fireworks display along with the locals!
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  44. Hi Alley,

    I am trying to plan a trip to Utah’s Zion and Bryce Canyon Parks in UT, before driving to see the Horseshoe Bend in AZ. The trip will be in a campervan from Las Vegas, NV, and preferably spend nights boondocking from Tuesday thru Saturday. Do you have a suggestion as far as breaking the trip up?

    For sure, The Narrows and Sand Beach at Zion are on the list. Peek-A-Boo Loop and probably Sheep Creek for Bryce are also on the list.
    Any more suggestions or sight seeing around Page, AZ, since the Horseshoe Bend shouldn’t take much time?

    1. Hi Yariam,
      The best way to break up the trip would be to stay as close as possible to the parks you wish to explore. However, if you limit yourself to boondocking (free camping), you will place yourself some distance away from the main attractions. Within the National Park boundaries, you must pay for either an RV site or a campsite. If you wish to save that money for souvenirs, tours, or other things, dispersed camping is allowed in several areas, including one that makes for a nice “centralized” base camp from which to tour Zion and Bryce: Mt. Carmel Junction, near Kanab, UT. For more information on these and other possibilities for boondocking, visit Campendium.com: Free Camping Near Zion National Park
      Seeing as though Mt. Carmel Junction and Kanab, UT, are just a short drive from Page, AZ, you might just plant yourself up there for the duration of your stay and make day trips. If that does not appeal, unfortunately, free camping opportunities are a bit fewer and further between in Page, AZ, but the price you’d pay for a campsite would more than pay for itself in convenience. The Lone Rock Beach campground does require that you pay the National Park entrance fee, but in exchange, you get great views of Lake Powell, and easy access to take a quick swim should the mood strike. Ditto for the Wahweap Campground, which is also walking distance from the Lake Powell Resort complex should you fancy a cold beer or a meal out. If being near the water isn’t a huge priority, the Beehive Campground may do the trick for you. Again, it’s not free, but this small dry camping area is adjacent to an easy but interesting hike known as the “New” Wave and/or Radio Tower Rock.
      Since the Antelope Canyons are closed due to COVID-19 at the moment, another good slot canyon to explore, that lo and behold, has a free camping area right next to it, is Wire Pass Canyon. Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which may feature deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. However, you are allowed to camp just across from the Wire Pass trailhead, or, if you want something with more in the way of “amenities,” the Stateline Campground is just down the road a bit and has 7 sites with a pit toilet and a shade structure. Last but not least, there’s always the parking lot of the local Super Wal-Mart!
      One last thing: if your visit is occurring between now and say, mid-September, you must know that you’re traveling during the hottest months of the year. Boondocking may not be realistic or comfortable since nighttime lows don’t get much below 70 and you’re basically proposing to sleep in a tin can sitting in the sun. You might want to spring for a hotel; believe me, you’ll appreciate having access to air conditioning when the daytime high temp is expected to tempt the 110 degree mark! Page, AZ, hotels
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  45. Hi Ally,
    We are going to come up early on 10/18 from the south rim. Would like to do the Upper and Lower and Horseshoe. What is the weather like in October? Also, really weird question… one person is deathly afraid of snakes and will not join us. Does she need to worry about this? Also, are all 3 parks only hiking or are there any scenic byways?
    Jill

    1. Hi Jill,
      You’ve chosen a great time to visit the American Southwest! Let’s just hope that things are back to some semblance of normalcy by then, especially regarding the Antelope Canyons (they’re closed until further notice due to COVID-19).
      October weather is about as close to picture-perfect as you can get! Temperatures are cooling, with average daytime highs in Page, AZ, in the 70’s and 80’s (vs. upwards of 100 right now!), and while tourist attractions are still busy, traveling parties tend to consist of mostly adults as kids are back in school.
      As for “scenic byways,” pretty much all roads out here are very scenic, even if they’re not formally designated as such. Horseshoe Bend and the Antelope Canyons, however, must be hiked to (or through, as it were). They cannot be seen from the road at all. Should the Antelope Canyons be reopened by the time you visit, we recommend booking tours of Upper and Lower Antelope Canyon as a “bundle” for optimal convenience. Should they still be closed at the time of your visit, a good alternative would be Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT (not to be confused with another Peek-A-Boo Canyon in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument!) This family-friendly slot canyon is located approximately 90 minutes from Page, AZ. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, it’s a short but memorable walk offering classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you consider taking one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. Reputable companies that can get you out to Peek-A-Boo in safety and comfort are:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      On the subject of snakes, it’s highly unlikely that your ophidiophobic friend should encounter one, especially in October. Being cold-blooded, snakes tend to be out and about during the hot months of summer. Even then, sightings are rare, and “close encounters” are even more so. The majority of problems experienced by people and snakes tend to be what we affectionately call “testosterone poisoning.” Guy A dares Guy B to pick up that snake, Guy B says “hold my beer” and the rest, as they say, is history. Hope that convinces him/her to join you. They’ll really be missing out if they don’t!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  46. Hi Alley
    My family planning a road trip from Orange county CA to lake Powell for 5 days on July 17- 21. Do you have any suggest scenery route ? where to stay?
    we want to see horse shoe bend, Antelope Canyon (hopefully is open ) and the lake. Thank you for your helps.
    Wendy

    1. Hi Wendy,
      If you’re coming from Orange County, you’re looking at at least 9-10 hours to make the drive to Page, AZ. The “scenic” route will take you through Las Vegas, NV, which might be a good place to break up the drive. The following day, you’d pass through St. George, UT, and Kanab, UT. You will be right in the vicinity of Zion National Park, which is definitely worth a stop, if not at least making time to drive through.
      Since it is very likely that the Antelope Canyons will be closed at the time of your visit, a good alternative would be Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon in Kanab, UT (not to be confused with another Peek-A-Boo Canyon in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument!) This family-friendly slot canyon is located approximately 90 minutes from Page, AZ. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, it’s a short but memorable walk offering classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you consider taking one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. Reputable companies that can get you out to Peek-A-Boo in safety and comfort are:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      Plan on visiting Horseshoe Bend in the hours just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and fewer people.
      As for where to stay in Page, AZ, the town has many hotels to choose from in a variety of price points and amenity classes. Choose whatever fits your budget, and has availability. Although some facilities and attractions are closed due to COVID-19, on-site reports indicate that there are still many tourists visiting Lake Powell and the surrrounding area.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  47. Hello I am planning a road trip from Los Angeles to Zion for two nights, one night in Bryce Canyon, one night in Page and one night in Sedona. Do you have any tips on things to do or see? I did see the alternative suggestions for Antelope Canyon but I don’t have a 4×4 vehicle are there any slot canyon hikes that do not require that type of vehicle? I read that the scenic drive for Zion gets closed off pretty early, are there alternative ways to enter the park to do the available hikes?

    1. Hi Amanda,
      You are correct in that the Zion Canyon Scenic Drive gets full pretty early in the day. Normally I would suggest hiking to Observation Point and/or Hidden Canyon, but that trail is closed due to a rockfall. In light of that, you might take a bit of a detour and access the park via the Kolob Reservoir Road, aka the Kolob Terrace Road, 25 miles from the town of Virgin, UT. Great views, fewer people, what’s not to like about that? If you have your heart set on seeing the picture postcard views of Zion without the hassle, you might consider flying over it. Fixed-wing airplanes depart daily (weather and requisite number of passengers permitting) out of the Hurricane, UT, airport ~30 miles from the Western border of the park. If you want to explore similar scenery, even if it’s technically outside of Zion National Park, you might consider hitting Snow Canyon State Park or the Red Cliffs Recreation Area. Zion National Park Alternatives
      As for getting to local slot canyons outside of the Antelope Canyons, unpaved roads are pretty much a given. If you don’t have a 4×4 vehicle, your best bet is to go with a guided tour. Red Canyon aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon (not to be confused with Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Escalante, UT!) would be the one I’d recommend to most visitors. This beautiful slot canyon, with twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, is located near Kanab, UT, ~1 hour from Page, AZ. It’s a short but fun walk featuring classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you utiize one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. There are several reputable companies to choose from in Kanab, UT, including:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      In Page, AZ, Horseshoe Bend and Lake Powell are the ‘must-see’ attractions. In Sedona, there’s no shortage of great stuff to see and do! Our recommendations:
      the Pink Jeep Broken Arrow Tour
      sunrise hot air balloon rides
      wine tastings
      day trips to Jerome, AZ, former ghost town turned artist colony
      Verde Canyon Railway
      Montezuma Castle/Well National Monument
      Tuzigoot National Monument
      Slide Rock State Park
      On second thought, you may want to add a second night onto Sedona, or perhaps a third 😉
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Feiga,
        Boy, this is a loaded question. Northern Arizona and Southern Utah offer a lot to see and do! Not knowing how much time you have, or whether you’re flying or driving out, it’s hard to list the “most important places.” If you are not limited by time constraints, however, I’d recommend hitting the following:
        1. Grand Canyon National Park (South Rim)
        2. Page, Arizona (for Horseshoe Bend, the Antelope Canyons, Glen Canyon/Lake Powell)
        3. Zion National Park
        4. Bryce Canyon National Park
        5. Capitol Reef National Park
        6. Moab, Utah (for Arches/Canyonlands National Park)
        Again, this is just a bare-bones outline of the most iconic locales in the Grand Circle area. If you are limited on time, however, I’d recommend prioritizing the Grand Canyon over everything else, then heading to Page, AZ. Ultimate 7-Day Trip to the American Southwest
        Feel free to write in again if you need further guidance.
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

  48. Hi 🙂

    Me and my friend are planning to drive to Utah, Arizona and California. We were thinking to visit Bryce Canyon, Zion National Park, Horseshoe bend, grand canyon and Joshua tree all in 4 days ( July 2nd to 5th). not sure if it is possible 🙂 do you have any recommendations?

    1. Hi Rayehe,
      Is it possible? Yes. Is it the best way to go? No.
      This plan will have you doing a lot of driving and enjoying very little quality time.
      Assuming you’re planning on visiting these attractions in the order you list them, let’s break it down stop by stop:
      From Bryce Canyon to Zion is about a 2-hour drive, but that’s wheels turning, no stops. That rarely happens since the drive is very scenic and you will be stopping to take photos more often than you realize! Plus, you should allocate some time to do at least minimmal hiking in Bryce Canyon, preferably during the cooler early morning hours. The Mt. Carmel Tunnel, which you’ll probably end up passing through, delays most drivers as traffic is occasionally reduced to one-lane to accommodate RV’s and larger vehicles. Since the shuttles aren’t running, you’ll be able to drive to most areaas, but finding a place to park will be a challenge. Then there’s the matter of where will you stay? Springdale, UT, on the Western border of the park is where most Zion National Park visitors stay, but since you’re doing this loop in reverse order, I’d recommend Kanab, UT, on the Eastern border of the park, ~45 minutes from Zion. Since Kanab, UT, is centrally located to both Bryce and Zion, you might simply book 2 nights there for optimal convenience.
      Horseshoe Bend is located near the town of Page, AZ, approximately 90 minutes from Kanab, UT. The Antelope Canyons, another popular attraction in the area, are closed due to COVID-19 unfortunately, but there’s still enough to do to justify staying a night in this area. A visit to Lake Powell to enjoy a refreshing swim is definitely a must during the hot days of summer, then plan to hit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise the next morning to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
      Now, here’s where things get tricky: due to COVID-19, the Navajo Tribe has opted to close the section of AZ64 from Cameron to Desert View Point. This is typically the route visitors take from Page, AZ, to Grand Canyon South Rim. The trip typically takes ~3 hours, but due to this closure, you’ll have to go all the way down to Flagstaff, AZ, then take US180 back up North to Grand Canyon South Rim. This will lengthen the drive time to ~4-4.5 hours at best. After a drive of that length, you should definitely plan to stay overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim. Since the park is probably sold out, Tusayan, AZ, or Williams, AZ, will most likely be where you can most easily find lodging.
      The drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Joshua Tree will the longest of your trip, ~6-6.5 hours. Since there are no hotels inside the park itself, you’ll probably have to look to nearby communities such as Indio, Apple Valley, 29 Palms, etc. Joshua Tree Hotels Here again, because the weather is very hot at this time of year, hiking or any other labor-intensive activities should be undertaken during the early morning hours for safety and comfort.
      Long story short, you can pull this off in 4 days, but if you can possibly free up 2-3 more days, that will enable you to take things at a slower pace and enjoy and explore things more fully.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley Keosheyan 🙂

  49. Does the horseshoe bend parking lot gate open and close at specific hours? I see hours for the visitor center, but will we get locked in if we aren’t out when the center closes?

    1. Hi Bella,
      The Horseshoe Bend Parking Lot is open from sunrise to sunset. There is no visitors center there (yet). As for whether you’d get locked in, that’s unlikely to happen. The staff always makes a sweep of the parking lot and overlook to ensure that everyone vacates the area in a timely manner and orderly fashion.
      Alley

  50. Hello! Is Horseshoe bend stroller friendly? We will be coming from the DFW area with our little kids. Anything else besides Horseshoe bend in the area that is kid friendly? My kids love exploring and going on new adventures.

    1. Hello Ash,
      The trail to the Horseshoe Bend Overlook is partially paved and partially graded, so strollers should be able to navigate it, but the unpaved portion may get a bit dodgy if recent weather has been wet. If that’s the case, be prepared to carry your little ones, or have them walk part of it.
      As for other activities and attractions in the area that are kid-friendly, a visit to popular swimming areas such as The Chains, Wahweap Swim Beach and/or Lone Rock Beach are open and would make for a fun way to round out your day. The Chains is located outside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so no entrance fee is required; Wahweap Swim Beach and Lone Rock Beach are both located inside the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, so an entrance fee is required to visit those areas. Again, sun exposure is an important consideration at these areas, so be prepared to protect yourself and your family with plenty of sunscreen, water, hats, protective clothing, etc.
      If your kids are into dinosaurs (and what kids aren’t?), a short drive up the road to Big Water, Utah, and the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Visitors Center would be in order. The dinosaur museum tends to be a big hit with the kiddos!
      If you take us up on the latter suggestion, a stop you might also make between Page, AZ, and Big Water, UT, is the “New” Wave, aka the Beehives, and take the short walk to Radio Tower Rock. If your visit is taking place over the summer months, remember that all outdoor activities involving physical exertion are best undertaken during the cooler hours of the day just after sunrise. Water must be carried for all party members, and sun protection such as hats, sunglasses, sunscreen, and closed-toed shoes should be worn.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  51. Hi Alley,

    I plan on visiting Horseshoe Bend in two weeks and I was hoping to make a quick trip into Utah (just so I can say I’ve been there:). Is there a place you recommend going to just over the border that’s not too far from Page?

    1. Hi Caroline!
      Great question 😉
      Fortunately, you needn’t go far from Page, AZ, to secure “bragging rights” for having been to Utah.
      Simply drive to the town of Greenehaven, AZ, near Lone Rock Beach, a quick 15 minutes West of Page, AZ, and you’ll see the “Welcome to Utah” sign in all its glory! Be prepared to wait for other parties wanting to snap a picture of themselves near the sign.
      If you’re willing/able to drive a little further, go a few more miles into Utah to the town of Big Water and pay a visit to the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Visitor Center. They have some awesome displays of dinosaurs, some of which were excavated in the local area!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

  52. We are trying to plan a two week road trip throughout Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and New Mexico hitting whichever parks are open. How could I see horseshoe bend? Are there any other slot canyons like antelope canyon that will be open that I could try to see? We are coming the first part of June.

    1. Hi Brandi,
      This is a great question!
      Fortunately, Horseshoe Bend is one Northern Arizona attraction that never closed throughout the COVID-19 shutdown. It is open from sunrise to sunset. Since Page, AZ, weather is heating up in earnest at the time of your visit, we recommend hitting the overlook just after sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and smaller crowds.
      In the event the Antelope Canyons are closed at the time of your visit — and there’s a good possibility that they will be — other slot canyons in the area you might consider visiting are Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch, between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on US89; Red Canyon, aka Peek-a-Boo Canyon, near Kanab, UT, Spooky Gulch and/or Zebra Slot Canyon near Escalante, UT, Leprechaun Canyon near Hanksville, UT, and last but not least, Kanarra Falls, near Cedar City, UT. All the afore-mentioned slots, with the notable exception of Kanarra Falls, do not require an advance permit, but may require a nominal entrance fee.
      Hope that helps!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  53. Hi Alley,

    I am from California and would like to go to the Grand Canyon ( not sure which one is open, I think Its South RIM)and the Horseshoe bend this weekend. It will be me an my two adult children. We will be leaving Friday 05/22 evening returning Sunday 05/24 any recommendations on this trip. I have no itinerary. Looking for ideas of place to stay and possibly places to see on out way up there.

    1. Hi Angel,
      First of all, Grand Canyon South Rim is only open on a limited basis: entry will be granted between the hours of 4:00 AM and 10:00 AM from Friday May 22nd to Monday May 25th. I’m not sure which part of California you’re coming from, but if you’re traveling from Los Angeles, CA, for example, it will take you approximiately 8 hours to drive to Grand Canyon South Rim. You’d need to depart just after midnight in order to make it to the park by the time they close the gates. Another “wrinkle:” all lodging within the park is closed, and only a few food and beverage outlets will be open. For more information, visit NPS.gov: Grand Canyon Public Health Update
      Yet another complication is that the East gate of the park at Desert View Point is closed, and travel within the Navajo Indian Reservation is highly discouraged. Unfortunately, this is pretty much impossible to avoid if you want to travel from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, to see Horseshoe Bend. Although the road is not blocked off, you may be stopped and asked to wear a face mask until you arrive on non-reservation land. This is going to require getting a little creative with your itinerary and lodging.
      Upon leaving the Grand Canyon, you might want to stay in Flagstaff, AZ, which is 90 minutes South of the park. The drive to Page, AZ, the next day will take approximately 2.5 hours. Unfortunately, the Antelope Canyons are closed until further notice, but the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area/Lake Powell is open, so you can drive in and enjoy the lake either from the shore or take a swim on one of the beaches. Stay in Page, AZ, that night, then traveling back to California, I recommend swinging North of the Grand Canyon and maybe taking a detour through Zion National Park, time and desire permitting. That way, you don’t have to backtrack through the Navajo Indian Reservation.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  54. Hi from Scotland, UK

    Love all of the info, links and photos.
    We’re supposed to be going back to USA for a 4 week long road trip from June 29th – we had been planning on going back to many of the places listed……however, with the way things have gone over the past several weeks, we’re not holding out much hope at all of getting back to the USA this year. Been counting the days / sleeps since we booked up again last year (quite sad, I know !).
    However, as much as it’s a real pain in the backside for us, there are much more important things to be dealing with these days.
    If it doesn’t actually happen for us this year, hopefully we’ll get back to the beautiful country some day soon, as we just can’t get enough of the place !!!

    Most importantly, stay safe everyone.

    1. Hi Gerry,
      Thank you for your patience and realism in this very difficult time. We hope you are able to return to the US as planned next month. The Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (Lake Powell) is planning to implement a “phased” reopening of some facilities later this month. Unfortunately, lodging and restaurants aren’t among them, but by June, that could change.
      Stay well and let us know how things work out,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Hi Alley

        The bad news came……….pretty much as expected. 🙁

        To make matters worse, I’ve been having to cancel about 13 accommodations for our trip that’s no longer happening as well, and car rental, etc….
        Heart-breaking, but hopefully we’ll get back to USA at some point in the future……..just not this year…….

        Hopefully you’ll know that I don’t mean this in any kind of bad way at all, but as sad as this will sound, I kind of hate the fact that I love America so much…..if you know what I mean…..

        Take care.
        Gerry

        1. Hi again, Gerry, and thank you for the update.
          We’re so sorry that your long-awaited Southwest vacation has had to be postponed, but, better safe than sorry, I suppose.
          We look forward to hosting you and your family when the time is right!
          Alley 🙂

      2. Hi Alley,

        We live in Phoenix, AZ and would love to come up for some hiking. Is Horseshoe Bend open currently?

        1. Dear Kerstin,
          Horseshoe Bend is currently open, and the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area/Lake Powell is scheduled to begin a phased reopening of facilities such as lodging, restaurants, and activities in the days and weeks ahead.
          Nevertheless, there are a few things you should keep in mind before committing to your trip: the Antelope Canyons, another popular attraction in Page, AZ, are closed and expect to remain so until June. There are also over 3,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and the Navajo Reservation has been hit particularly hard. They are asking that travelers avoid that area altogether if possible.
          In addition, many other popular attractions in the area such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley may be partially or completely closed. With all that in mind, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and personal hygiene protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

    1. Dear Anthony,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants. However, the Antelope Canyons are closed until further notice. In light of that fact, plus considering that there are over 1,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and many popular nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, and Monument Valley are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most importantly, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

    1. Dear Esraa,
      As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open.
      However, in light of the fact that there are over 100 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including some fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many major attractions in the area including the Grand Canyon and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend considering whether your visit is 100% necessary. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very limited medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their respective capacities.
      If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
      – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
      – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
      – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
      – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
      – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
      – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
      – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
      – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

        1. Dear Sky,
          As of this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open, but that status could change without notice rather quickly if the situation warrants.
          In light of the fact that there are over 500 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (including several dozen fatalities) in Northern Arizona, and that many nearby attractions such as the Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, Monument Valley, and the Antelope Canyons are closed, we strongly recommend that you seriously consider whether your visit is 100% necessary at this time. Please bear in mind that most areas of Northern Arizona are quite rural and remote, with very small medical facilities that have already been taxed beyond their limited capacities.
          If you do decide to come, please follow social distancing and cleanliness protocols as outlined by the CDC and WHO:
          – Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use >60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
          – Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
          – Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
          – When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, or do so into your elbow. Dispose of the tissue and wash your hands again.
          – Practicing social distancing (stay at least 6′ away from other people) and avoid congregations of 10 or more people. In the office, keep 6 feet of separation between yourself and others to reduce the potential spread of infection.
          – Use virtual tools instead of holding in-person meetings.
          – Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
          – Most important, if you experience flu symptoms or any serious infection or virus, please stay home to avoid exposing others.
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley

    1. Hi Johnny,
      At this moment, Horseshoe Bend remains open for visitation. For your health and safety, and that of your families, please practice basic common-sense measures as advised by the CDC and WHO: wash your hands frequently, stay at least 6′ away from other people, avoid touching your face, especially after touching hand-rails, credit card machines, and other surfaces that get touched frequently, and last but not least, stay home or at your hotel if you feel the least bit sick.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  55. Hi
    we are planning a 1 day trip to Page, AZ. We will have a small rental car. We will be in 2 adults and a small child. Due to the age of the child we are not planning heavy hiking or very long hrs tours.
    Is it possible just to see the Horseshoe Bend and Glenn Dam without a tour Guide? Is it Monument Valley very far from Horseshoe? Can it be visited by car just to take some pictures? Is it possible to safely drive on permitted areas? Should we get a tour guide to drive us to the Monument Valley? Thanks in Advance!

    1. Hi Mary,
      Horseshoe Bend can be visited anytime between the hours of sunrise and sunset in your own vehicle. Keep in mind it is a long-ish walk from the parking lot to the overlook (.6 miles one way), so you might want to be ready with a backpack carrier for the kiddo. To visit the Glen Canyon Dam just on the topside area does not require a tour; if you wanted to get down into the power plant area, however, a guided tour is required since those are restricted areas. Glen Canyon Dam Tours While in Page, AZ, you should also tour Antelope Canyon; Upper would be best since you are traveling with a small child.
      Monument Valley is approximately a 2-hour drive from Page, AZ. If you are OK with photographing it from the road or Visitors Center, plenty of people do just that. There is a 17-mile scenic loop drive that you can also take, but we would strongly discourage attempting it in a rental car. Off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies and doing so would void your insurance, leaving you on the hook for any damage you might sustain. If you would prefer to explore Monument Valley with a local guide service, you would certainly get more out of your experience that way. There are a number of guide services and types of tours to choose from, so be sure to explore your options thoroughly and make advance reservations. Monument Valley Guided Tours
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  56. Hi Alley,
    I will be traveling from st George on the 5th of march to horseshoe bend for a day trip and i wanted to know if you have any recommendations? any must see’s?

    1. Hi Gary,
      In addition to Horseshoe Bend, you should plan on visiting Antelope Canyon. A guided tour is required for this, which must be reserved in advance.
      In addition to Antelope Canyon, other sights you might hit, time and inclination permitting, are the Glen Canyon Dam, John Wesley Powell Museum (currently inside the Glen Canyon Conservancy building), and the “New” Wave aka the Beehives. Though it’s a little cold for getting in the water, you might still enjoy a walk by the shore of Lake Powell at Wahweap or Antelope Point Marina, or Lone Rock Beach. These areas are located within the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, which means you’ll have to pay the park entrance fee, which may or may not be worth it for just a short visit.
      Remember it takes approximately 2.5 hours each way to drive from St. George, UT, to Page, AZ. Be sure to time your return trip so that you’re not doing any of it in the dark. A majority of the route is very dimly lit (a deliberate move to preserve the natural darkness of the night sky), and sometimes populated by deer, elk, and other wildlife that can raise your risk of an auto accident. Not something you want to chance in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell phone service is spotty to non-existent, and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive! Sunset on March 5th occurs at 6:25 PM, so you’ll want to start the trip back to St. George, UT, by 4:00, 4:30 PM at the latest.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    2. Hi,
      We are planning to drive from Las Vegas in the morning and stay 1 night in Page before heading back to Vegas by nightfall the 2nd day during Early December timeframe. We will like to visit antelope canyon (upper and Lower) as well as Horseshoe bend. We know it’s 4 1/2 hour drive from Vegas so we won’t get to Page until early afternoon. What’s the best itinerary for us to visit all 3 sites and hopefully some good meals. Thanks.

      1. Hi Pamela,
        The best way to schedule your trip will depend largely on availability of tours. Since you are driving over from Las Vegas, then driving back the following day, you’ll probably need to tour one segment of Antelope Canyon on your arrival day, then the other after visiting Horseshoe Bend the next day. For more information, visit “How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon” on our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
        Horseshoe Bend is best visited just after sunrise for ease of parking and fewer crowds to contend with. In early December, sunrise occurs at around 7:30 AM.
        As for places to dine, you’ll find no shortage of options and types of cuisine. For suggestions, check out TripAdvisor.com: 10 Best Restaurants in Page, AZ.
        Good luck and safe travels,
        Alley 🙂

  57. Hi,
    There are three of us who are going to be vacationing in Tempe Jan 18-Jan 22. We are wanting to see both horseshoe bend and antelope canyon. I am wondering if this is a good time to see both or if it will be too cold. If it is a good time to see them we would like to make it a one day thing, which would you recommend doing first. We plan to drive and get there as early as possible.

    1. Hi Kayla!
      There’s no such thing as a “bad” time to visit Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend, but January is definitely a bad time to attempt to do it as a day trip out of Tempe, AZ.
      It takes approximately 4.5 hours, one way, to drive from Tempe, AZ, to Page, AZ. Touring Antelope Canyon takes anywhere from 2-3 hours depending on which branch of Antelope Canyon you choose to tour, and factoring advance check-in time and the inevitable “bottlenecking” that occurs as the day goes on. You then need ~30 minutes to transit from Antelope Canyon to Horseshoe Bend, and 90 minutes to 2 hours to find a place to park, hike the .6 miles out to the overlook, take photos, and hike the .6 miles back. So that’s 4-6 hours for hitting the attractions on your wish list, and getting lunch at some point. You’re then facing a 4.5-hour drive back to Tempe, AZ, and proposing to do all that at a time of year when daylength is short: sunrise occurs at ~7:30 AM, sunset takes place at around 5:30 PM. Driving at night is best avoided in Northern Arizona due to roads being very dimly lit, and the possible presence of deer, elk, and other wildlife that can ratchet up your chance of a collision. Trust me, you don’t want to chance that in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell service is spotty (if you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive.
      A better plan would be to spend the night in Page, AZ, so you can enjoy Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend at a more relaxed pace!
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year 🙂
      Alley

  58. We will be around this area the 2nd week of June and looking to rent a speed boat for the 6 of us on Lake Powell. Where would you reccomend going to see?
    Thank you,
    Adam

    1. Hey Adam!
      This is an excellent question, and fortunately, there is no “right” or “wrong” answer. Lake Powell is chock-a-block with amazing sites, and part of the fun is discovering them for yourself. Another factor that may or may not affect what you can and/or cannot do is the water level of Lake Powell at the time you visit. When you check in for your boat rental, you should be given a map of the most easily accessible sites from the marina. Be sure to carry food and water with you, so if you see a spot that looks good for a picnic, you can indulge your instincts.
      Bear in mind that in June, days are starting to get hot, so the closer you can be to shade during the peak heat of the mid-day hours, the better. Thankfully, you can always take a cool dip in the lake from virtually anywhere!
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays,
      Alley 🙂

  59. Hello, I am trying to plan to visit the Antelope Canyon @1030am with the tour ending at 12noon, then proceed to Horseshoe Bend on 22 Dec. Would you be able to share if this would be a ideal route during this period? Thanks

    1. Hey Sally,
      The Horseshoe Bend overlook is approximately a 10-minute drive from the Antelope Canyons, so going there after your Antelope Canyon tour shouldn’t be a problem as long as you can find parking. Another option worth considering is to visit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise, which occurs at ~7:30 AM, then head to your tour from there.
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Kellie,
      If you were referring to how to book a tour to Horseshoe Bend, it’s not necessary to do so. You can visit in your own vehicle between the hours of sunrise and sunset, parking permitting. If you prefer not to deal with the potential hassles, shuttle service to the overlook is offered through Horseshoe Bend Slot Canyon Tours.
      For Antelope Canyon, a guided tour is required. For more information, visit our companion site, http://www.AntelopeCanyon.AZ
      If we failed to answer your question adequately, please feel free to write in again for further guidance.
      Good luck, safe travels, and Happy Holidays!
      Alley 🙂

  60. Hello there,

    I am trying to plan accordingly, but having a difficult time deciding on where I should stay overnight. I am arriving in PHX at 9am on 11/2 and have booked a tour to see Upper AC at 10am on Sunday 11/3. My plan is to also visit Horshoeband after that tour on Sunday. My dilemma is: should I stay overnight in PHX and leave at 4/5 am or travel half way on Saturday afternoon to Sedona or Flagstaff in order to cut my commute. I have read that it is not safe to travel when it is dark due to visibility and large animals on the road. I also plan to visit the GC on Monday and then head to Vegas Monday afternoon/evening. Also debating on where I should stay overnight after my day in Page.
    I have never been to AZ so I am trying to make the best of it. I really would like to explore PHX and Sedona, but I don’t think I will have time. Any advice on this would be helpful! Thanks!!

    1. Hi Tanya and thank you for visiting our site! I am sorry it took me awhile to respond to your question, I was working over the weekend up near Grand Teton National Park 🙂
      If your flight arrives in Phoenix at 9:00 AM on 11/2, you should have ample time to drive all the way up to Page, AZ, to spend the night. The trip from Phoenix to Page takes ~5 hours, so even if your plane is a couple of hours late, you should still have enough daylight to work with. In early November, sunset occurs at around 5:30 PM, and sunrise takes place at approximately 7:00 AM.
      RE: your plan to drive from Page to Grand Canyon South Rim, then on to Vegas, that’s where you need to rethink things. It takes ~3-3.5 hours to drive from Page to Grand Canyon South Rim; that’s factoring in the stops you’ll inevitably make. It’s a very scenic drive, and photo ops are everywhere you look! It would then take you another 5 hours or so to drive from GC to Las Vegas. At a time of year when you have less than 12 hours of daylight to work with, and you’re contending with a time difference (Arizona will be on Mountain Time, Nevada on Pacific Time), it’s a recipe for a race against the clock to make it to Vegas by 4:30 PM when the sun goes down. Better to overnight at Grand Canyon South Rim, then head back to Las Vegas the next morning.
      I agree that you don’t have sufficient time to explore Sedona this time around. That area really needs 3-4 days to fully explore and enjoy, so save it for another trip when you can give it the time it deserves!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  61. Hi Alley – we will be in Page on 10/20-23; we booked an airbnb there. There will be six people in my group.

    Planning to do the horseshoe bend (before sunrise) and lower antelope canyon tour (at 12:30 – only slot available) on 10/21 plus self-guided kayak tour lake Powell if time permits. We have a minivan rental but not sure if we can hook 3 tandem kayaks.
    – How far are the vendors from the lake? Are they walking distance from the lake?
    – Can they help us with the kayaks?
    – Is it better to do it in the morning or afternoon? Weather forecast is 84F.
    – If we do it in the morning, will we be able to check in at the lower canyon tour by noon?

    Then on 10/22, drive to Utah to hike Angel’s landing in Zion and also see the dinosaur tracks (can we easily find these ourselves or do you suggest booking a tour?). I looked up the weather forecast and currently indicating 63F on 10/22. That’s cold but I think we can handle it. Just not sure how safe it’ll be up there? Snow? Flash floods? What do you suggest we do instead?

    We’re flying home 6pm the next day from PHX. So it’ll be 4-6 hrs drive from Page. Can’t really fit anything else except for a quick souvenir shopping that day. Any idea of the traffic that day? Or other places we MUST check out before leaving AZ.

    Really really appreciate any feedback.

    RC from Sacramento

    1. Hi Rachelle and apologies for the delay in response to your inquiry.
      The tour companies typically do help people get the kayaks onto their vehicles, but it probably won’t be possible to get 3 kayaks onto one vehicle. Also, kayak rental outlets are located in the town of Page, AZ. They are not walking distance from Lake Powell. Due to the logistics and potential difficulties of getting that many kayaks down to the lake, self-guided kayak touring may not be the best activity for you to pursue. Another thing: not sure where you’re getting the 84 degree weather forecast for Page, AZ. Current local weather forecasts show daytime highs in the mid-to-high 60’s range, with the possibility of rain cropping up here and there. If you really want to do a water-based activity, a boat tour from nearby Antelope Point Marina might be more practical, not to mention more comfortable.
      As for Angel’s Landing, the most recent weather forecast for Zion National Park is also calling for rain the day you’ll be there. You may indeed want to consider some alternate hikes, which fortunately are numerous and diverse in length, degree of difficulty, and scenic features.
      The dinosaur track site I think you’re referring to is actually located in the town of St. George, UT, which may be a bit too far out of your way if you’re just doing a day trip to Zion. Johnson Farm Dinosaur Discovery Site A site that may be a bit easier to access, both time-wise, and driving-wise, is the Moenkopi Dinosaur Track Site near Tuba City, AZ. When you get make the drive down to Phoenix, you would make a short detour off US89 via US160, then take the same road back to US89 to resume the drive. The tour is technically complimentary, but the guides do appreciate gratuities. Another stop you might make on the way back to Phoenix is the Cameron Trading Post. Good place to grab breakfast/brunch and do some souvenir shopping.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  62. Hi Alley, Is it reasonable to see both Upper Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend in a single day, assuming we are able to get on a tour of Upper Antelope at the ideal time? And if yes, which would suggest doing first (Horseshoe or Upper Antelope)? I’m thinking an early tour of Upper Antelope first, but let me know your thoughts. We plan to be there is late November. Thanks!

    1. Hi Steve,
      Yes, it is totally possible to tour both Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend in a single day. They are located about 10 minutes apart from one another, so, no problem.
      Due to parking snarls at Horseshoe Bend this summer, which could carry over into shoulder season, we recommend hitting the overlook first thing in the morning.
      Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  63. hi, i´m going to the us in two weeks, i just wanna know if we can just get directly to horseshoebend or antilope canyon and if i can pay the tour just right there?, or it is necessary to go to page, AZ to get one, and how much do they cost?

    If you could provide me a phone number to have more infomation about this, i would apreciate.
    THANK YOU

    1. Hi Jared!
      For Horseshoe Bend, you can go directly to the overlook any time you wish: in theory. In reality, you might find parking difficult, especially if you arrive during the mid-day hours. If you find this to be the case when you arrive, here are some tips on how to deal with that situation: “Help! There’s No Place To Park At Horseshoe Bend” Hint: it’s best to go there first thing after sunrise for fewer people and cooler temperatures.
      For Antelope Canyon, a tour is a must, as are advance reservations. If you prefer to take your tour directly from the Navajo Tribal Park Entrance on US98, that can be done, but again, not without a reservation. As for contact information, you must choose whether you want to tour Upper or Lower Antelope Canyon as the tour companies are different. For further information, visit “How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon.”
      Hope that helps you out. Good luck and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  64. I am planning on bringing my boys to the Lower Antelope Canyon, but noticed the site says it can take up to 3 hours to get in. If we schedule a 9am tour, do we really need to be there at 6am to get in?

    We will also be touring Horseshoe Bend, as we have never been to either location. Actually, we have never seen the Grand Canyon and we have lived in AZ for 15 years.

    1. Hi Julie,
      If you book a 9 AM tour, you don’t need to be there at 6 AM to get in, but you might experience delays in entry depending on the number of visitors there. The Navajo Tribe and Antelope Canyon tour outfitters are currently taking steps to alleviate crowding in this extremely popular attraction. If you don’t wish to endure all this rigmarole, you might consider touring any number of alternate slot canyons that are just as beautiful, but far less crowded.
      As for Horseshoe Bend, you may go there whenever you wish, since it’s open 24 hours a day. Although I wouldn’t recommend going at night necessarily 😉
      If you would like to visit the Grand Canyon, it’s only a 2.5 hour drive from Page, and you definitely should see it!
      Take care and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  65. Hello!

    I’m looking to visit horseshoe bend/antelope canyon late May and was wondering about pet restrictions for those areas as well as any good suggestions for camping in or around the area that allows dogs. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

    1. Hi Bri and thank you for your excellent question.
      Dogs are welcome at Horseshoe Bend as long as they are leashed and you pick up after them. In May, it’s already getting pretty warm, so be sure to bring enough water for yourself and your pet!
      Dogs are not allowed, however, in Antelope Canyon. Exceptions *might* be made if the dog is a service animal, but you would need to contact the tour companies directly to inquire, plus the dog would have to have appropriate certification by the proper authorities.
      Camping is not allowed at Horseshoe Bend, but you can find excellent opportunities for both RV and tent camping at the Page/Lake Powell Campground in the town of Page, AZ, the Wahweap/Stateline Campground near Lake Powell Resort in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (entrance fees apply) or at Lone Rock Beach on the Utah/Arizona border. Page/Lake Powell Camping Options
      Hope that helps. Best wishes and safe travels!
      Alley 🙂

  66. Good morning
    We would lo like to receive information about types of tours and price for a 5 members family

    We would like how to Reserve a tour in the antelope canyon on 26th or 27th in march

    We will in Monument valley on 26th in the morning so we will rravel to antelope canyon by car

    Could you give me options and prices?
    We are looking for a 2 hours tour
    Our kids are 15, 12 and 10 years old

    1. Hi Claudia,
      Since you’ll be traveling from Monument Valley, it would be most convenient for you to take your Antelope Canyon tour directly from the Tribal Park Entrance on US98 before you get to Page.
      The key at this point is to decide whether you’ll tour Upper Antelope Canyon or Lower Antelope Canyon. Upper is the easier of the two, just 100 yards in length, fairly flat the whole way. Lower is longer (600m), requires some stair climbing and simple bouldering. If your family are all relatively fit, Lower should be manageable for you.
      If you do choose Lower, there are two outfitters that conduct tours of that branch of the canyon:
      Dixie Ellis Tours, https://antelopelowercanyon.com/ and Ken’s Lower Antelope Tours https://lowerantelope.com/
      The tours are virtually identical in logistics and price, so pick one that has availability for your desired time and book it. Remember that Monument Valley will be on Mountain Daylight Time and Page, AZ will be on Mountain Standard Time, so you’ll “gain” an hour when you enter Page. Also, be sure to allow at least 2 hours to drive from Monument Valley to Page.
      If you prefer to tour Upper, Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours is the outfitter operating from the Tribal Park Entrance Gate. https://navajotours.com/tour-packages/#book-a-tour
      Good luck and have a safe trip!
      Alley 🙂

  67. Hi Alley,

    we have almost 2year old toddler, do you think is manageable for us to do the Antelope Canyon tour? And the Horseshoe bend, do we have to purchase tickets somewhere in advance, or its free? Thank you.
    Eva

    1. Hi Eva!
      With a 2-year-old, I would recommend sticking to Upper Antelope Canyon. If you end up having to carry your child, going up and down ladders and scrambling over boulders in Lower won’t be fun at all. Upper is 100 yards long and pretty flat the whole way. You might request to sit up front on the ride from the Tribal Park Gate to the canyon’s entrance, but the walking part is fairly easy. Be sure you make reservations in advance for your tour. How To Book A Tour Of Antelope Canyon
      RE: Horseshoe Bend, it is open 24/7, so you can visit whenever you wish. There, you’ll want to keep an eye on your toddler as the majority of the overlook is unfenced and it’s a 700′ drop to the river. If the prospect of that unnerves you, there will be a viewing platform with safety railings completed by springtime.
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  68. Aloha,
    Just wanted to thank you for sharing! We look forward to visiting Page and will definitely be able to see its beauty thanks to your information.

    1. Deb,
      Yá’át’ééh! That’s “hello” in Navajo 😉
      Thank you for taking the time to visit our site and pay us your compliments.
      Have a wonderful trip and be sure to let us know how you got on!
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Linda!
      To schedule a tour for Antelope Canyon, you must first decide whether you want to tour Lower or Upper Antelope Canyon. In a nutshell, Lower is more physical, Upper is easier. Then find the tour outfitter who has the departure that best fits your schedule. How To Book A Tour For Antelope Canyon
      As for Horseshoe Bend, you may visit it at any time, a tour is not required.
      Hope that helps and that you have a wonderful visit!
      Alley 🙂

      1. I’m visiting the Grand Canyon and saw an advertisement for Horseshoe Bend. We are staying in Flagstaff for a few days and wanted to visit both. Any tips on how to see Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend in a day?

        1. Hi Emanuel,
          You should be aware that will take you at least 5 hours round-trip to drive from Flagstaff to Page, AZ, and back again. You should also take the opportunity to visit Wupatki and Sunset Crater National Monuments just North of Flagstaff since they are right on the way. The two monuments are situated close together and are connected via a convenient loop drive, which takes about 2 hours on average.
          Horseshoe Bend is situated just South of the town of Page, AZ, so theoretically, you should hit that on your way into town, parking permitting. If the parking lot is full at the time of your visit, you will be asked to return at a later time when parking is available. If you are able to park, then 60-90 minutes should be allowed to hike out to the overlook, take photos, then hike back to the parking lot.
          Then tour Antelope Canyon that afternoon. Advance reservations are an absolute must to have. Depending on which Antelope Canyon tour you take, 2.5-3 hours minimum should be allowed for this activity.
          Honestly, instead of visiting Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend as a day trip from Flagstaff, it’s better to plan on staying overnight in Page, AZ. That way, you won’t risk having to drive back to Flagstaff at night, which we strongly discourage due to the lack of lighting on area roads, and the possibility of encountering deer, elk, free range cattle, and even wild horses. If you take us up on the suggestion to overnight in Page, AZ, you can hit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise the next day, which will impart the benefits of cooler temperatures and fewer people.
          Hope that helps — good luck and safe travels!
          Alley 🙂

    1. Hi Desiree, this is an excellent question!
      The best time of year to visit Northern Arizona is when temperatures are not so hot (or so cold) and tourist attractions are not so crowded. That tends to be the timeframe during late September and October. Granted, it will still be busy, so hotels will be full (or nearly full) and you still must make reservations for popular activities such as Antelope Canyon tours, but for the most part, temperatures will be pleasant and with children back in school, it’s usually just us “grown-ups” out there.
      Hope that was the information you were looking for!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  69. Hi
    We will be in PAGE 25 APRIL 2018 and we are interested in a full day smooth river tour on the Colorado river
    Do you have any tours and what is the Price

    1. Hi Vibeke –
      At the present time, the concessionaire for the Smooth Water Float Trip is in transition. Glen Canyon Rafting Hospitality will assume operational responsibility in the 2018 season, but have yet to launch an official website. We recommend checking back periodically by doing a Google search for “glen canyon float trips” or “Page Arizona smooth water raft trips.”
      If you cannot acquire satisfactory information within the next few weeks, please contact the National Park Service at 928-608-6200.
      Sorry we can’t be of more help at present.
      Alley 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *